worker training

Please stop boycotting “A Dog’s Purpose”. That video of “animal abuse” was posted by TMZ. TMZ, who is just about tabloids and is known to be problematic. As a trainer, the person working with the dog was doing what he could. He stayed by her side, at her level, and spoke to her and reassuringly touched her sides.
This video was ALSO made by PETA, an organization that is notoriously awful. They have stolen animals from people’s homes and euthanized them several times. They also edited the video to skip right from footage of the dog being nervous about the water right to her being IN the water, implying they just threw her in. They didn’t. She’s a German shepherd, she isn’t a water dog and would naturally be nervous. The minute she showed any sign of struggle, they removed her and cared for her. This is a trained animal and trained workers who know how to make entertainment without hurting the doggy cast. Don’t boycott this film because of a literal tabloid.

washingtonpost.com
Analysis | President Trump won big in these places. Now he wants to eliminate 3 agencies dedicated to helping them.
By https://www.facebook.com/jeff.y.guo

From the article:

In rural Appalachia, people are so poor that there is a federal program dedicated to lifting them out of poverty. Through the Appalachian Regional Commission, the government pitches in on projects that these rural communities badly need but can’t quite afford — everything from fixing roads, to building computer labs, to training workers and to opening health clinics.

These efforts have become so widely admired that in recent years Congress launched, with bipartisan backing, sister agencies to help other rural regions stuck in generational cycles of poverty. Together the programs spend about $175 million each year bringing jobs and opportunities to places that long have felt left behind.

President Trump, who won rousing victories in these same parts of rural America, would eliminate that funding.

Read more.

anonymous asked:

Fuck customers at the fabric store who take bolts off the shelves and head straight to the cashiers with them. Like, first of all, 99.9% of all bolts in the store are BTY. Second of all, you HAVE to get them measured at the cut counter, no exceptions. No I cannot do it at the register with a shitty tape ruler you had in your back pocket. Thirdly, like 2/3 of our cashiers and cut counter workers are not trained to do double duty. Chance is the cashier doesnt even know how to manually ring fabric.

I have never related to something more. We got three people that did this a week at my old job and some of them did it regularly! -Abby

merry christmas, darling

A/N: Because we all need some happy Steggy for the holidays :)

Major thanks to @callingmrsbarnes for proofreading this! I dedicate this fic to @festivemattboyd, thank you English for collaborating with me on this farmer’s market au! :D 

word count: 1810


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my-imaginary-boyfriends  asked:

Hi Mark! I am a social worker in training and they teach us a lot about self care and avoiding burnout. What do you do for self care? Thank you!

We call it the “Right to be Human” in the activist world. Which means the right to be frail and vulnerable, and tired and even sick sometimes. Part of the system we are fighting against is one that takes repeatedly without replenishing. It’s extractive by nature and even violent in a way. If we really want to change the world then we must start within ourselves. We have to treat ourselves the same way we want other people to be treated, with care and respect and compassion. The simplest things go such a long way when it comes to self care. For me it’s allowing myself to actually stop and rest when I am sick so that the bug can be defeated instead of being suppressed into the system. Illness is kind of like feelings, if it is suppressed it internalizes and is never fully processed. Time with family and friends not doing anything but being with them and not feeling bad nor guilty for just being human. I meditate, I go for long walks, I lay in bed and read a book sometimes, I play with the kids, I sleep in some days. Take a little vacation sometimes, it’s so damn important.  For me it’s following your hearts content every once in awhile but it’s also allowing yourself to fall apart every now and again. 

Its quite stunning that Trump’s budget plans, Trumpcare, tax policies disproportionately fall on his supporters. Its quite a thing …

“In rural Appalachia, people are so poor that there is a federal program dedicated to lifting them out of poverty. Through the Appalachian Regional Commission, the government pitches in on projects that these rural communities badly need but can’t quite afford — everything from fixing roads, to building computer labs, to training workers, to opening health clinics.

   These efforts have become so widely admired that in recent years Congress launched, with bipartisan backing, sister agencies to help other rural regions stuck in generational cycles of poverty. Together the programs spend about $175 million each year bringing jobs and opportunities to places that long have felt left behind.

   President Trump, who won rousing victories in these same parts of rural America, would eliminate that funding.”

Also See: President Trump won big in these places. Now he wants to eliminate 3 agencies dedicated to helping them - Washington Post

i feel it in my skin, warming up my mind

Here is my preview for my fic for @runcharityzine a multifandom e-zine! All proceeds go towards Team For Kids. It features lots of amazing artists and goes on sale March 19th!

Oikawa Tooru is not a genius. 

 He’s strong, and determined; he’s skilled and dedicated, but he’s not a genius. He doesn’t possess a natural-born talent.

What he is, though, is an insanely hard worker.

He trains his body every day, pushing himself to the limits of what he can handle. He knows that if he stops for even a day, for even an hour, that he’s going to fall behind one of the young, gifted geniuses clawing at his back.

He refuses to let that happen.

The Aoba Johsai volleyball team practices after school every day, and once on weekends, with the approaching Interhigh tournament. The practices can be tough, but Oikawa likes that about them - and so does the rest of the team. There’s nobody there with any less desire to win, or any less desire to improve. As team captain, he doesn’t accept anything less than the best that the entire team can give.

It’s early in the morning on Saturday when Oikawa makes his way up the steps of their high school for practice. It’s not an official practice day, but the entire team likes to meet up when they can for extra practice. Their coach won’t be here, so it’s endurance training first, making use of the quiet routes around their school before the rest of the city wakes up.

“Slow down, Oikawa,” Iwaizumi gruffs from behind him.

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Photos by Jack Delano  

Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

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《火车上的中国人》是摄影师王福春先生的代表作,曾是一名铁道工人的他,用自己独特的视角跟踪记录了1978年到2014年30多年间中国车厢里的人生百态。以下这组照片是王福春先生摄于90年代的作品,每一节车厢就像一个小社会,浓缩了时代沉浮里一代普通中国人的欢乐与悲戚。

Chinese train passengers, taken in the 90s by train worker Wang Fuchun.
“each car was like a little society of its own.”
link

                                                                    No Excuses.

Young munition workers training at Paris’ Parc des Princes “in spite of the cold weather” as the headlines say.  The Excelcior Monday, February 12th 1917

Everyone has been noticing all of the Phineas and Ferb references scattered through Milo Murphy’s Law, including ones that hint that both take place in the same town (Danville) or very close to each other. I made a list that we’ve figured out from the first four episodes. I’ll italicize the things that are particularly speculative. I think I’m going to keep a Word Document to keep track of more hints/references/possibilities that come out later on:

Going the Extra Milo

- Milo points out the Maple Street Bridge. The Flynn-Fletcher home resides on Maple Drive/Street.

The Undergrounders

- The acronym DTA can be seen on train track workers’ vests, and it can be seen on the side of the train car used to escape from the underground. It could stand for “Danville Transit Authority.”

- Milo’s class visits the Museum of Natural History. While it doesn’t have the same appearance as the Museum of Natural History in Phineas and Ferb (like in the episode “It’s About Time!”), it’s still interesting that both shows have the same kind of building with the same title.

- Bradley notes he’s having his best day ever, a nod to the fact that Phineas and Bradley are both voiced by Vincent Martella.

Sunny Side Up

- The middle school is named Jefferson County Middle School. Jefferson County is the county that Danville resides in.

- A zoo is seen, particularly the polar bear exhibit. While not confirmed, it could be the Danville Zoo, which was seen in “Misperceived Monotreme”.

Rooting for the Enemy

- “Great Googly Moogly,” Monogram’s catchphrase, appears on an announcement board and is said by Melissa.

- A background kid celebrating Milo points out that the football game was like Football X-7, the version of soccer ball (football in the UK) Phineas and Ferb helped bring into reality in “My Fair Goalie” and gave to a soccer team afterwards.

A New App Will Help Flight Attendants Report Human Trafficking

Flight attendants are often the only people outside of government and law enforcement who interact with victims of human trafficking on a regular basis. The only problem is that they don’t always know who those victims are, even as handlers, buyers, or kidnappers are transporting them openly on commercial airlines.

Human trafficking can mean many things. Sometimes it’s men being forced into labor, while other times it’s women and children being sold into sexual exploitation. And because victims are often too bewildered and scared to self-identify, a coalition of groups is working to train flight attendants to look for signs.

Innocents at Risk, the Association of Flight Attendants, and Airline Ambassadors are three organizations that work in tandem with the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) anti-trafficking initiative. DHS helps train airline workers to recognize typical signs that a person is being trafficked—such as when an accompanying adult doesn’t know a child’s name or when a group of young women who don’t speak English appears to be in the thrall of a single person.

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In 2012, a train engineer in British Columbia was riding the rails when he caught sight of a man lying in the middle of the tracks. The engineer slammed on the brakes, but by the time the train managed to stop, 26 cars had gone over the man’s prone body, which had surely been juiced by the powerful locomotive. However, when the train workers dragged the presumed carcass from under the train, it (to quote the engineer) “got up, grabbed his beer, and was on his way,” like a drunken, whistling Sasquatch.

After the man was picked up by the authorities, they realized what had happened. Turns out that he had gotten into a booze-fueled argument with his girlfriend, gone for a walk, and decided to take a nap on the tracks (as one does). The alcohol had taken hold of this system so violently that he remained completely unconscious and utterly paralyzed as the train went whooshing over his head. If he’d awoken, moved slightly, or rolled over to scratch his butt, he would have been killed.

Instead, the worst thing he woke up facing was a bitching hangover, “mischief” charges, and the prospect of having to go through life not remembering his greatest drinking story.

5 Epic Bouts of Drunkenness That Made The History Books

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26-year-old Winnie Ruth Judd was working as a medical secretary in Phoenix, Arizona, in 1931. She had been married to Dr. William C. Judd for seven years; he was 22 years her senior and she was disappointed with married life. Dr. William C. Judd moved to Los Angeles to attempt to build a new doctors practice but Winnie stayed behind in Phoenix and moved in with two of her friends, Agnes Anne LeRoy and Hedvig Samuelson. On the night of 16 October, 1931, LeRoi and Samuelson were both shot dead by Judd after getting into an altercation about John J. Halloran, a well known married businessman, who all three women were apparently romantically interested in. After murdering the two women, Winnie dismembered Samuelson and stuffed her body parts into a trunk and stuffed LeRoi’s intact body into another trunk and took them both on a Los Angeles bound train. The foul odour emanating from the trunks aroused suspicion of a train worker who handed them to the police when the train arrived in Los Angeles. Winnie Ruth Judd became known as “The Blonde Butcher” and the brutal case became known as “The Trunk Murders.” During the murders, Winnie managed to sustain a gunshot wound to the hand and she attempted to use this as evidence of self-defence but the prosecution argued it was self-inflicted. Winnie was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to be hanged but was later on found to be mentally incompetent and sent to Arizona State Asylum for the Insane and paroled in 1971. She died at the age of 93 in 1998. 

Katy Perry Visits Children in Vietnam: 'We Have to Help Them Fight for Their Dreams'

HANOI/NEW YORK, 1 June 2016 – Following a visit to Viet Nam, internationally acclaimed singer-songwriter and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Katy Perry is calling for increased focus on children being left behind in one of Asia’s fastest growing economies.

Katy Perry was in rural Ninh Thuan province, among the poorest and most remote regions of Viet Nam. She visited UNICEF programmes aimed at ending exclusion for children with disabilities, and also saw the organization’s work in child survival, education and early childhood development; water, sanitation and hygiene; and climate change, in a particularly challenging environment.

“It was heartbreaking to meet a grandmother who was left to care for four grandchildren after her daughter passed away. The family lives off a bumpy path in a remote village in the hills, and one of the grandchildren, a five-year-old named Linh*, became severely malnourished. If a UNICEF-trained outreach worker had not come to the village, and made sure Linh got the care she needed, she might not be alive today,” said Katy Perry. “Linh is one of millions of children who face such challenges every day. That’s something we should all be worried about,” said Katy.

On top of poverty, which traps families in intergenerational cycles of deprivation, many of the country’s most vulnerable children and families now have to deal with the effects of climate change. A lack of access to clean water and sanitation, combined with long periods of drought, means children are even more prone to malnutrition and disease.

According to the World Bank income classification Viet Nam has now ‘graduated’ to become a lower-middle-income country. However, in rural areas such as the province Katy visited, children continue to suffer from deprivation and rampant and pervasive poverty stands in sharp contrast to the progress evident in big cities.

According to UNICEF, there has been a reduction in child poverty but this progress – while impressive – is only part of the story. Circumstances beyond a child’s control continue to deny some of them a fair chance to realize their potential. Continued support is required to reach the children left out but as the country advances economically, it is important that the focus on trade and business development does not displace investment in children’s well-being and development, particularly in hard to reach ethnic minority areas.

Katy’s visit aims to draw attention to critical issues impacting the millions of children who are not benefitting equally from prosperity, such as the majority of those living in Ninh Thuan. Many of them told her that they didn’t want to follow in the footsteps of their parents – they dream of being doctors and teachers and breaking the cycle of poverty their parents are living in.

“All the children I met have incredible dreams. We have to help them fight for those dreams. Investing in the most disadvantaged to give them a fair chance in life is not only the right thing to do, it is the best way to break the cycle of poverty and drastically improve children’s health, education and well-being,” said Katy.

In some regions, half of children live in absolute poverty and one in every five do not go to school. Around 50 per cent of children in these regions do not receive adequate health care, leading to high numbers of child deaths from preventable diseases every single day.

Children from ethnic minorities – which account for some 15 per cent of the total population in the country – continue to face exclusion and limited opportunities. Those who don’t speak Vietnamese as a first language find themselves behind at school and with very slim chances of achieving the levels of education which can lift them out of poverty. UNICEF and the government of Viet Nam are working together to break down the language barriers faced by children from ethnic minorities with the aim of giving them the opportunity to learn the primary school curricula in their mother-tongue language.

“On my first day in Ninh Thuan, I visited a school that provides children with disabilities the support they need to thrive alongside their peers. I also visited a junior high school mainly made up of students from ethnic minorities who were empowered by the opportunity to have access to higher education,” said Katy.

Across all its programmes in Viet Nam, UNICEF supports the government and other partners to pursue an equal agenda for all children in the country and especially for children from ethnic minorities and low income families, children with disabilities, and children at risk of exploitation and abuse.

“UNICEF works to ensure that every child, urban or rural, rich or poor, has a chance to thrive, to grow and to contribute to their families and communities as well as to have the opportunity to shape the world that we live in,” said Katy.

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On 26 May in Viet Nam:
Giving her scarf to Ka Da Khang while visiting the Phuoc Thanh Commune Health Centre in Ninh Thuan Province.
Attending a home visit with a health worker from the Phuoc Thanh Commune Health Centre in Ninh Thuan Province.
Katy Perry hugging Linh’s grandmother in Bac Ai district. “It was heartbreaking to meet a grandmother who was left to care for four grandchildren after her daughter passed away. The family lives off a bumpy path in a remote village in the hills, and one of the grandchildren, a five-year-old named Linh, became severely malnourished. If a UNICEF-trained outreach worker had not come to the village, and made sure Linh got the care she needed, she might not be alive today,” Katy Perry said. "Linh is one of millions of children who face such challenges every day. That’s something we should all be worried about,” said Katy Perry.