worker wages

Things Retail workers HATE:

• “I wanna speak to your manager!”
• *tells you the price of every item as they’re taking it out of their cart*
• “Do you work here??”
• *Gives you half of their order saying they don’t want it anymore*
• *checks out 5 min after the store closes*
• “NO! I WANT EACH ITEM BAGGED SEPARATE!!”
• *hides things in random spots of the store*
• *watches- as their baby is sucking on an item, then puts it back afterwards*
• *Lets their kids ‘pretend’ shop- filling the cart with random things*
• *asks you to take off items, then changes their mind*
• *spends 10 minutes looking for a coupon as their checking out*
• *silences you* “I’m on the phone.”
• *Leaves their garbage behind items on the shelf*

I propose anyone who claims a specific job doesn’t deserve a living wage doesn’t get to utilize those services anymore.

You think working fast food justifies struggling to survive?
You don’t get to eat fast food anymore.

You think cashiers and baggers don’t deserve to be able to provide for themselves and their families?
Looks like you’re using self-checkout from here on, even now that you’ll be buying a lot more groceries, since you’ll be cooking everything at home, since you can’t eat fast food anymore.

And you can count out eating at regular restaurants too, because those waiters and waitresses don’t even make the regular MINIMUM wage, and rely on tips to make up the difference, and are lucky if your cheap ass even tips the suggested amount.

Going into pretty much any clothing or beauty store and have an important question about something?
Tough shit. You’re now blocked off from communicating in any way with retail workers.
You can’t even get the things you need from the shelf - you have to dig through a special section of boxes that came straight from delivery, because the products don’t walk to the shelves themselves.

Minimum wage workers run a whole hell of a lot of the conveniences you probably count on.
If you, and others, so heavily rely on the people doing these jobs, why THE FUCK do you think they don’t deserve a living wage for doing them?

the thing that bothers me about the McDonald’s sauce business, as someone who’s worked fast food before, is that corporate completely shat the bed and put the health and safety of their minimum wage workers on the line for the sake of some publicity for their company that is already a household name

let’s be real here, while the behavior of the fans of Rick and Morty is disgusting, the idea that these restaurant chains knew that the supply wouldn’t meet the demand that over a year of hype had caused and then made their employees, who typically aren’t making enough to live day to day, deal with it, without telling anyone, “hey, there’s only about twenty promotional sauces here, you’re going to deal with having to turn a lot of people away”

that wasn’t the advertising campaign, that wasn’t “hey we’re only going to have a very, very, very small limited amount of sauce available,” it wasn’t “hey, you have a chance of winning this sauce by purchasing our product and we’ll fucking mail it to you or something,” it was “hey, fuck it, we’ll make them give it away to about twenty people and then deal with thousands more”

how is that a good business practice? how is that nothing but cruel for your employees? how is that good pr, even? 

where’s the justification for this

Gentle witch little things

Simple things you can do to bring more love and positivity into the world:

  • enchant the bus or train you’re on, so that everybody has a pleasant day or a safe travel home
  • paint protective sigils in the misty windows of buses or shops when it rains, and leave words of encouragement and praise on public bathrooms’ mirrors
  • bless passing ambulances and firefighter trucks with speed and safety for their patients/destination
  • wear an enchanted lipstick/gloss for your smile to brighten the day of everybody you meet
  • enchant your spare change so that it gives luck to the beggars you donate it to; they need it, don’t they?
  • actually, just enchant your money, so that retail and low-wage workers can have a better day when they serve you
  • leave blessed acorns and harmless trinkets in various places like buses or waiting rooms; give other people something to wonder about and make their day, and kids an item to roll in their hands mindlessly
  • bless food and leave it for stray animals; let birds be messangers of hope and miraclous event for everybody that sees them
  • whisper encouragement to trees and grass you pass by; let them know someone cares, someone sees their beauty, and awaits their bloom
  • smile at children and pets; provide them with the positive energy that the world is trying to kill in them
  • leave motivational notes, praise and silly drawings charged with love and hope on post-it notes as you go; they can brighten the day of those that find them

Another thing that really bothers me about the conversations around ‘riots’ is the amount of people who have a binary image of ‘big capitalist store’ versus the romantized ‘honest local store’ and think they can tell the difference from a photo. 

A lot of local stores feel the need to compete with the big stores and treat their employees like shit. There are so many ‘local’ stores out there exploiting teenagers and undocumented people, paying them less than minimum wage, pushing them to work without breaks and to unpaid overtime. And local activists often know exactly who the worst bastards in town are. 

When I was young I worked at a cute little local bakery that exploited a hand full of underage workers, denying us basic workers rights and minimum wage and exposing us to constant emotional abuse. We worked long shifts on ovens placed much to close together without proper protective gear and we burned ourselves almost every day. We were given minimal time and no proper supplies to treat burns. I once burned myself very badly and dropped the bread I was holding and the boss made me sit through a ten minute shouting before I could treat my burn. I still have clear scars from that work after many years. 

So if the riot ever comes to that town, you can bet I’ll be right in front leading the charge to burn that cute little local bakery. 

by the way it should not take you working a shitty minimum wage job to finally realize minimum wage workers are also human beings that deserve consideration, just a fucking conscience

youtube

THE TRUTH ABOUT TRUMPONOMICS

When Donald Trump spoke at Boeing’s factory in North Charleston, South Carolina – unveiling Boeing’s new 787 “Dreamliner” – he congratulated Boeing for building the plane “right here in the great state of South Carolina.“

But that is pure fantasy.

Trump also used the occasion to tout his “America First” economics, stating “our goal as a nation must be to rely less on imports and more on products made here in the U.S.A.”

Trump seems utterly ignorant about global competition – and about what’s really holding back American workers.

Start with Boeing’s Dreamliner itself. It’s not “made in the U.S.A.” It is assembled in the USA. Most of the parts and almost a third of the cost of the entire plane come from overseas.

For example:

The center fuselage and horizontal stabilizers came from Italy.

The aircraft’s landing gears, doors, electrical power conversion system - from France.

The main cabin lighting came from Germany.

The cargo access doors from Sweden.

The lavatories, flight deck interiors, and galleys from Japan.

Many of the engines from the U.K.

The moveable trailing edge of the wings from Canada.

Notably, the foreign companies that made these parts don’t pay their workers low wages. In fact, when you add in the value of health and pension benefits, most of these foreign workers get a better deal than do Boeing’s workers.

These nations also provide most young people with excellent educations and technical training, as well as universally-available health care.

To pay for all this, these countries also impose higher tax rates on their corporations and wealthy individuals than does the United States. And their health, safety, environmental, and labor regulations are stricter.

Not incidentally, they have stronger unions.

So why is so much of Boeing’s Dreamliner coming from these high-wage, high-tax, high-cost places?

Because the parts made by workers in these countries are better, last longer, and are more reliable than parts made anywhere else.

There’s a critical lesson here.

The way to make the American workforce more competitive isn’t to build an economic wall around America.

It’s to invest more in the education and skills of Americans, in on-the-job training, in a healthcare system that reaches more of us. And to give workers a say in their companies through strong unions.

In other words, we get a first-class workforce by investing in the productive capacities of Americans  – and rewarding them with high wages.

Economic nationalism is no substitute for building the competitiveness of American workers.

The Democrats are honestly, objectively, the most idiotic party in this country if they exist as a party actually trying to gain seats and not as some complex money laundering or fraud scheme pulling in billions from like ten very wealthy Libs in NY & LA.

I mean, everything from their rush to the right by compromising on every single policy goal before even getting into office and announcing the policy to appease Republicans who will never actually vote for them over their own party in anything but totally inconsequential numbers, to actively trying to blunt the impact of actual Leftist movements by fiercely adopting rabid right-wing talking points on single payer healthcare feasibility to their suicidal insistence that nothing is actually wrong at all everything is fine.

I mean, this country has a lot of things that are fundamentally broken. The Right-wing parties have made tremendous gains because they’re vocalizing that fact, they’re saying that we’re in the midst of a generation-killing opioid epidemic, that while the economy has recovered for a handful of firms on Wall Street the average family is just as economically insecure as in 2008, our savings just as depleted, earnings even lower and jobs even less secure even if there are more of them and that something needs to give or something needs to change. They’ve taken to blaming foreigners & minorities for all societies ills, to catastrophic results.

The Left, largely, blames capitalism for the issues we’re facing, that attacking our problems via universal healthcare & universal basic income or at the very least a living minimum wage & stronger workers unions will fix a lot of the issues at hand.

 The Centrists & the soft-Right, the people that make up the Dems, though, they insist that nothing is wrong. Everything is fine. They run and lose on campaigns of ‘America Is Already Great’, empty rhetoric that hedges bets against itself even as they’re announcing it, promises that come with the caveat ‘this is the best we can offer, and we’re willing to settle for much worse’. They see a healthcare crisis and they’ll offer you a partial tax credit reimbursement on discounted Uber rides to the emergency room and say that preserving a system you can’t even afford a plan in is a tremendous victory for all of us, and that pushing for single payer universal healthcare is a ridiculous pipe dream and you’re a piece of shit purity-testing loon if you point out how much money they get from insurance companies every year to say that.

The Republicans are wrong. Deeply, fundamentally, they are wrong, and they are bad for this country but the Democrats are deeply, fundamentally stupid and they’ll let the Republicans get away with anything if the alternative is even the tiniest bit of socialism.

I think baby boomers’ tendency to get very mad at slow service goes hand in hand with their dislike of smart phones. Every situation I’ve been in where service is slow? I just whip out my phone and browse apps for the extra 30 seconds. It’s not a big deal. Meanwhile Landline Howard behind me in line who’s never held a smartphone in his life is bored with nothing to occupy his time so he yells at minimum wage workers instead.

The consolidation of surplus value of labor is funneled away from workers as wages are stagnant, and those profits are given to shareholders and CEOs. All this consolidation as reckless tax cuts are given to those same shareholders/CEOs

acaramela  asked:

Hey can I ask you something and this is a thoroughly ignorant question but I'm Latina and I grew up learning that Castro killed his own people and that he just was a terrible dictator. I even have friends from around the region that support this and say that Castro and communism are responsible for the suffering of the Cuban people. Could you explain to me why this isn't the case? I just can't find any other reliable sources to inform myself. Thank you.

im sorry this is long, but read the whole thing, its all important information

First, Cuba isn’t a one-man or military dictatorship. A lot of people don’t know this, especially in countries allied with America, but Cuba is highly democratic, and even takes measures to stop corruption in politics. For example, elected representatives are paid workers’ wages, so there is no monetary incentive to run for office, all voting is by secret ballot, votes are counted in public, voting is voluntary, elected representatives can be recalled at any time, women make up 48.9% of the Cuban government (a hell of a lot more than the US which can’t even break 20% in its Congress), it is illegal to spend any money on political campaigns to advertise for particular candidates, and candidates’ biographies and their reasons for standing are posted on public notice boards so everyone has equal exposure.

The nomination and election of local candidates for office is done in public meetings, with return meetings happening every 6 months. There are limitations in higher levels of the government, where voters must choose to either accept or reject a single nominee, but as far as i know, the principles of recall and community nomination still hold true.

You can read more about Cuban democracy here:

Why Cuba Still Matters // Representative Government in Socialist Cuba // Cuban Democracy Fact Sheet // How to Visit a Socialist Country // 

As for the specific claim that Castro is a dictator, its on very shaky grounds (to say the least). Its true, of course, that Fidel and Raul have been the only presidents of Cuba since the revolution. However, the presidency isn’t chosen like it is in America, directly (well, its not even direct in America, but thats another topic). The presidency is chosen through the elected parliament (national assembly).

Delegates to the National Assembly are elected every 5 years, half nominated from municipalities and half nominated by mass organizations (like trade unions, women’s orgs, cultural orgs, etc.). Each nominee must receive at least 50% of the vote. All in all, there are 612 delegates, and 48.9% are women. 

The National Assembly votes on who belongs to the Council of State, which appoints the ministers, Presidency, and Vice Presidency. And following a 2011 Congress of the Communist Party, senior elected officials can only serve two terms (10 years) in office. That means in 2018, Raul Castro will step down and a new President will be chosen.

We should also talk about what exactly “dictatorship” means. All societies are dictatorial for some and free for others, because all states are institutions of class rule. Cuba, while I don’t believe it has a socialist economy (and thus not a socialist government) has absolutely shown what can be done with the support of the mass power of the people, and drawn a line between it as a free and independent country and imperialists.

So how is Cuba in service of its people? It raised literacy from 60-70% to 96% in two years- today 100% of Cubans are literate. It has a massive amount of doctors per capita and has lower rates of infant mortality, HIV, and malnutrition than the US. They have state subsidized SRS and HRT, some of the best current LGBT rights in the Caribbean, despite their historical struggles with homophobia. They are the most sustainable country in the world, despite the embargo. 

(The Embargo is absolutely devastating to the Cuban economy, too. Never let a discussion of Cuba’s economy go on without discussing the impact of the embargo)

Still, compare those achievements to Haiti. A country that has been and still is politically and economically crippled by US and French imperialism, which suffers under a neocolonial elite, which is paid starvation wages to make Levis and other commodities for the US, which receives little to no aid when natural disasters hit (which are exacerbated by the ecological devastation of the island).

What is really responsible for the suffering of the people, not just in Cuba, but in Haiti and all countries in the global south? Is it really the ideology of socialism that fights for greater rights and the accessibility to basic needs? Or is it capitalist-imperialism, which strangles Cuba with economic blockades, and parasitically leeches off of its neighbors?

As for the claim that Castro killed “his own people”… the phrasing of this (and of course this isn’t your fault, anti-communists always phrase stuff like this) makes it seem like its better if politicians kill others in imperialist war. Killing “your own people” is somehow far worse than killing the people of countries you want to invade or control. Castro and Che did kill people, yes Cubans. But again, we have to look at the class forces involved. Who were those fleeing? Who were being killed? Historical records show most were rich, white Cuban plantation owners or otherwise of the middle and upper classes, who backed the former military dictator Batista:

All weekend a Cuban exile contingent of right-wing ‘gusanos’ have been gathered on Calle Ocho street in Miami’s “Little Havana” to celebrate the death of Fidel Castro. However the hatred was always mutual; as Fidel characterized the first 1960’s waves of wealthy white parasitic former land owners who were part of the Batista dictatorship he overthrew as “gusanos” (worms), based on their reactionary politics, intransigent support for the blockade, and desire to team up with the CIA to carry out terrorist attacks all across post-revolutionary Cuba. (Note, not all exiles fall into this category, especially more recent arrivals).

The zenith of gusano interference was the 1961 U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs invasion, which Cuba’s government defeated, and afterwards Fidel pointed out the wealth of many of the 1,100 exile soldiers that his troops captured (and later released back to the U.S. in exchange for baby formula). Within those 1,100 soldiers were: 100 plantation owners, 67 landlords of apartment buildings, 35 factory owners, 112 businessmen, 179 living off inheritances, and 194 ex-soldiers of Batista.

Over the decades since that time, the aging gusano contingent in South Florida has proven to be perhaps the most corrupt group (on a per-capita basis) in American politics—which is saying something. In their dying off ranks you can find Batista’s old BRAC secret police goons, ex Cuban mafia, CIA contract killers, and former oligarchs of vast latifundias. As essentially Miami is still controlled by the remnants of Batista’s dictatorship and their off-spring, a regime which killed 20,000 Cubans and tortured tens of thousands more.

(from here)

Almost all (and i only say almost because i don’t know of any who were not) of those executed were members of Batista’s army, informants, rich landowners who backed Batista, etc. And, contrary to the idea that these were executions against the people, they were actually popularly sanctioned:

Serving in the post as commander of La Cabaña, Guevara reviewed the appeals of those convicted during the revolutionary tribunal process.[9] The tribunals were conducted by 2–3 army officers, an assessor, and a respected local citizen.[105] On some occasions the penalty delivered by the tribunal was death by firing squad.[106] Raúl Gómez Treto, senior legal advisor to the Cuban Ministry of Justice, has argued that the death penalty was justified in order to prevent citizens themselves from taking justice into their own hands, as happened twenty years earlier in the anti-Machado rebellion.[107] Biographers note that in January 1959, the Cuban public was in a “lynching mood”,[108] and point to a survey at the time showing 93% public approval for the tribunal process.[9]Moreover, a January 22, 1959, Universal Newsreel broadcast in the United States and narrated by Ed Herlihy, featured Fidel Castro asking an estimated one million Cubans whether they approved of the executions, and was met with a roaring “¡Si!” (yes).[109] With thousands of Cubans estimated to have been killed at the hands of Batista’s collaborators,[110][111] and many of the war criminals sentenced to death accused of torture and physical atrocities,[9] the newly empowered government carried out executions, punctuated by cries from the crowds of “¡paredón!” ([to the] wall!),[100]

thats from wikipedia, no less

Always remember- all states are the power of one class over another. Whether that class is the working class by itself (or in alliance with a progressive and anti-imperialist bourgeoisie as in Cuba), or whether it is a reactionary or imperialist bourgeoisie armed against the working class of the world (as in the US)- states are not just democracies or dictatorships- but institutions of class power. Its interesting how we call Cuba a dictatorship when the rich landowners flee or face persecution or god-forbid *gasp* their land is redistributed to campesinos! But the United States, which has the largest (mostly black and brown) prison population in the world (both by number and per capita), which is established on stolen land, and which regularly exercises its power to interfere in and mess with other countries independence, is seen as “free.”

Here are some more resources on Cuba:

[Documentary] Cuba: Defending Socialism, Resisting Imperialism // 20 Reasons to Support Cuba // Cuba: A Revolution in Motion // Cuba and its Neighbors: Democracy in Motion // Work and Democracy in Socialist Cuba // The Sugarmill: The Socio Economic Complex of Sugar in Cuba 1760-1860 // Cuba and the US Empire: A Chronological History // A Hidden History of the Cuban Revolution // Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War // The World Economic and Social Crisis // The Economic War Against Cuba // Race in Cuba //