theguardian.com
Teenager who killed husband after he raped her is sentenced to death in Sudan
Activists in last-ditch effort to save 19-year-old condemned to death for stabbing the man she was forced to marry as he assaulted her
By Peter Beaumont

“A 19-year-old Sudanese woman has been condemned to death by a court in Omdurman for stabbing to death the husband to whom she was forcibly married, who she says raped her with assistance of his family.

The death penalty for Noura Hussein was confirmed by a judge on Thursday after her husband’s family rejected the possibility of financial compensation and instead asked for her to be executed.

The case has attracted widespread attention on social media, where a campaign Justice for Noura has been trending on Twitter.

Her legal team now has 15 days to appeal the sentence.”


SIGN THE PETITION: https://www.change.org/p/justice-for-noura-maritalrape-deathsentence-sudan

Tweet #SaveNoura and #JusticeForNoura to boost the signal.

theguardian.com
We have 12 years to limit climate change catastrophe, warns UN
The world’s leading climate scientists have warned there is only a dozen years for global warming to be kept to a maximum of 1.5C, beyond which even half a degree will significantly worsen the risks of drought, floods, extreme heat and poverty for hundreds of millions of people.
By Jonathan Watts

(X)

This is The Prime Minister Of New Zealand, Jacinda Ardern. She’s 37. She’s the youngest female head of government in the world. She’s also the first western woman to give birth while in this position of power. 2 days after the baby was born - with midwives, standard in NZ hospitals - she introduced her to the country during a press conference on the nightly news. It was really lovely. She named her Neve Te Aroha. Te Aroha means “The Love” in Maori. It represents ALL the names that were submitted (upon her request) from various tribes throughout the country, and was her attempt at capturing them all.
This is her and her partner, no, he’s NOT her husband (gasp!), walking to the press conference. He’s TV fishing show Host Clarke Gayford, and HE will be staying at home with baby Neve when his lady goes back to running the country in 6 weeks. Clarke sports a snazzy sweater he picked up at the op-shop (second-hand store) in Gisborne, and thinks its just kinda logical that he gives up his day job to stay home and look after the baby.

A week after the birth on July 1st Jacinda introduced a $5billion Families Package that she’d drafted on the floor of her friends house in Hastings - long before her pregnancy. It’s based on the knowledge that the first few years of a babies life are the most important. The package gives an extra $60 a week to families with new babies, and an extra $700 to families for winter heating costs as well (it’s cold as hell down there in the winter). It also increases the Paid Leave for new parents from 18 weeks to 22 weeks. She announced the details via Facebook live, from her couch, right after she’d finished breastfeeding the baby. Because Kiwis. Some of the most down-to-earth, no-drama-having, just-do-it kind of people you’ll ever meet.

And because Women. We really do know how to lead, and to do it well.

Tracee Ellis Ross’ Children’s Book for ‘Handsy Men’

“Our guest host Tracee Ellis Ross decided that since she had a big platform like this, she wanted to talk about the Hollywood sexual harassment scandal. Over the past two months, countless brave women have come forward to share their experiences and while Tracee isn’t totally surprised by these stories, it seems like quite a few men are. Treating women with respect shouldn’t be complicated but it seems to be a bit confusing for a lot of men. So Tracee wrote a children’s book for men to make this real simple for them.” #TheHandsyMan ~ Jimmy Kimmel Live

theguardian.com
Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles
The breakthrough, spurred by the discovery of plastic-eating bugs at a Japanese dump, could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis
By Damian Carrington

Scientists have created a mutant enzyme that breaks down plastic drinks bottles – by accident. The breakthrough could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis by enabling for the first time the full recycling of bottles.

The new research was spurred by the discovery in 2016 of the first bacterium that had naturally evolved to eat plastic, at a waste dump in Japan. Scientists have now revealed the detailed structure of the crucial enzyme produced by the bug.

The international team then tweaked the enzyme to see how it had evolved, but tests showed they had inadvertently made the molecule even better at breaking down the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic used for soft drink bottles. “What actually turned out was we improved the enzyme, which was a bit of a shock,” said Prof John McGeehan, at the University of Portsmouth, UK, who led the research. “It’s great and a real finding.”

The mutant enzyme takes a few days to start breaking down the plastic – far faster than the centuries it takes in the oceans. But the researchers are optimistic this can be speeded up even further and become a viable large-scale process.

(via Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles | The Guardian)

theguardian.com
Ireland has spoken. The eighth amendment is history | Ivana Bacik
An end to our 35-year struggle for safe, legal abortion is at last in sight, writes senator and campaigner Ivana Bacik
By Ivana Bacik

I am ridiculously happy about this. Ireland proves its progressive values again, despite the era of Trump and Brexit we are living in. WELL DONE. Let’s help the women of Northern Ireland next.

theguardian.com
Imaging tool unravels secrets of child's sock from ancient Egypt
Non-invasive technique devised by British Museum sheds light on dyeing and weaving process
By Caroline Davies

The ancient Egyptians famously gave us paper and the pyramids, but were also early adopters of the stripy sock.

Scientists at the British Museum have developed pioneering imaging to discover how enterprising Egyptians used dyes on a child’s sock, recovered from a rubbish dump in ancient Antinoupolis in Roman Egypt, and dating from 300AD.

New multispectral imaging can establish which dyes were used – madder (red), woad (blue) and weld (yellow) – but also how people of the late antiquity period used double and sequential dying and weaving, and twisting fibres to create myriad colours from their scarce resources.

Continue reading