world war ii: us army

Today (06.06.17) marks the 73rd anniversary of Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Normandy.
On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolf Hitler’s crack troops.

“Members of the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) pose at Camp Shanks, New York, before leaving from New York Port of Embarkation on Feb. 2, 1945. The women are with the first contingent of Black American WACs to go overseas for the war effort From left to right are, kneeling: Pvt. Rose Stone; Pvt. Virginia Blake; and Pfc. Marie B. Gillisspie. Second row: Pvt. Genevieve Marshall; T/5 Fanny L. Talbert; and Cpl. Callie K. Smith. Third row: Pvt. Gladys Schuster Carter; T/4 Evelyn C. Martin; and Pfc. Theodora Palmer.”

(AP)

Marlene Dietrich, Bob Hope and Bette Davis - all active in efforts to support US troops during World War II - visiting the Hollywood Hall of Honor at the Hollywood Canteen, a memorial for their colleagues who have enlisted in the US military. Davis points to a photo of Clark Gable, who was a major in the US Army Air Forces.

In honor of Memorial Day: Capt. Oliver Burgess Meredith, United States Army Air Force during World War II. Photo taken at US Army Headquarters in London, June 10th, 1943. This is a photo of Burgess before his assignment to the 8th AF. Notice his Aviation Cadet wings. 

The only fan page solely dedicated to Burgess Meredith // Lovingly ran by his grandniece in attempt to keep his legacy alive.

Members of the ‘Filthy Thirteen’ 101st Airborne, sport Indian-style mohawks and apply war paint to one another before going into battle, June 5, 1944.

The Filthy Thirteen was the name given to the 1st Demolition Section of the Regimental Headquarters Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, of the United States Army, which fought in the European campaign in World War II. The Demolition Section was assigned and trained to demolish enemy targets behind the lines. They were ordered to secure or destroy the bridges over the Douve River during the Normandy Invasion of Europe in June 1944. Half were either killed, wounded or captured, but they accomplished their mission. This unit was best known for the famous photo which appeared in Stars and Stripes, showing two members wearing Indian-style “mohawks” and applying war paint to one another. The inspiration for this came from unit sergeant Jake McNiece, who was part Choctaw.

“Women in the United States Forces in Britain: Hundreds of United States nurses underwent a toughening up course in preparation for the opening of the second front, where their job would be to follow the troops of liberation and establish hospital units. Lieutenant Louise Erman throwing her Ju-Jitsu instructor Major Strom during an unarmed combat class.”

(IWM)

1943: Burgess explains how an English pub differs from American saloons. This educational documentary (which was narrated, written, and co-directed by Burgess) was made to introduce American soldiers to Britain during World War II. 

The only fan page solely dedicated to Burgess Meredith // Lovingly ran by his grandniece in attempt to keep his legacy alive.

A pilot of the 100th Fighter Squadron shows off for the camera, buzzing by a B-24 Liberator as they return from an escort mission. Although it is a myth that the Tuskegee Airmen never lost a single bomber they escorted, they nevertheless had a stellar record in defending their charges with losses well below the average for all P-51 escorts, and were quite popular with Fifteenth Air Force bomber crews.

(Collection of Frank Ambrose)

“General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the order of the Day. "Full victory - nothing else” to paratroopers in England on June 6, 1944, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe. All of the men with General Eisenhower are members of Company E, 502d.“

(US Army)