working in brussels

Winter In Flanders

Valerius De Saedeleer 

.

From Wiki:  Valerius De Saedeleer (1867 - 1941)    The artist Valerius De Saedeleer was born on August 4 in the Belgian city of Aalst in 1867.De Saedeleer received his first artistic training at the Gent Academy of Fine Arts of Theodore Joseph Canneel (1817-1892). He mainly painted the river Lys (Leie) and the Flemish Ardennes and was one of the major figures of the first group of the Latem School. Painter, draughtsman, etcher of landscapes, mills, riverviews, snowy landscapes in the Symbolist, Intimist, Post-Impressionist style and in some paintings Art Nouveau elements. De Saedeleer lived from November 1895 to October 1898 in Lissewege and from 1898 to 1908 in Sint-Martens-Latem. The river Lys (Leie) bight there in the subjet of some of his paintings. Then he moved to Etikhove, where an artist colony with him as the central figure was located. Valerius De Saedeleer died on 16 September in 1941 in Leupegem - Work in Museum: Brussel, Antwerpen, Gent, Aalst Deinze, Deurle.“  

I wanted to take her around the fucking world.
I wanted to walk hand-in-hand with her along the Seine, to smell fresh bread baking in Brussels, to sip one-hundred-year-old-wine in Italy, to swim naked together under a Spanish moonlight and sit with eyes locked in a cosy German café on a cold day in December, watching her talk and laugh and tell me she loved me.
I wanted to give her the world, because to me, she was the world.
—  Jamie L. Harding.
youtube

So Djino, a member of my French conlanging forum, works on a train around Brussels. Last week he had fun with the announcements. Esperanto, Elko, Aneuvian, iNedjena… and here, somewhere, my own Ɣu.

The text is as follows: Ao cíoɣle, niklúɣi Brussels Airport - Zaventem mulómouzoka. Tuzél vaɣ vel kititíhtolim. Kikló názi eim ivéote so ei mulómouzoka ei avjêtoɣihka an.

I’m very satisfied with his prononciation, it’s quasi-perfect for a first-timer.

Can you find the relevant segment?

Born near Brussels in 1916, nurse-in-training Andrée de Jongh was just 24 years old when Belgium was invaded by German forces in 1940. As Nazi troops invaded Brussels, de Jongh comforted her distraught father by saying, “You’ll see what we’ll do to them. You’ll see, they are going to lose this war. They started it, but they are going to lose it.”

While working as a nurse in Brussels, de Jongh became aware of the fact that Allied soldiers and airmen were trapped behind German lines. De Jongh created a series of safe houses around the city where these servicemen could safely await escort out of the country along a complicated route through France and Spain and on to Britain.

De Jongh herself became a primary escort, couriering Allied soldiers on the dangerous route. She persuaded British intelligence agency MI9 to provide financial and logistical backing. This network became known as “Comet,” and was one of the most successful escape lines for Allied soldiers during the war. 

In 1943, de Jongh was captured by the Gestapo while escorting three Royal Air Force servicemen. She was interrogated and tortured, and admitted to being the head of the Comet network in an effort to save her colleagues. De Jongh was incarcerated at the Mathausen and Ravensbruck concentration camps, but the network she formed survived until Belgium was liberated by the Allies in 1944. In all, the Comet network escorted between 500 and 800 Allied servicemen from behind Nazi lines to safety. 

De Jongh survived her concentration camp experience, though many of her colleagues on the Comet network were killed, including her father. In 1946, de Jongh received the British George Medal, the American Medal of Freedom, and the French Legion d’honneur. In her home country, she was appointed a Chevalier of the Order of Leopold and received the Croix de Guerre. 

De Jongh returned to nursing, working at a leper colony in the Belgian Congo and later at a hospital in Ethiopia. She was made a countess in 1985. She died in Brussels in 2007, at the age of 91.

[Sources: Obituary published in The Guardian; Obituary published in The Telegraph“Andree de Jongh,” Wikipedia; Women Heroes of World War II, by Kathryn J. Atwood.] 

Adorable

So here’s a little one shot for ya! A bit of fluffy fun. Want to thank @mizjoely for her help, she is fabulous! It’s rated G+ and can also be found on FF.net and AO3. Enjoy ~Lil~


Where’d that come from? Sherlock wondered as he watched Molly strain a bit to dig further into the corpse on the slab. She was concentrating so hard that little lines had formed on her forehead and her tongue was sticking out, just a bit. He continued to watch her facial expressions change under the protective plastic shield as he tried to figure out where the hell that word had come from.

After a few more minutes she looked up and spoke. “Here we are. Just as I thought. By the colour of the tissue…” she said, launching into her findings. Sherlock, however, barely listened; he was far too distracted by his previous thought.

How could I possible find Molly Hooper adorable? And, more importantly, since when do I use that word? He dipped into his mind palace to try to find references to it in the past but was quickly pulled out by the pathologist shaking his arm.

“Are you even paying attention to me?” she asked, sounding put out. “I rushed to get this done for you and you’re just drifting off.”

He panicked for a moment, not remembering what she’d said about the cause of death. “I’ll… need a copy of the autopsy report to take to Lestrade.”

Molly made a face, a rather ador… NO! She just made a face. “Why? You usually just fly out of the room once I agree with you.”

Ah. He’d been right about the poisoning. Of course I was right.

“I won’t have the tox screen though, understand,” she added. “I can’t even speculate on the report.”

He still needed more information, presumably the information she’d imparted while he was ‘drifting off’. “I’m aware,” he said flatly. “The report, Molly. There’s a murderer loose.” Not really. He was fairly certain the murderer was the man that had been found unconscious at the scene and was now resting comfortably (though restrained) in a bed upstairs. The idiot had slipped on some spilled water on the floor and knocked himself out. God, did I call this a six? It’s not even a four. Why did I agree to this one? You got excited at the chance to see Molly! You hadn’t been here for three days… sentimental fool! his treacherous brain reminded him. He shook himself.

Molly huffed. “The things I do for you, you insufferable man. Let me put him away and clean up and I can give you a preliminary report. It won’t be complete.”

He stood there watching and getting more uncomfortable as the minutes dragged on. “Would you… like some coffee?” he asked, just for a reason to leave, now that he had to wait for the report.

She looked up, surprised. “Ah, I’d prefer tea, if you don’t mind. Three…”

He interrupted her with the wave of his hand. “I know how you take your tea. I’ll be back shortly,” he said on his way out the door.

What the hell is going on? He never got distracted like this during a case. Admittedly this case was pathetically easy. He hadn’t even needed or wanted, come to think of it, John’s help this time. Upon receiving Lestrade’s text he had it half figured out, then rushed out the door eager to see Molly and confirm his deduction.

Or eager to solve the case? Eager to see Molly? Now he wasn’t quite sure. He continued to contemplate the situation as he made his way to the canteen.

Keep reading

Valerius De Saedeleer , 1931

.

From Wiki:  Valerius De Saedeleer (1867 - 1941)    The artist Valerius De Saedeleer was born on August 4 in the Belgian city of Aalst in 1867.De Saedeleer received his first artistic training at the Gent Academy of Fine Arts of Theodore Joseph Canneel (1817-1892). He mainly painted the river Lys (Leie) and the Flemish Ardennes and was one of the major figures of the first group of the Latem School. Painter, draughtsman, etcher of landscapes, mills, riverviews, snowy landscapes in the Symbolist, Intimist, Post-Impressionist style and in some paintings Art Nouveau elements. De Saedeleer lived from November 1895 to October 1898 in Lissewege and from 1898 to 1908 in Sint-Martens-Latem. The river Lys (Leie) bight there in the subjet of some of his paintings. Then he moved to Etikhove, where an artist colony with him as the central figure was located. Valerius De Saedeleer died on 16 September in 1941 in Leupegem - Work in Museum: Brussel, Antwerpen, Gent, Aalst Deinze, Deurle.”  

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.
— 

Elizabeth Bennet - Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

A quote has never felt more accurate after a day like today

“Funeral in London May 1919: the coffin containing the body of Nurse Edith Cavell leaving Westminster Abbey for the burial in "Life’s Green” at Norwich Cathedral.

“Edith Cavell worked in Brussels at a nursing school but after the occupation of Brussels by the German Army in 1914 she became involved in helping allied soldiers reach the safety of neutral Holland. On 4 August 1915 she was arrested and charged with helping allied soldiers to escape. After a Court Martial she was executed by firing squad on 12 October 1915 at the Champ de Tir in Brussels. She met her death with outstanding courage and dignity and was nationally honoured by a state funeral in London before her final burial in Norwich Cathedral.”

(IWM)

Terrorist attack in Brussels

Brussels has just been attacked. People, probably terrorists (it hasn’t been confirmed yet) have bombed the airport and a metro station. 25 people died and a lot of people are injured. Brussels is in lockdown, the train stations are closed, public transportation is closed and most of the people are stuck (they can’t go home). The terror alert level has been raised to 4, it’s the highest of our country. Everyone has to stay inside.

My heart goes out to all the victims and their families. This happened 20 minutes away from where I live, it’s so scary and surreal. A lot of my friends live, study & work in Brussels and I hope everyone stays safe. I have a feeling this is just the beginning…

-Daeny