worker wages

Hi, I’m a retail customer. I want top-quality products at rock-bottom prices. I want to shop the sales, but I don’t want to search for my size. I demand outstanding customer services with employees at my beck and call, but I don’t want to take off my headphones or interact with employees aside from ordering them to find particular products for me. Everything revolves around me! Employees are being paid to cater to ME. I’m going to make you search high and low for a $7.99 product even though you already told me we’re out of stock in my size. 

If you are not 100% devoted to me, personally, I will report you and give you bad customer feedback. Minimum wage workers deserve to be treated like garbage! If you don’t like it, just get a better job.

I don’t shop online, because of hackers. 

Things Retail workers HATE:

• “I wanna speak to your manager!”
• *tells you the price of every item as they’re taking it out of their cart*
• “Do you work here??”
• *Gives you half of their order saying they don’t want it anymore*
• *checks out 5 min after the store closes*
• “NO! I WANT EACH ITEM BAGGED SEPARATE!!”
• *hides things in random spots of the store*
• *watches- as their baby is sucking on an item, then puts it back afterwards*
• *Lets their kids ‘pretend’ shop- filling the cart with random things*
• *asks you to take off items, then changes their mind*
• *spends 10 minutes looking for a coupon as their checking out*
• *silences you* “I’m on the phone.”
• *Leaves their garbage behind items on the shelf*

4

The people who worked for Trump’s labor secretary pick are in the streets opposing him

  • In 24 cities on Monday, fast food workers took to the streets, hung banners from the tops of buildings and even shut down a corporate office in St. Louis. 
  • They had one simple goal: to stop Trump from making fast food CEO Andrew Puzder the top government official for protecting workers’ rights.
  • Puzder serves as the CEO of CKE Restaurants, the umbrella company that owns Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. burger chains.
  • Less than a month ago, cooks and cashiers filed 33 legal complaints against CKE. One complaint says that the company surveilled employees and sent out intimidating memos warning them not to speak to the press. 
  • One woman fought off advances from a manager who, after he was rejected, allegedly told her, “If you don’t start giving me what I want, I’m going to have to start taking it from you.” Read more (2/13/17 8:12 PM)

I propose anyone who claims a specific job doesn’t deserve a living wage doesn’t get to utilize those services anymore.

You think working fast food justifies struggling to survive?
You don’t get to eat fast food anymore.

You think cashiers and baggers don’t deserve to be able to provide for themselves and their families?
Looks like you’re using self-checkout from here on, even now that you’ll be buying a lot more groceries, since you’ll be cooking everything at home, since you can’t eat fast food anymore.

And you can count out eating at regular restaurants too, because those waiters and waitresses don’t even make the regular MINIMUM wage, and rely on tips to make up the difference, and are lucky if your cheap ass even tips the suggested amount.

Going into pretty much any clothing or beauty store and have an important question about something?
Tough shit. You’re now blocked off from communicating in any way with retail workers.
You can’t even get the things you need from the shelf - you have to dig through a special section of boxes that came straight from delivery, because the products don’t walk to the shelves themselves.

Minimum wage workers run a whole hell of a lot of the conveniences you probably count on.
If you, and others, so heavily rely on the people doing these jobs, why THE FUCK do you think they don’t deserve a living wage for doing them?

2

Trump just killed a groundbreaking new program designed to help low wage workers

  • Despite a series of crises dominating the attentions of the White House, Trump managed to find time to kill an innovative new program designed to help workers where they need it most — their retirement.
  • On Wednesday night, the White House announced Trump had signed House Joint Resolution 66, a measure that effectively kills the ability of states to create programs addressing the coming retirement crisis. Read more (5/18/17)
Gentle witch little things

Simple things you can do to bring more love and positivity into the world:

  • enchant the bus or train you’re on, so that everybody has a pleasant day or a safe travel home
  • paint protective sigils in the misty windows of buses or shops when it rains, and leave words of encouragement and praise on public bathrooms’ mirrors
  • bless passing ambulances and firefighter trucks with speed and safety for their patients/destination
  • wear an enchanted lipstick/gloss for your smile to brighten the day of everybody you meet
  • enchant your spare change so that it gives luck to the beggars you donate it to; they need it, don’t they?
  • actually, just enchant your money, so that retail and low-wage workers can have a better day when they serve you
  • leave blessed acorns and harmless trinkets in various places like buses or waiting rooms; give other people something to wonder about and make their day, and kids an item to roll in their hands mindlessly
  • bless food and leave it for stray animals; let birds be messangers of hope and miraclous event for everybody that sees them
  • whisper encouragement to trees and grass you pass by; let them know someone cares, someone sees their beauty, and awaits their bloom
  • smile at children and pets; provide them with the positive energy that the world is trying to kill in them
  • leave motivational notes, praise and silly drawings charged with love and hope on post-it notes as you go; they can brighten the day of those that find them
youtube

THE TRUTH ABOUT TRUMPONOMICS

When Donald Trump spoke at Boeing’s factory in North Charleston, South Carolina – unveiling Boeing’s new 787 “Dreamliner” – he congratulated Boeing for building the plane “right here in the great state of South Carolina.“

But that is pure fantasy.

Trump also used the occasion to tout his “America First” economics, stating “our goal as a nation must be to rely less on imports and more on products made here in the U.S.A.”

Trump seems utterly ignorant about global competition – and about what’s really holding back American workers.

Start with Boeing’s Dreamliner itself. It’s not “made in the U.S.A.” It is assembled in the USA. Most of the parts and almost a third of the cost of the entire plane come from overseas.

For example:

The center fuselage and horizontal stabilizers came from Italy.

The aircraft’s landing gears, doors, electrical power conversion system - from France.

The main cabin lighting came from Germany.

The cargo access doors from Sweden.

The lavatories, flight deck interiors, and galleys from Japan.

Many of the engines from the U.K.

The moveable trailing edge of the wings from Canada.

Notably, the foreign companies that made these parts don’t pay their workers low wages. In fact, when you add in the value of health and pension benefits, most of these foreign workers get a better deal than do Boeing’s workers.

These nations also provide most young people with excellent educations and technical training, as well as universally-available health care.

To pay for all this, these countries also impose higher tax rates on their corporations and wealthy individuals than does the United States. And their health, safety, environmental, and labor regulations are stricter.

Not incidentally, they have stronger unions.

So why is so much of Boeing’s Dreamliner coming from these high-wage, high-tax, high-cost places?

Because the parts made by workers in these countries are better, last longer, and are more reliable than parts made anywhere else.

There’s a critical lesson here.

The way to make the American workforce more competitive isn’t to build an economic wall around America.

It’s to invest more in the education and skills of Americans, in on-the-job training, in a healthcare system that reaches more of us. And to give workers a say in their companies through strong unions.

In other words, we get a first-class workforce by investing in the productive capacities of Americans  – and rewarding them with high wages.

Economic nationalism is no substitute for building the competitiveness of American workers.

I think baby boomers’ tendency to get very mad at slow service goes hand in hand with their dislike of smart phones. Every situation I’ve been in where service is slow? I just whip out my phone and browse apps for the extra 30 seconds. It’s not a big deal. Meanwhile Landline Howard behind me in line who’s never held a smartphone in his life is bored with nothing to occupy his time so he yells at minimum wage workers instead.

anonymous asked:

Why should we want to give people free college tuition and free this, and free that? That does nothing but make those who actually earn a college education less competitive in the job market because it'll become oversaturated with people who don't deserve degrees, having them. At the end of the day, there need to be people flipping burgers & tending to the garbage -- and no, they shouldn't make $15 an hour either.

Let me get this straight, we should not insure that we have an educated workforce because you are afraid of competition. Also, we need people to flip burgers and pick up garbage, but we should not pay them enough to live. 

There is one thing you are right about, minimum wage workers should not be making $15 an hour, they should be making more. We have made huge gains in productivity in this country on the backs of middle class and lower class workers. These gains in productivity means that a current minimum wage worker has to be doing more fiscally productive work throughout their shift than they had to 45+ years ago.

So why is it, that when adjusted for inflation, we are paying minimum wage workers less than their counterparts 45+ years ago made. They are doing more work and creating more in profits then their past counterparts, why do they deserve less? 

If the minimum wage had just kept pace with inflation since 1968 we would have a minimum wage of $10.90 right now.

If the minimum wage had kept place with productivity since 1968 we would have a minimum wage of $21.72

These facts lead me to some interesting questions you might want to consider. 

If the wealthy have been taking almost $14 per hour of work from each minimum wage worker, how much do you think they take from you?

If the minimum wage was $21.72 an hour, how much more do you think you would be compensated now if your boss knew you could go get a job flipping burgers for over $45,000 a year?

See when you argue that others people’s wages should be kept below a living wage, or below productivity increases all you are doing is arguing for a lower wage for yourself. 

Those minimum wage jobs act as competition for workers time. If they are paying enough to lure away good prospects from other jobs, the compensation for those other jobs must be raised if other companies want to retain the talent they have or to acquire new talent.  

As a consumer, options are good for you. The more options you have for work, the higher your wages are going to be. The more options you have in product choice, the lower you will pay for a good. 

These are simple economic truths. 

But if you want to still argue that all of our wages should be kept down because minimum wage workers don’t “deserve” $15 an hour, by all means, go ahead.

- @theliberaltony

6

New York City: Young workers protest wage theft by nonprofits, May 23, 2017.

A group of militant workers have organized a picket line outside of the Environment New York campaign’s office in midtown Manhattan. Led by a canvassing worker who had recently been fired, members of Workers World Party have joined in solidarity, citing ongoing concerns with wage violations.

Heather Morris, who canvassed for Environment New York for one week with the organization, states that the campaign failed to pay her and other staff for training hours. Environment New York claims that this was outlined in their staff’s policy; however, New York City labor law states that workers must be paid for training.

Morris was  terminated without reason last Thursday, May 18th, on a day where she was complaining to other workers about how they were not being compensated for training. After she brought up these concerns with the director of the campaign, she was offered a “settlement” pay of $89.42 for 8 and a half hours worked. This still falls short of New York City’s $11 per hour minimum wage.

In addition, the terms of the “settlement” had stated that she was not allowed to discuss the situation with anyone else further or file any claims. Morris had refused to accept the settlement, stating that she needs to keep fighting to ensure other workers are paid for their training as well.

Environment New York is one of the state affiliates of Environment America, a liberal non-profit environmental advocacy organization that raises its funds through canvassing. Canvassers are expected to stop people in the streets collecting donations and petition signatures. Environment America is run by the Fund for the Public Interest, the largest fundraiser for progressive causes in the United States.

In 2009, the Fund settled a $2.15 million class-action suit alleging it subjected workers to “grueling hours without overtime pay.” In addition, canvassing employees were found to have been paid below minimum wage. In 2005, The Fund had also been found to have denied rest breaks to a worker in California. In 2012, in Portland, Oregon, the Fund has also refused to reinstate a worker who was proven to have been fired as a result of his union activism.

Photos by @AshAgony on Twitter