world record jump

Requested by @theimaginatorifunny and anonymously

There’s a special place in my heart for Blaziken, the first pokémon I ever received when I started playing my first pokemon game (Look at me now, Professor Birch). Blaziken was the original fire-fighting type starter before it was cool, and with its strong legs, fierce kicks, and recent Mega-evolution it is quite the force to be reckoned with.

According to the pokédex, Blaziken can jump over a 30-story building in one leap. 30 stories is roughly 90 meters, or 300 feet. This is nearly 50 times Blaziken’s own height. The world record high-jump held by a human is a 2.45 meters (8 feet). There must be something going on here other than a simple jump. So what makes Blaziken such a high flier?

We’re going to start small, by looking at a creature with a maximum jump height of 18 cm (7 inches). At first this would seem pathetic, until you realize this creature is flea, who is barely 3mm tall themselves. Fleas can jump 100 times their own height.

Jumping this height takes a lot of energy, and a lot of push. Part of their magic lies in a special pad in their legs, made of a springy protein called resilin. This leg-pad stores energy during their jump. While the flea is bending it’s legs and starting a jump, the energy isn’t going directly into pushing the flea off of the ground. Instead, the energy is being stored in the leg-pads, “charging up” to be released all at once, kicking it high and fast upwards. Some studies report this sudden acceleration to be over 400 times the acceleration of gravity.

The rest of the question, then, is how they get that energy into the resilin. The answer is the flea’s knees, and if you thought bee’s knees were cool, fleas have “multi-jointed” hind legs. It can push with its toe, its shin, and its knees, which together act as a lever to store all of that energy into the resilin pads. It was shown that a flea’s lower leg, the toe and shin, are covered in tiny claws used for gripping the ground. In other words, while jumping, the flea actually holds onto the ground as tightly as it can, which allows it to store up enough energy to jump to great heights.

Blaziken is a bit larger than a flea, but the idea is still the same. In order to jump a 30-story building, Blaziken’s legs must be able to store up a large amount of energy before sudden release – 45,864 Joules (11 Calories) of energy to be exact, if Blaziken wants to jump 30 stories high (assuming perfect efficiency). This is basically the energy you spend from running or weight-training for a minute nonstop, only Blaziken does it in seconds. It can only get that much energy by gripping onto the ground tightly before its launch.

Blaziken’s legs must contain spring-like tendons made of resilin, which stores up energy before a jump. Blaziken grips tightly to the ground when pushing off of it, and while doing so “charges up” the resilin pads, releasing the energy all at once when Blaziken jumps.

i’m still thinking about the fact that both yuuri and victor could very definitely re-break yurio’s short program world record with their jump arsenal and usual level of PCS points and just cackling imagining the tug of war over the SP WR next season as it’s constantly bounced back and forth among the three of them. no one cares any more when someone breaks it. the russians and japan’s ace do it again. this is the second time this week. the news outlets are so tired. figure skating commentators can’t bring themselves to pretend to be excited any more. let’s just talk about why victor nikiforov can’t stop kissing yuuri katsuki’s medals when they’re still sitting on the goddamn podium

Canadian Attempts World Record Jump in Denim Suit

While having fun with friends, Larry Enticer decided to break out his snowmobile and attempt a world record.

The Canadian native built a ramp out of snow and donned his denim suit for the feat. Although Larry didn’t stick the landing, his friends seemed to enjoy the stunt. Credit: larry enticer via Storyful