world war ii: liberation of france

sweetest-garlic  asked:

MY BROTHER IS REALLY SEXIST AND MY DAD IS SLIGHTLY LESS BUT STILL P R O B L E M A T I C AND MY ENGLISH TEACHER SAYS THAT SINGULAR THEY "IS NOT REAL AND NOT TO BE USED" AND IT MAKES ME REALLY MAD AND I JUST WANT TO VENT AND FIND SOME STRONG FEMALE CHARACTERS AND SLAP MY BROTHER IN THE FACE WITH THEM BECAUSE HE SAYS THAT JAMES BOND CAN'T HAVE FEMALE SPIES IN IT AND I'M JUST REALLY, REALLY MAD AND I WANT TO ANGRY CRY

GO AHEAD AND ANGRY CRY. WHILST YOUR BROTHER IS BEING A SEXIST PIG, SLAP HIM WITH SOME REAL FEMALE REALNESS.

This is Eileen Nearne. She was a spy during World War II and at 23 she was dropped by parachute into occupied France to relay messages from the French resistance. She was captured by the Germans, tortured and sent to a concentration camp. But she managed to keep up her story and was moved to a different camp. She managed to escape the camp and hide from the gestapo until the area she was hiding in was liberated. When she passed away in 2010 she was given a hero’s funeral.

SHE’S BADASS. AND WAS A REAL LIFE SPY. SO SHOVE THAT IS YOUR BROTHER’S PIE HOLE.

Check out Virginia Hall. She was wanted by the Gestapo as one of the most dangerous allied spies. She worked for Special Operations Executive (SOE) in Nazi-occupied France in World War II. Having lost her lower leg in 1933, she wore a prosthetic. In 1942, the Germans took direct control of France and Virginia had to leave. She managed to hike all the through the snowy Pyrenees Mountains to Spain on her prosthetic to escape the Nazis. Think about that for a minute. Prosthetics weren’t what they’re like now. This would have been some tough shit. I don’t see James Bond hiking through the snow on a false limb. OH AND. She then returned to France to train and arm guerrilla groups whilst constantly moving around to avoid detection by Nazis - who by this point had issued wanted posters and rewards for the so-called “limping lady”.

JAMES BOND’S GOT NOTHING ON THIS WOMAN.

Meet Nancy Wake. One of the most decorated Allied servicewomen of World War II. Nancy Grace Augusta Wake was known to the Gestapo as ”The White Mouse“ for her ability to evade detection and capture. She was part of the French Resistance and later on in the war joined the Special Operations Executive (SOE). She was parachuted into the Auvergne region of France to provide guerrilla groups with arms. Her compatriots praised her strength and courage, two qualities she needed in abundance when she killed an SS sentry with her bare hands to stop him raising the alarm during a raid. After the war ended, Nancy was awarded the George Medal, the US Presidential Medal Of Freedom, the Médaille de la Résistance and three Croix de Guerres from France.

DON’T TELL ME WOMEN CAN’T BE SPIES BECAUSE I KNOW THEY CAN.

Also, your English teacher is behind the times and in my opinion, totally wrong. Gender is a construct. No-one is born with their gender, they’re born with their sex (literally, the organs you are born with). Gender is something you learn. And should you decide you are not female, or male, or either, then that is your decision. If you want your pronouns to be ‘they’, ‘them’ etc. then so ahead and use that! People are still adjusting to using different pronouns for people. But they will get it eventually. I promise you.

NOW HOLD YOUR HEAD HIGH, USE WHATEVER PRONOUNS YOU DAMN WELL WANT AND STRUT AWAY FROM ALL THAT NEGATIVITY.

Originally posted by gifs-for-the-masses

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🇫🇷💟🇺🇸 On this date June 6, 1944:
The great Franco-American Alliance that existed since the French had fought to help create The United States independence, was continued with the bravery & blood of Allied soldiers that fought to liberate France. This cemetery is located on a bluff overlooking Omaha Beach (one of the landing beaches of the Normandy Invasion) and the English Channel. It covers 172 acres (70 ha), and contains the remains of 9,387 American military dead, most of whom were killed during the invasion of Normandy and ensuing military operations in World War II. Included are graves of Army Air Corps crews shot down over France as early as 1942.

CAROLANDS.ORG

The French Resistance (French: La Résistance française) is the name used to denote the collection of French resistance movements that fought against the Nazi German occupation of France and against the collaborationist Vichy régime during World War II. Résistance cells were small groups of armed men and women (called the Maquis in rural areas), who, in addition to their guerrilla warfare activities, were also publishers of underground newspapers, providers of first-hand intelligence information, and maintainers of escape networks that helped Allied soldiers and airmen trapped behind enemy lines. The men and women of the Résistance came from all economic levels and political leanings of French society, including émigrés; conservative Roman Catholics, including priests; and citizens from the ranks of liberals, anarchists, and communists.

The French Resistance played a significant role in facilitating the Allies’ rapid advance through France following the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, and the lesser-known invasion of Provence on 15 August, by providing military intelligence on the German defenses known as the Atlantic Wall and on Wehrmacht deployments and orders of battle. The Résistance also planned, coordinated, and executed acts of sabotage on the electrical power grid, transportation facilities, and telecommunications networks. It was also politically and morally important to France, both during the German occupation and for decades afterward, because it provided the country with an inspiring example of the patriotic fulfillment of a national imperative, countering an existential threat to French nationhood. The actions of the Résistance stood in marked contrast to the collaboration of the regime based at Vichy.

After the landings in Normandy and Provence, the paramilitary components of the Résistance were organized more formally, into a hierarchy of operational units known, collectively, as the French Forces of the Interior (FFI). Estimated to have a strength of 100,000 in June 1944, the FFI grew rapidly, doubling by the following month, and reaching approximately 400,000 by October of that year.Although the amalgamation of the FFI was, in some cases, fraught with political difficulties, it was ultimately successful, and it allowed France to rebuild the fourth-largest army in the European theatre (1.2 million men) by VE Day in May 1945.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Resistance

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Rare color scenes from the Liberation of Paris, August 25, 1944, including an intact Eiffel Tower flying the French Tricolour, General Charles De Gaulle marching down the Champs Elysees, and Allied troops marching in front of the Arc de Triomphe.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944

From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see World War II from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie PyleJack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway

Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

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The Liberation of Paris

After an uprising by the French Resistance and days of street fighting, Paris is liberated as German occupiers surrender to Allied forces seventy years ago on August 25, 1944.

Excerpted from:
PROGRESS IN SOUTHERN FRANCE (ST. RAPHAEL) [ETC.], 1944

From the series: Motion Picture Films from the “Combat Bulletin” Program Series, 1944 - 1951

FRANCE, Colleville-sur-Mer : US President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande look out over Omaha Beach during the 70th French-American Commemoration D-Day Ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France, June 6, 2014. The D-Day ceremonies on June 6 this year mark the 70th anniversary since the launch of ‘Operation Overlord’, a vast military operation by Allied forces in Normandy, which turned the tide of World War II, eventually leading to the liberation of occupied France and the end of the war against Nazi Germany. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB

An original General Motors FP-45 Liberator clandestine pistol with original box and accessories.

Produced during World War II, these cheap crude pistols were dropped over Europe for use by resistance forces in German occupied France and other territories.  Made from stamped metal, it was a single shot only.  The Liberator was not intended to be bonafide combat weapon, but a simple pistol with which a resistance fighter could use to kill a German soldier, then take his rifle.  The kit includes  a waxed cardboard box with a picture of the pistol mid-discharge on the top, a small wooden dowel rod for ejecting spent cartridges, and a smaller sub-box containing 10 rounds of 45 ACP (7 headstamped “FA 42”), and a 12 panel “comic-strip” instruction sheet covering operation and loading. 

Cost of producing one pistol and kit in 1942: $2.10

Sold at Auction: $4,250

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1.“Stevonovitch II” B-24L-10-FO Liberator, 799th BS, 464th BG, 15th AF, 10 APR 1945 year, near the city of Luda, Italy. The aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft shells and the wing was formed, after some time the plane exploded, the 10 members of the crew were killed, 1 was thrown from the plane and he survived.

2. “Red Bow” B-24M-10-FO Liberator, 714th BS, 448th BG, 8th AF, 4 APR 1945 years, the aircraft was shot down by a missile R4M running the Me-262, the radio operator managed to open the bomb Bay leaf and jump, the rest of the crew were killed

3. “Wee Willie” B-17G-15-BO Flying Fortress 322nd BS, 91st BG, 8th AF, 8 APR 1945 year in a RAID for bombing the railway station of the city of Stendal, Germany. The first plane was damaged by a fighter, and then when shot down by anti-aircraft shell ripped off his wing. The pilot managed to jump out, the rest were killed.

4. Collision B-17G-75-BO, 422nd Bomb Squadron, 305th Bomb Group B-17G-80-BO, 364th Bomb Squadron, 305th Bomb Group, 22nd Oct, ’ 44 years, over England on the way home from the bombing of Hanover, both crew were killed.

5. “Little Warrior” B-24H-20-FO Liberator, 861st Bomb Squadron, 493rd Bomb Group, 8th Air Force, the 29th of June, ’ 44. The photo was taken at the moment when the exploded gas tanks. One crew member managed to jump out, but was shot on the ground, all the rest died.

6. “853” B-24H-15-DT Liberator, 783rd Bomb Squadron, 465th Bomb Group, 15th Air Force, 20 Nov ’ 44 years above the town of Blechhammer, Germany. Anti-aircraft shell tore off a wing, but 5 crew members were able to jump out, the remaining 6 died.

7. “Whizzer II” B-17F-20-VE Flying Fortress, 840th BS, 483rd BG, 15th AF, April, ’ 44 years above the city of NIS, Yugoslavia. The aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft shells, the entire crew was killed.

8. B-24L-5-FO Liberator, 564th BS, 389th BG, 8th AF, 9 March 45th year over Munster, Germany. 10 crew members were killed, 2 were able to jump out.

9. B-24 Liberator crashes over Ploiesti, Romania.

10. B-17 crashes after his anti-aircraft shell tore off a wing, March 28, ’ 44 years over France.

Winning the Battle of the Bulge and the "Battle of the Bulge"

In September of 1944, World War II, Allied forces had advanced across France, liberating Paris and pushing the German Army back.  It was then that Allied planners formulated Operation Market Garden, the last push into Germany through occupied Holland with the purpose of ending the war before Christmas.  Market Garden was a bold plan, but is was doomed to failure due to the arrogance of military planners and an underestimation of enemy capabilities.  Market Garden was a failure, and Allied forces were forced to fall back.  At the same time, south of Market Garden, American forces attempted to push into Southern Germany through the Hurtgen Forest.  The resulting battle turned into a quagmire, with American troops making little progress over the upcoming months.  The failures of Market Garden and Hurtgen Forest led to the Battle of the Bulge at the end of December, a massive German counterattack with the goal of pushing back the Allies and forcing them to come to a compromise.  The Allies believed the German Army was finished, and thus were unprepared for a massive German assault. Caught by surprise, Allied forces were short of winter clothing, food, ammunition, and other supplies. Despite these problems, Allied troops held their ground, falling back but not breaking, until eventually the German assault was halted.  The Battle of Bulge was the German Army’s last major offensive of the war, after which, Allied forces would invade Germany, brining an end to the war.

I have to admit something and be very honest, the past few weeks I haven’t been following my diet and exercise plan very well.  I’ve started falling back into old habits.  I have been slipping and eating bad food, and not exercising.  There were a few reasons for this.  First, I moved into a new apartment.  It was a tough move because I work night shift, and we had to move in the day, and I was awake 24 hours straight. I tried to sleep that night after the move, but even though I was exhausted I still couldn’t sleep, so it was more like 30+ hrs being awake.  It took a few days for me to get back into routine, so I was tired for a while.  Secondly, I got sucked into some ridiculous humbuggery at work, basically a childish temper tantrum between two people I work with.  I had nothing to do with it whatsoever except as a bystander, but somehow I’m being dragged into it and being questioned by management over it even though I’ve made it clear I had nothing to do with it, want to stay impartial and don’t want to get involved.  It has been very stressful, and when I get really stressed I eat. For two days I was binge eating.

I have failed many times before because of things like this. I made a mistake and I would have an attitude that was like, “well, I failed, looks like I can’t do this”.  This time is different.  I recognize that I made a mistake, but mistakes never mean the end, rather, they signify a renewal and new beginning. Instead of giving up, I am working to get back on track, and continue on. Soon I will be starting kick boxing and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. I love fitness expert Jack Lalanne’s motivational speech “Life is a Battlefield”.  To get the things you want in life and achieve your goals, you have to fight for it everyday. Your enemy is yourself, more specifically the negative aspects of yourself; apathy, depression, anger, laziness, bad habits, and negative thoughts. At some point, you will have failures, you will make mistakes.  Just like any great battle, the enemy will make a counter offensive and try to push you back.  But you can’t give up, just because you made a mistake and had some failures. The Allied soldiers had some failures and defeats in the fall and winter of 1944, they were forced to retreat at the Battle of the Bulge, but they never gave up, they never broke and ran.  They dug in their heals, held the line, fought back, overcame adversity, and pressed forward.

In popular media they always show before and after photos, showing some fat or obese person in the before, and a chiseled and buff person after.  These photos don’t tell the whole story, of the hard work and sacrifice, the changing of attitudes and lifestyle necessary to achieve that.  They also don’t tell about the failures that occur, the struggles and setbacks that happen. They just show a perfect narrative, giving the impression that it’s easy, you can get results fast, next week!  If you are trying to lose weight and get fit like me, know this, it will not go perfectly, there will be failures, mistakes, and setbacks. DO NOT let setbacks destroy your passion and drive.  Do not define yourself by past failures.
Failure is not the end, rather, it is a chance to begin again, learn from your mistakes, and move forward. This principle holds true no matter what situation, whether it is a history changing battle, weight loss, your career, relationships, breaking an addiction, sports, or any aspect of life where you are endeavoring to improve yourself.

Never Again 360

FRANCE, Arromanches-les-Bains : Men dressed in vintage World War II US military uniforms stand next to a Willis jeep, on the beach, in the morning in Arromanches, western France, on June 5, 2014, a day before the start of the D-Day commemorations. The D-Day ceremonies on June 6 this year mark the 70th anniversary since the launch of ‘Operation Overlord’, a vast military operation by Allied forces in Normandy, which turned the tide of World War II, eventually leading to the liberation of occupied France and the end of the war against Nazi Germany. AFP PHOTO / LUDOVIC MARIN