world-bird-sanctuary

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//our beautiful world..

It’s not easy to get owls to mug for the camera. Even in captivity the birds remain aloof, unruffled by the flash and unmoved by attempts to bribe them. Photographer Brad Wilson learned that lesson firsthand after trying to win over owls from the World Bird Sanctuary in St. Louis and The Wildlife Center near Española, New Mexico. He spent hours with each bird, trying to capture its direct gaze. “It’s hard to get animals to look at you like humans do,” he says. “That shot became my holy grail.

One of our absolutely stunning Palm-Nut Vultures!

The male is  rather shy however the female ((pictured)) is curious about everything! She growls and calls at you as you walk past the aviary and is always sat as close to the front of their aviary as possible!

She’s a little trouble maker so it’s a good job she’s adorable!

*DO NOT remove caption or re-upload*

Day 36, the Barn Swallow!  I love these birds, they’re fun to listen to and watch.  For two years in a row there’s been one that sleeps on the chain of the porch swing at night and I’m glad the little guy felt safe enough there to return after the migration!

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project tag | commissions

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“It’s not easy to get owls to mug for the camera. Even in captivity the birds remain aloof, unruffled by the flash and unmoved by attempts to bribe them. Photographer Brad Wilson learned that lesson firsthand after trying to win over owls from the World Bird Sanctuary in St. Louis andThe Wildlife Center near Española, New Mexico. He spent hours with each bird, trying to capture its direct gaze. “It’s hard to get animals to look at you like humans do,” he says. “That shot became my holy grail.

”Wilson is an expert at point-blank portraits. His series “Affinity” features 65 species, including a white rhino, a white tiger, an Arctic fox, and an Egyptian Vulture. But owls were the most compelling and challenging subjects, he says. It takes years of building mutual trust before an owl will accept physical contact from a single person, says Wilson, and “owls don’t extend that privilege to other humans.”Wilson wanted his images to accentuate the nobility and independence of each captive bird, minimizing its dependence on its caretaker. Many had wing injuries, for example, which he concealed in his pictures. The owls’ human perches likewise hid themselves, contorting their bodies to stay out of the frame. It was a gesture to the birds, a way of saying that although their wild days are behind them, they still have their dignity.

Source: http://www.audubon.org/magazine/january-february-2015/whos-who

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Indigo Bunting 

High Island, TX. 

This Bottle Brush bush is one of several in a private resident yard across the street from the world famous Audubon Bird Sanctuary at High Island. The yard is often literally full of migrants during the spring migration season. Luckily, the owner is very tolerant of birders tramping around and through the yard so long as they don’t park their cars on the street near the house. Sure hope they never sell!