working at the zoo

Today I walk into work and there are a ton of people in my building and it’s kind of a mess and everyone is talking and I sort of just blurt out:

“Man, it’s a zoo in here!”

Everyone stopped and looked at me as though I had 2 heads.

Then I realized.

I work at a zoo.

5

Throwing it back to 2012 and 2 bundles of jaguar joy. 😻😻 As jaguar numbers decline, each birth in the Species Survival Plan (SSP) helps to establish an assurance population for animals in danger of becoming extinct. Wild jaguars are in serious trouble. Over 30% of the rain forests they call home have been destroyed—and when the rain forests disappear, jaguars disappear. Even though we’re hard at work at the San Diego Zoo, we’re also busy on the front lines of jaguar conservation. Be a hero for wildlife and support our efforts: http://bit.ly/SDZGWCjag

Just Keep Swimming AU

Character A has been working at a zoo for magical creatures for a few years as a sanitation worker, and has been warned time and time again to never go near the tanks at the far end of the enclosure. However, one day Character A is at the zoo after hours and hears the most beautiful sound they’ve ever heard. The noise leads Character A to the tanks, where they are greeted by a stunning creature swimming around, as if looking for something.
When the creature notices Character A, they sigh in relief and say, “Please, I’ve been here, away from my family, for years. I need you to help me escape.”

yes, i think the zoo logic works as a metaphor for homeworld. steven is kind of the “rose” of the episode - the first one to question “but what if i don’t want to listen to the voices?”.

Originally posted by centipeetle-dee

of course, nobody gets him. the voices provide for us! they do everything to make us happy, as long as we listen! you should want to listen to the voices!

but that doesn’t work when what you want isn’t what the voices want. the voices are trying, yes, but people are not the same. not every gem wants to fulfill their purpose, unlike what the diamonds might think.

and that’s good! that ties into a huge theme of the whole show: safety and consistency vs change and freedom. 

having one, defined purpose can be reassuring for some - as long as you do that, you’re gonna be safe. nothing will ever change, others will provide for you and you’ll always know what you’re supposed to do. nothing will ever hurt or be scary. everything is safe and predictable.

Originally posted by doafhat

others don’t want that. they want to take risks and see what else life has to offer. abandoning your “purpose” means cutting ties with that safety net, and in the crystal gems’ case, you might even have to fight for freedom. 

this will scare the old society - what if others follow suit, and the whole system falls apart because nobody will follow orders or do their job? 

suddenly, you have a gem war on your hands. 

anonymous asked:

what is your opinion of taking the last of the species in the wild and putting them into zoos with the goal of eventually reintroducing there future offspring back into the wild

Very interesting question, theres examples where this worked but also some where this didnt worked

Where it worked

Przewalski’s horse (Equus ferus

After 1945 only two captive populations of the Prezwalki’s horse in zoos remained, in Munich and in Prague. By the end of the 1950s, only 12 individual Przewalski’s horses were left in the world. In 1977, the Foundation for the Preservation and Protection of the Przewalski horse was founded in Rotterda, the Foundation started a program of exchange between captive populations in zoos throughout the world to reduce inbreeding, and later began a breeding program of its own. As a result of such efforts, the extant herd has retained a far greater genetic diversity than its genetic bottleneck made likely.

In 1992, sixteen horses were released into the wild in Mongolia, followed by additional animals later on. One of the areas to which they were reintroduced became Khustain Nuruu National Park in 1998. Another reintroduction site is Great Gobi B Strictly Protected Area, located at the fringes of the Gobi desert. Lastly, in 2004 and 2005, 22 horses were released by the Association Takh to a third reintroduction site in the buffer zone of the Khar Us Nuur National Park, in the northern edge of the Gobi ecoregion.

Since 2011, Prague Zoo has transported twelve horses to Mongolia in three rounds and it plans to continue to return horses to the wild in the future. The Zoo has the longest uninterrupted history of breeding of Przewalski’s horses in the world and keeps the studbook of this species.

The reintroduced horses successfully reproduced, and the status of the animal was changed from “extinct in the wild” to “endangered” in 2005. On the IUCN Red List, they were reclassified from “extinct in the wild” to “critically endangered” after a reassessment in 2008 and from “critically endangered” to “endangered” after a 2011 reassessment.

California condor (Gymnogyps californianus

Condor numbers dramatically declined in the 20th century due to poaching, lead poisoning, and habitat destruction. A conservation plan was put in place by the United States government that led to the capture of all the remaining wild condors which was completed in 1987, with a total population of 27 individuals. These surviving birds were bred at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park and the Los Angeles Zoo. Numbers rose through captive breeding and, beginning in 1991, condors were reintroduced into the wild. The California condor is one of the world’s rarest bird species: as of December 2015 there are 435 condors living wild or in captivity.

Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx

The Phoenix Zoo and the Fauna and Flora Preservation Society of London are credited with saving the Arabian oryx from extinction. In 1962, these groups started the first captive-breeding herd in any zoo, at the Phoenix Zoo, sometimes referred to as “Operation Oryx”. Starting with 9 animals, the Phoenix Zoo has had over 240 successful births. From Phoenix, oryx were sent to other zoos and parks to start new herds.

Arabian oryx were hunted to extinction in the wild by 1972. By 1980, the number of Arabian oryx in captivity had increased to the point that reintroduction to the wild was started. The first release, to Oman, was attempted with oryx from the San Diego Wild Animal Park. Although numbers in Oman have declined, there are now wild populations in Saudi Arabia and Israel, as well. One of the largest populations is found in Mahazat as-Sayd Protected Area, a large, fenced reserve in Saudi Arabia, covering more than 2000 km2.

In June 2011, the Arabian oryx was relisted as vulnerable by the IUCN Red List. The IUCN estimated more than 1,000 Arabian oryx in the wild, with 6,000–7,000 held in captivity worldwide in zoos, preserves, and private collections.

Where it didnt work

Thylacin (Thylacinus cynocephalus)

The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger or the Tasmanian wolf. Native to continental Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea, it is believed to have become extinct in the 20th century

The last captive thylacine, later referred to as “Benjamin”, was trapped in the Florentine Valley by Elias Churchill in 1933, and sent to the Hobart Zoo where it lived for three years. The thylacine died on 7 September 1936. It is believed to have died as the result of neglect—locked out of its sheltered sleeping quarters, it was exposed to a rare occurrence of extreme Tasmanian weather: extreme heat during the day and freezing temperatures at night.

Quagga (Equus quagga quagga

The Quagga was an extinct subspecies of plains zebra that lived in South Africa until the 19th century.

After the Dutch settlement of South Africa began, the quagga was heavily hunted as it competed with domesticated animals for forage. While some individuals were taken to zoos in Europe, breeding programs were unsuccessful. The last wild population lived in the Orange Free State, and the quagga was extinct in the wild by 1878. The last captive specimen died in Amsterdam on 12 August 1883.

So you see this can go either way but i would say overall if it helps the species im for it because nature conservation is very important to me

anonymous asked:

How do you like keeping arboreals as opposed to ground living snakes? Is it a lot harder?

I wouldn’t say it’s necessarily harder; it just has its own set of challenges. Arboreal snakes tend to have different issues come up regarding husbandry and enrichment–for example, when I rescued my Amazon tree boa, the guy who abandoned her said she would never perch and that’s why he didn’t want her (along with the horrible mite infestation she came with).

It turned out she just didn’t like the perches he was providing her and once I gave her something that allowed her more points of contact, she started perching during the day a lot more. Animals seldom do things for no reason and part of being a good keeper is trying to troubleshoot these problems from the animal’s perspective.

Arboreal snakes also tend to behave a little differently in regards to handling. In my experience they tend to be more alert and high strung (this doesn’t necessarily mean aggressive, it might just mean you need to pay more attention to where your fingers are moving around when you handle them to avoid startling them). Treating mites on arboreals can be a bigger ordeal since I’ve found that they’re more susceptible to getting stressed by the bathing process.

I practice what I call “husbandry handling” with my ATB because she’s a slightly nervous animal who prefers not to be handled often–however, I need to be able to do it with as little fuss and stress as possible in case she ever got sick or injured and needed hands-on medical treatment. This basically means I take her out on a regular basis and practice touching gently all over her body in the ways I might need to in order to provide medical assistance, but try to make it as stress-free and short as possible. She prefers to be a hands-off pet, and that’s fine! She’s still pretty chill for an ATB and I’m grateful she’s tolerant of husbandry handling.

Holly, on the other hand, is very laid back and doesn’t mind being handled. I’ve met CBB chondros that were much more nervous and didn’t like handling at all, so this seems to be a matter of individual temperament. She had an infected tooth last year from hitting the tongs and I was able to get in her mouth to treat it with relatively little fuss and stress for her.

This got a lot longer than I meant it to, so I guess the TL;DR version is that keeping arboreals is definitely different, but not necessarily harder if you have the experience and resources to do it properly. I’ve only kept chondros and Amazon tree boas though as far as arboreals go so that’s about all I can speak for.

Random One Line Prompts

- “You made me cookies?”
- “Everything we stand for ment nothing after all.”
- “You stole what?”
- “You aren’t pathetic.”
- “A dragon ate your homework?”
- “I was suppose die you dumb ass!”
- “You looked at me differently.”
- “You work at a zoo now? Neat.”
- “I’m being dead serious. I’m a vampire.”
- “I’m not pregnant!”
- “So instead of being normal, you started a revolution?”
- “You found a child?”
- “Oh c'mon you would have murdered that guy too.”
- “The stars are pretty tonight, aren’t they?”
- “You ever seen something as cool as this?”
- “You never did understand the concept of being wrong.”
- “So wait- hold up- you’re a mermaid?”
- “I thought you were dead!”
- “I know you love me and all but stop threatening the doctor.”
- “How. THE FUCK. Are you- so motherfucking tall?”
- “Did you just? You just- oh my god!”
- “Everywhere I go there is this crow! I’m telling you!”
- “ You fell in love with a vampire prince and didn’t bother to tell me?”
- “I shit you not.”
- “You? You know how to shoot a gun?”
- “My man, I am high as a kite right now.”
- “You aren’t leaving here without telling me who hurt you so I can take out a can of whoop ass and unleash it on their ass!”
- “You just kissed me.”
- “But you hate avocados.”
- “I may be a vampire but I am a vampire of the sun, not the moon.”
- “Hold up- just stop- just- what are you actually doing? It’s 2 AM!”

inkdropfox  asked:

As a trans guy who works in zoos and very much enjoys your blog, I might have to disagree with your current discussion just a little? While it IS very important to separate gender/sex and animals/humans, I think it's important to let the LGBT community find solace in animals displaying LGBT-representational behavior. Especially when many anti-LGBT people use the excuse "it's not natural" or "you have a disorder", it's very nice to be able to point to animals as "examples" or for our comfort?

(This ask is in response to this post on if animals can be bi). I’ve taken forever responding to this because I wanted to sit down with a trans friend who does activism/education on LGBT issues and hash out a) am I being shitty about this and b) if no, how do I actually say what I mean because getting myself out of science lingo when things cross over into social issues is something I struggle with. 

(I am very specifically not addressing trans/intersex animals in this post. I need to do more research and chat with people about that topic to get the wording correct first).

You’re absolutely right. It’s really important to say yes, in nature, there are animals that have sex / pair bond with / go through courtship behavior with animals of the same sex, or both sexes, or are uninterested in sex. This is absolutely a thing that occurs in nature, and while there are some species for which this is not species-typical behavior there are also species in which it is totally inherent in the normal behavioral repertoire. In terms of representation, yeah, it exists all over the animal kingdom and that’s absolutely worth acknowledging. 

I feel like there’s an important differentiation, though, between talking about is  ‘this animal’s existence is similar to / analogous to mine’ and projecting a human experience of that state of existence onto those animals. That’s where discussions about bi/gay animals start getting frustrating for me, as someone whose goal as an educator is to teach accurate behavioral science and remove anthropomorphism from how people think about animals. 

The really important parts of how people experience identity or how society reacts to someone’s identity (sexual attraction, isolation for not being heteronormative, for example) are too fundamentally tied up in being human to be correct for other taxa. We don’t know if animals have a sense of gender, or if they experience sexual attraction to conspecifics in any way other than an instinctual preference for specific indicators of fertility and quality, and I don’t think I’ve ever heard of an animal that was treated any differently by conspecifics as a result of who it tried to have sex with. When we assume animals experience being bi/gay/ace the way humans do, we basically invalidate all the ways their species-specific experiences and internal states would affect how they perceive and interact with the world. 

Tl;dr, bi/gay/ace animals definitely exist in a social/behavioral sense, but it’s really important to not assume that they have the same experience as a bi/gay/ace human. 

that episode was unsettling. the gems probably didn’t had bad intentions with the humans… but they only have a bare-bones understanding of what they need. they have no concept of the difference between “happy” and “healthy” - my dogs will be happy if i feed them chocolate, but that doesn’t mean it’s good for them. 

humans need to experience pain and consequences. they need to be in more than one place. they need choices. gems don’t… get that. because it doesn’t apply to them, and hey, they seem happy enough! just tell them to obey the little voices!

except they have no understanding of their own emotions. greg rejects them? they lunge for him and bawl their eyes out. they become creatures of pure emotion, who haven’t been taught to logically work through those feelings, or empathize with the person saying no. 

basically, the zoo is… a zoo. their current environment might be “safe”, but it’s put them in a state where they don’t know how to survive without it. 

today was not a very good training day.

This is Lety, one of our female tamanduas, hanging out in her nest box. This is but a small portion of her entire habitat. The portion she very much so prefers to stay in.

Lety is an education ambassador for my zoo. We take her out for special presentations to teach people about the dangers tamanduas face in the wild. Did you know more than half of the tamandua imported into the US die within the first year? They require very special care that your average person will not have the resources for. Please do not try to keep tamanduas as pets.

     “I just did eight and a half years in federal prison.“
     “What was the worst thing about it?”
     “The racial tension.”
     “What else was really bad?”
     “The guards. They hate prisoners. If you hate children, would you work at a kindergarten? If you hate animals, would you work at a zoo? Why work in prison if you hate prisoners?”
     “What do they do?”
     “They mess with your mind, try to break you down: cold room, one blanket.”
     “You think they do it on purpose?”
     “Why else would they do it? They know you’ll be cold. They know it will mess with your head. That’s just one small example—there’re many other things. If you don’t find a way to keep yourself sane, you’re going to re-enter society as a nutjob, a weirdo, messed up—all of the above. It’s called a correctional institution, but their goal is to mess you up: the guards, the system, they want you back.”
     “What do you do to stay normal?”
     “You think about your family—but some guys don’t have families.”

Scranton, PA

RFA + Saeran at the Zoo

Requested by someone: Sorry! Tumblr deleted our messages, so we hope this is what you wanted! 



Zen:

  • He wanted to take you to see different beasts ;)
  • He has to wear a hat and a mask to make sure you aren’t disturbed by fans
  • Complains that his selfies with animals aren’t as nice as they could’ve
  • Whenever they get to the bigger, scarier animals, he comes behind you and hand bites you
  • You scream in surprise and he gushes at how cute it was
  • By the fiftieth time, you’re getting really annoyed
  • You lose him in the penguin section
  • “MC! Look at them waddling! So cute!”
  • He imitates their walk and people stare, but you think it’s so cute
  • Buys you a stuffed wolf
  • Howls and nuzzles you with it
  • Gets flustered when you say you’re going to name it after him

Yoosung:

  • You take him here as a surprise
  • Because he absolutely adores animals, and is studying to become a vet…good gift, right?
  • Lights up like a puppy as soon as you get there
  • There’s a photo booth with a green screen letting you take pictures with different animals
  • Yoosung was unfortunate and wore a green shirt, effectively making him a floating head
  • He’s so bummed, but you have to suppress your laughter
  • He rattles off a bunch of facts about all the animals
  • He’s high-key trying to impress you and show he’s been studying
  • Both of your phone storage gets full by the end
  • He has hundreds of pictures of animals, and you have hundreds of pictures of him looking at animals
  • You might take him to the zoo every week because him around animals is just soo cute

Jaehee:

  • She’s been really stressed with work lately and finally has a weekend off
  • A new zoo opened up in town, and she says she hasn’t gone since she was a very little girl
  • You immediately get tickets
  • She’s a little hesitant and weird at first, because she feels out of place
  • Then she gets to hold a koala
  • She has a new found love for animals and gets very interested in all of them
  • She compares all the animals to Zen
  • Her favorite animal, she finds, is the peacock (you wonder why)
  • While she’s occupied, you buy her a peacock bobble head and planner for her office
  • She proclaims they are now her most prized possessions–next to her DVD collection

Jumin:

  • He googled “cute date ideas” and the zoo came up (dork)
  • Tells you to get dressed
  • “Wear something wild” he says.
  • “What????”
  • He actually forgoes the three piece suit for once…instead wearing only a button up and a tie.
  • The tie has paw prints on it
  • When you get to the zoo, you finally understand his comment earlier about dressing wild.
  • He’s a bit smug when you find humor in his joke
  • He buys those passes where you can go behind the glass and pet certain animals
  • He’s a bit disappointed when they won’t let him pet a tiger
  • “I’m really good with cats though.”
  • You convince Jumin to get those animal hats
  • You take so many pictures of him in monkey ears
  • He buys you a HUGE stuffed animal
  • Also brings home a few souvenirs for Elizabeth the 3rd since she couldn’t accompany you…this time


Seven:

  • You get home after a long day at work
  • There’s a note on the counter and a small, pink bag
  • The note says, “They say you should buy something you wanna see your girl in. ;) See you at 3pm, babe.”
  • You’re a bit nervous and check the bag
  • Inside is a t-shirt half a tiger on it and accompanying tiger ears
  • You wear it and when he comes to pick you up, you see he’s also wearing the ears…and a shirt with the other half of the tiger on it
  • A few selfies later, you’re off to the zoo
  • It was literally like you two were the only one in the zoo with you having your own little conversations
  • Selfies with all the animals
  • You both pitch in to buy Saeran a stuffed hyena with a button to press to make it laugh

Saeran:

  • He needed to get away from his enthusiastic brother for the day
  • You’re both casually eating ice cream and see a sign promoting the new zoo
  • Since you both were free–and he was in no rush to get home–you decide to go
  • He’s actually really fascinated by all of them
  • You take a bunch of pictures of him staring at them, his mouth hanging open
  • They have a dolphin show that day
  • The only seats open are the splash zone
  • You. Get. Soaked.
  • Although, he tried to protect you from a few of the larger splashes
  • You really want to get something matching from the gift shop, but not being too flashy
  • He picks out turtle bracelets for you both
  • They’re so cute, and he’ll never tell you but he rarely takes it off 

WADTT has been covering more zoo / sanctuary / animal rights politics than usual lately, and I want to talk to you guys about why I think that’s so important. (I also realize that it does dominate the feed some days, and I’m working hard to make sure I’m still posting a good percentage of pet and general behavior blogging for those of you primarily here for that).

If you’ve been following this blog for very long, you probably know how much I adore good zoos - I’ve worked in them, I write about them, and I will happily explain the inner workings of them to death if you ask. I’ve seen good zoos do amazing things for conservation. I’ve watched my colleagues achieve incredible training milestones with animals people had given up on. I’ve seen how much impact a zoo visit can have on both kids and adults. I wholeheartedly support the existence of zoos. I also think it is incredibly important that the public really understand how they work and what makes them tick. You love animals. You (maybe) visit zoos that care for them. As guests, you deserve to know what they do well, what they’re still not great at, and what politics are at play. It’s also really important to note that visitor feedback plays a big role in keeping zoos accountable for the continued improvement of their practices and be transparent.

I’ve been talking more about the politics surrounding the zoo field lately because I am really, genuinely terrified by what I see coming down the pipelines in terms of radical animal rights influence in the next couple years. I’ve been observing the patterns of behavior in the AR movement, I’ve been reading the history, I’ve been studying the driving philosophy. What’s scarier is that I’ve been watching my colleagues and my friends and my mentors in the field totally not notice that the rug is about to be pulled out from under their feet, and I’m seeing that the powerful people and the organizations with power are not stepping up to support their people or their facilities or their industry. I think there’s going to be a huge amount of upheaval in the next while and it is going to be brutal and ugly and full of rhetoric about abuse and people twisting the welfare of animals to fulfill their agendas. At the end of it, if nobody does anything, you legitimately might never be able to go see big cat or an elephant or a komodo dragon again. I am scared for the immediate future of the zoos and aquariums. 

I know not everyone who follows this blog believes in the industry as much as I do. I know some of my followers are iffy about certain aspects of the field and that some of you aren’t sure you trust them at all. And that is entirely okay, and I thank you for bearing with me. I’m not trying to convert you to my way of thinking - I want to teach you enough to help you to develop your own. That’s what I’ve always done in regard to zoos on this blog, and that’s what I want to do with zoo politics. 

I’m hoping to ask you guys, my readers, to trust me that the politics surrounding captive animal management are worth paying attention to. I don’t think the zoos and their trade organizations are going to start doing that sort of education (if they ever do) until it is way too late to reverse the damage AR propaganda is going to do. I want to give you guys enough knowledge that when shit hits the fan you are able to look at everything from an informed perspective and decide what you want to support and why. 

I love the zoological field. The best thing I can do to give it a fighting chance is teach you guys everything and anything about it and send you off as informed, empowered people who give a shit about animals and want the best for them - whatever you decide you think that is.