world war 2 hero

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Smart, beautiful and deadly, 19 year old Russian sniper Roza Shanina had 54 confirmed kills during World War II.

<<OK so I know for a fact I’ve blogged most of these photos before but I sincerely don’t give a rat’s ass.  I have no qualms about reblogging Ms. Shanina 100 times a day if it suits me…hell, no doubt I could devote a blog entirely to her remarkable accomplishments.  I am totally intrigued and mesmerized by her.  And not simply because she is amazingly beautiful and modest and bold, but also because of the unequivocal expertise she displayed in her “trade”.  Maybe it’s also because she has that certain look about her like she might be just a little too shy to come up and talk to you…and yet have zero reservations about calmly dispatching your ass from 1000 meters.>>

Shanina volunteered for the military after the death of her brother in 1941 and chose to be a marksman on the front line. Praised for her shooting accuracy, Shanina was capable of precisely hitting moving enemy personnel and making doublets (two target hits by two rounds fired in quick succession).


Allied newspapers described Shanina as “the unseen terror of East Prussia”. She became the first Soviet female sniper to be awarded the Order of Glory and was the first servicewoman of the 3rd Belorussian Front to receive it. Shanina was killed in action during the East Prussian Offensive while shielding the severely wounded commander of an artillery unit. Shanina’s bravery received praise already during her lifetime, but came at odds with the Soviet policy of sparing snipers from heavy fights. Her combat diary was first published in 1965.

The Soviets found that sniper duties fit women well, since good snipers are patient, deliberate, have a high level of aerobic conditioning, and normally avoid hand-to-hand combat. They found the same with women as bomber crews, very fine adjustments and intense technical expertise actually gave them a better reputation than most all male bomber squadrons.

Known to most as a talented ballet dancer Franceska Mann was a jewish woman who died in a Nazi concentration camp. But this woman didn’t go out without a fight. 

On October 23, 1943 around 1,700 polish Jews arrived on a train to Auschwitz. before being taken to the gas chambers they had to sanitize and be cleaned off,   Mann started to strip down which caught the eye of a guard. This guard was Josef Schillinger  Whilst he was distracted she grabbed his gun  and shot him dead. Then she shot another guard. Many other woman took this as a signal to rally around her and fight back against their captors.

Next all the prisoners that had escaped the gas chamber changing room were mowed down with machine guns, Mann included. She was only 26. What truly happened that day continues to be a mystery due to forged accounts and warped facts. The only casualties that are known for sure that day are Schillinger, Emmerich(the other guard Mann shot) and all the prisoners, including Mann. 

A lovely military man selling poppies stopped me today and asked if he could reposition mine - while doing so he told me that women should wear their poppy on their right side; the red represents the blood of all those who gave their lives, the black represents the mourning of those who didn’t have their loved ones return home, and the green leaf represents the grass and crops growing and future prosperity after the war destroyed so much. The leaf should be positioned at 11 o'clock to represent the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the time that World War One formally ended. He was worried that younger generations wouldn’t understand this and his generation wouldn’t be around for much longer to teach them
—  ANZAC (kittykatex)

As a rocket-firing LCI lays down a barrage on the already obscured beach on Peleliu, a wave of Alligators (LVTs, or Landing Vehicle Tracked) churn toward the defenses of the strategic island September 15, 1944.

The amphibious tanks with turret-housed cannons went in in after heavy air and sea bombardment. Army and Marine assault units stormed ashore on Peleliu on September 15, and it was announced that organized resistance was almost entirely ended on September 27.

Operation ‘Stalemate II’
The Peleliu operation was code-named Stalemate II, a name that seems ironic in hindsight, because initially the campaign was viewed with relative optimism. The main task of securing the island was given to the 1st Marine Division, a largely veteran unit that had seen action at Guadalcanal and New Britain. The 1st Marine Division consisted of the 1st, 5th, and 7th Marine Regiments (infantry) and the 11th Marines (artillery support).

(AP Photo)

(Colourised by Royston Leonard from the UK)

Widely considered to be the first true resistance fighters of World War 2, Major Henryk “Hubal” Dobrzanski and his 300-strong force were responsible for the destruction of an entire German battalion in the March of 1940. His successes would lead to the Germans fielding nearly 8000 Waffen-SS, Wehrmacht and Panzerkorpsmen in an effort to chase them down. He was killed by ambush on April 30th of the same year, his corpse desecrated and hung up by the German anti-partisan forces. His remaining tiny force would continue the fight until their disbanding by the British SOE in June of 1940.

U.S. paratroopers of the 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division move through Rue Holgate move towards the crossroads with Route #13 in Carentan, Normandy. 12 June 1944.

The Battle of Carentan was an engagement between US airborne forces and the German Wehrmacht during the Battle of Normandy. The battle took place between 10 and 15 June 1944, on the approaches to and within the city of Carentan, France.

Carentan was defended by the 6th Parachute Regiment, two Ost battalions and remnants of other German forces. The 17th SS Panzergrenadier Division, ordered to reinforce Carentan, was delayed by transport shortages and attacks by Allied aircraft.
The 101st Airborne Division, was ordered to seize Carentan.

Carentan captured, 12 June
At 06:00 Carentan was attacked from the north by 1st/401st GIR and the south by 2nd/506th PIR. Both units
encountered machine gun fire from the rear guard, but the 2nd/506th was also sporadically shelled by artillery to
the south of Carentan. Despite this, both units swiftly cleaned out the rear guard in a short fight near the railway
station and met at 07:30 in the centre of town. The 1st/506th PIR engaged in more serious combat south of town
when it had to rescue Col. Sink’s command post, surrounded because it had pushed too far towards the German
lines in the dark.
In the afternoon both the 506th and 501st advanced southwest but after a mile were stopped by heavy contacts with
new German units including a few tanks. The 17th SS Panzergrenadier Division had intended to counterattack to
retake Carentan, but its assault guns were held up in the assembly areas by Allied air attacks. Instead infantry units
dug in on higher ground below the city and battled the paratroopers until dark. (worldwar2-photofinder.com)

(Colourised by Nikos Hatzitsirou from Greece)

Heralded by the success of Superman and Batman, the world of superheroes exploded in the late 1930s with a litany of colorful and often bizarre heroic characters, creating what is revered as The Golden Age of comic books. They defeated evil wherever it reared it’s ugly head, whether it be bloodthirsty Vampires from Pluto, repugnant Nazi jerks, or the mysterious and deadly effects of Atomic Radiation! These heroes sold books by the millions and ushered in an age of unprecedented JUSTICE. But soon, these ring a ding ding good times came to an end at the close of World War 2 as the heroes fell out of favor in the eyes of a giddy and spoiled public. It was curtains for the heroes, as the once successful publishers now faced bankruptcy and took to the giggle juice while their creations fell into the shadow realm of PUBLIC DOMAIN, a place where anyone, anywhere can use them for whatever nefarious deed their sick minds could concoct. GADZOOKS! No longer protected under the shield of copyright laws, these characters were buried and lost to the cruel hands of Father Time and the machismo of modern entertainment, as evil ran unencumbered through our streets!

BUT FEAR NOT, true believers! These heroes are back and better than ever! Reimagined by top creators in the industry, this anthology collects over 20 short stories paying homage and tribute to some of the greatest heroes and heroines lost to time with brand new, never-before-seen, exclusive tales bringing these amazing creations back to life! But don’t blow your wig, Johnny, this book is within your grasp! Get in on this here clambake and help show the world that these characters might have been buried under layers of dust, but they are NOT FORGOTTEN!

Featuring work by James Harren (Rumble, B.P.R.D., Conan), Eric Esquivel (Lego DC Superheroes, Vertigo Quarterly, Adventure Time), Ryan Cody (Doc Unknown, Heavy Metal Magazine, The Phantom), Jerry Gaylord (Bill and Ted’s Triumphant Return, Fanboy Vs Zombies, Ghostbuster/TMNT), Matt Harding (Doctor Mordrid, Popapocalypse, Styx, Madefire Studios), Angela Ahlers, Nathan Shorts (Toejam and Earl: Back in the Groove), Vincent Kukua (Image Comics), Saeed Arjumand (The Haunted Detective), Evan Limberger (Madefire Studios), Matt D. Wilson (Copernicus Jones: Robot Detective, the Supervillain’s Handbook), Rodrigo Vargas, Josh Krach, Ashley V. Robinson (Jupiter Jet, Top Cow Comics), Morgan Beem,  Rica March, Jeffrey and Susan Bridges (Pendant Audio), Leonie O’Moore,  Derik Hefner, Anne-Marie Webb,  Andrew Steers, Edwin Lopez, Bobby Trauma, Esther Pimentel, Greg Menzie, Zakk Saam, Omar Morales (CruZader), Joel Cotejar, Paula Goulart, Jaymes Reed,  Paul Plale, Andres Olveras, Gabriel Moore-Topazio (Wrought Comics, Asylum), Einar V. Másson (Bay Area Comic Anthology, Bruce the Angry Bear),  Mikael Lopez, Kristian Bay Kirk, Sandra Rós Björnsdóttir (Krumla), Kevin Cuffe (Oathbound), Ricardo Lima, Jason Inman (co-host of DC All Access), Nick Robles (Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials), Casey Desilets, Malcolm Johnson (Styx, Ultrasylvania), Kevin Buckley (Madefire Studios, Cyberwulf), Jeff Leeds, Marco Maccagni (Archon, Vampblade), DC Hopkins (We Can Never Go Home, Trespasser), Valentina Pucci (Action Lab), Angela Fato (Action Lab), Jared Rosmarin, Eugene Young, and Dave Harding.

Reviving and re-imagining characters and stories such as The Scarlet Avenger, Atomic Tot, Terena of the Tundra, Airmale, Cannibal Planets, Lucky 13, Owlgirl, Marvelo, Black Terror, Moon Girl, Ozmar the Mystic, Super Ann, Master Mystic, Airboy, The Iron Skull, The Atomic Man, Mars Mason the Intergalactic Postman, The Black Knight, Jet Powers and more.

March 26, 1944 light tank T-70, noticing the two approaching German tank, camouflaged in the Bush and took them on sight. After the Panthers approached to 150-200 meters and framed by the impact of a Board, T-70 suddenly from ambush opened fire and destroyed both enemy tanks. The commander of the T-70 of Lieutenant A. Pegov was promoted to the rank of Hero of the Soviet Union.

In Burma on 23 June 1944, a Battalion of the 6th Gurkha Rifles was ordered to attack the Railway Bridge at Mogaung. Immediately the attack developed the enemy opened concentrated and sustained cross fire at close range from a position known as the Red House and from a strong bunker position two hundred yards to the left of it.

The cross fire was so intense that both the leading platoons of ‘B’ Company, one of which was Rifleman Tulbahadur Pun’s, were pinned to the ground and the whole of his Section was wiped out with the exception of himself, the Section commander and one other man. The Section commander immediately led the remaining two men in a charge on the Red House but was at once badly wounded. Rifleman Tulbahadur (sic) Pun and his remaining companion continued the charge, but the latter too was immediately wounded.

Rifleman Tulbahadur Pun then seized the Bren Gun, and firing from the hip as he went, continued the charge on this heavily bunkered position alone, in the face of the most shattering concentration of automatic fire, directed straight at him. With the dawn coming up behind him, he presented a perfect target to the Japanese. He had to move for thirty yards over open ground, ankle deep in mud, through shell holes and over fallen trees.

Despite these overwhelming odds, he reached the Red House and closed with the Japanese occupants. He killed three with his rifle and further five with his kukri knife.

— 

Victoria Cross citation for Ghurka Tul Bahadur Pun, issued in 1944

The citation did not mention that after clearing the house he grabbed a flamethrower and killed a further thirty Japanese troops who were in a locked bunker. He described it as “appropriate reparations”

Hero of the Soviet Union, Nikolai Yakolevich Illyin who killed 216 enemy soldier’s in Stalingrad. He was killed in 1943 at Donbass. While dying Illyin said “pass my rifle to Afanasi” (Afanasi Gordienko his best friend since Stalingrad) Afanasi took Illyins rifle and swore to avenge his death,but not much longer Afanasi was also killed in action. Their rifle that they died with, an M91/30 with PU scope, can be seen today in the Moscow armed forces museum.