world war ii: us army

Marlene Dietrich, Bob Hope and Bette Davis - all active in efforts to support US troops during World War II - visiting the Hollywood Hall of Honor at the Hollywood Canteen, a memorial for their colleagues who have enlisted in the US military. Davis points to a photo of Clark Gable, who was a major in the US Army Air Forces.

1943: Burgess explains how an English pub differs from American saloons. This educational documentary (which was narrated, written, and co-directed by Burgess) was made to introduce American soldiers to Britain during World War II. 

The only fan page solely dedicated to Burgess Meredith // Lovingly ran by his grandniece in attempt to keep his legacy alive.

Defense of the Aleutians by Dominic D'Andrea

Arkansas’ 206th Coast Artillery Regiment (Anti-Aircraft) defend Dutch Harbor as the Japanese make airborne attacks on the military installation there June 3, 1942.

(National Guard)

Creepypasta #1078: I Found Something Impossible In My Backyard

Length: Long

In my backyard, we have a koi pond. It’s been kind of a never-ending project of mine and my wife’s, something we’ve put a lot of time, effort, and money into in the 3 years we’ve lived in our house. A few weeks ago, we decided to extend it some, and I finally got started on what needed to be done to do that last week. I started digging. After about 3 hours I’d dug a good amount of the area I needed to out, and was about 4 feet down in this particular spot when I hit something. Whatever it was, it was metal.

I continued digging, looking for an edge of whatever this was, and I found it. I followed the edge around as I kept digging, and it turned out to be a square with a handle on top, and two hinges on one side. I pulled up on the handle, but I couldn’t get it open. I figured it was a chest or case of some kind, so I dug around the sides of it, but no matter how far I dug, it just kept going. I finally came to the conclusion that it was a hatch of some sort, perhaps a bomb shelter. When we bought the house, there had been no mention of a bomb shelter there, nor had there ever been mention of it in the history of the house.

I dug an area around the hatch so I could more easily get to the top. After a few hours, a night of sleep, and a few more hours the next day of blowtorches, drills, and hammers, I finally got the hatch open.

As soon as I pulled the door off, I was was hit with a wave of foul odor. The smell was stale and putrid, and was like a mixture of rotten eggs, spoiled milk, and a group of dead skunks. After taking a moment to catch my breath, I finally was able to hold it while I looked inside. There was a ladder that led downwards probably about 20 feet, and I could just barely make a out a floor with the sunlight provided. I went to my garage and got a dust mask, hoping it would at least mask the smell some, and grabbed a flashlight.

I began my descent down the ladder while my wife stayed up top, curiously observing. The smell only worsened the further down I got, and the mask was doing next to nothing to offset it. I stopped several times on the way down, warding off the urge to vomit. Finally, I think I just got used to it enough to not gag with every breath I took. I made it to the bottom, and there was a small corridor to the left, past which was a large room.

Just as I had suspected, it looked like a fallout shelter. There were two rows of shelving units that once held non-perishable foods, almost all of which were gone. I found a light switch on the wall next to me, which I turned on. To my surprise, rows of fluorescent lights lit up, allowing me to see the entire area. 

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“General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the order of the Day. "Full victory - nothing else” to paratroopers in England on June 6, 1944, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe. All of the men with General Eisenhower are members of Company E, 502d.“

(US Army)

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In case you guys didn’t know about Marlene Dietrich (I didn’t either) she’s the celebrity Sasha Velour is playing on snatch game and here’s a few facts from this video

-She’s from Germany and after she gained some fame there, she moved to Hollywood and had an affair with a director
-after she broke up with him she became the MOST WELL PAID WOMAN IN THE WORLD
-SHE WAS BI
-AND GENDER NON COMFORTING
- THERE’S A SCENE IN A MOVIE WHERE SHE WALKS OUT IN A TUX, WALKS UP TO A STRAIGHT COUPLE AND KISSES THE WOMAN
-Hitler BEGGED her to come back to Germany but she was like no fuck you -during World War II SHE FUCKING JOINED THE US ARMY AND PERFORMED FOR THEM IN HORRIBLE CONDITIONS AND ALMOST DIED LIKE 5 TIMES BECAUSE SHE WANTED TO FIGHT HITLER
-when she found out her sister was working for the Nazis in a concentration camp SHE DISOWNED HER FOREVER


SHE’S AMAZING AND IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT SASHA OF ALL PEOPLE IS PLAYING THIS AMAZING WOMAN

“Members of the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) pose at Camp Shanks, New York, before leaving from New York Port of Embarkation on Feb. 2, 1945. The women are with the first contingent of Black American WACs to go overseas for the war effort From left to right are, kneeling: Pvt. Rose Stone; Pvt. Virginia Blake; and Pfc. Marie B. Gillisspie. Second row: Pvt. Genevieve Marshall; T/5 Fanny L. Talbert; and Cpl. Callie K. Smith. Third row: Pvt. Gladys Schuster Carter; T/4 Evelyn C. Martin; and Pfc. Theodora Palmer.”

(AP)

10

Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor Part 2

1) M1A1 Abrams. American third-gen MBT named after General Creighton Abrams. Highly mobile, the Abrams is designed for modern armored warfare and tank-to-tank combat. Notable features include the use of a powerful multifuel turbine engine, the adoption of sophisticated composite armor, and separate ammunition storage in a blow-out compartment for crew safety. The M1 Abrams entered U.S. service in 1980, replacing the M60. The M1 remains the principal main battle tank of the United States Army and Marine Corps, and the armies of Egypt, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Australia and Iraq. The M1A1 upgrade began production in 1985 and continued to 1992, adding a pressurized NBC system, a rear bustle rack for improved stowage of supplies and crew belongings, redesigned blow-off panels and new M256 120 mm smoothbore cannon.

2 & 3) XM1 Abrams. American limited production prototype for the M! Abrams MBT. After the MBT-70 program was cancelled, as well as the iterative XM803, funds were reallocated to the XM815, renamed later XM1 Abrams. This new program reused most of the XM803 features but again, in a simpler and cheaper way. The need to eliminates the costliest technologies from the failed MBT-70 project, defined those used in the new tank. In June 1973, Chrysler and GM were awarded the contract to built prototypes of the new tank designated M1, handed over to the US Army for trials in February 1976. The first batch of M1s, before standardization, were still designated XM-1s, as Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) models.

4 & 5) M52A1. American 105mm SPG based off of the M41 Walker Bulldog light tank’s chassis. Development began in 1948 and was known as the T98 Howitzer Motor Carriage and entered service in 1951. Total production amounted to some 541 vehicles and the M52 saw extensive use during Vietnam and remains in service with some armies to this day. This M52A1 was donated by the Army in 1965

6) XM551 Sheridan. American prototype for the M551 Sheridan light tank. In the immediate post-World War II era, the US Army introduced the M41 Walker Bulldog into service to fill the role of a light tank. The lifespan of the M41 was fairly short; at 25 tons it was considered too heavy to be a true light tank, and had a rather short cruising range. With the appearence of the Pt-76 amphibious tank, the prototypes in development were scrapped and the XM551 begun. The XM551 would turn into the questionably useful M551 Sheridan and serve in Vietnam. This Sheridan was acquired by the museum from Army Material Command at Rock Island, Illinois in May 1971/

7) M4A3E8(76)w HVSS. American medium tank of WWII, the M4A3(76) HVSS upgraded the standard M4′s main gun to a more powerful 76mm cannon and Horizontal Volute Spring Suspension. This new suspension allowed for greater mobility as well as heavier armor. The vehicle was mass-produced beginning in late March 1945, with a total of 4542 the М4А3(76)W tanks with both suspension types manufactured.

8) M7B1 Priest. American SPG of WWII. Witnessing the events of the war, U.S. Army observers realized that they would need a self-propelled artillery vehicle with sufficient firepower to support armored operations. Lessons learned with half-tracks also showed that this vehicle would have to be armored and fully tracked. The result was the Priest, based off of the M3 Lee chassis, mounting an open superstructure and a 105mm gun. In addition to WWII, the Priest would fight in Korea with UN forces, and with Israel in the Six-Day War, War of Attrition and Yom Kippur War. The M7B1 variant uses the M4A3 Sherman chassis instead of the M3 Lee.

9 & 10) M41 Walker Bulldog. American postwar light tank that saw limited service in Korea and Vietnam. Designed to succeed the M24 Chaffee. While the Chaffee was a success, its main gun was not effective enough against well armored opponents. Although the primary mission of a light tank was scouting, the U.S. Army wanted one with more powerful armament. The M41 was the solution, thought it did not exactly fulfill the role of a light tank, and rather fit somewhere inbetween a medium and light tank. While the M41 was an agile and well armed vehicle, it was also noisy, fuel-hungry and heavy enough to cause problems with air transport. In 1952 work began on lighter designs (T71, T92), but those projects came to naught and were eventually abandoned.

Walter Gordon, Floyd Talbert, John Eubanks, unknown, Francis Mellet of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment in the 101st Airborne Division. D-Day