work press and publication

anonymous asked:

I don't have blinders. I see her attending things with Peter Morgan. I have no opinion on that because it's not connected to my private life and only connected to her and Peter Morgan. It's not to speak for Gillian when she has spoken about her need for privacy outside of work. We all read her press, we all know she wants the public out of her privacy, us fans are not allowed there. I agree with all you said of lying and being mean. It comes from entitlement and it's horrible. How I view it.

Oh anon! I didn’t mean you directly, I hope you know that. It was never my intention for you to feel defensive.  I agree that she’s a private person and we should definitely respect that. I’m just saying, if she’s tweeting about how The Crown will change your life, we should take it at face value. If she’s seen with Peter Morgan, maybe we shouldn’t be calling him terrible names. If she’s decided to share bits with us, maybe we should raise a glass instead of being a total ass about how this fits an imagined perspective of her and her life. Again, I’m not directing this at you anon. I’m just tired of the echo-chamber of self-delusion, the lying, the manipulation, the name-calling.

I personally enjoy no longer being in middle school. I’m sure you do too. 

larry clickbait

To those that argue that the only reason Larry is mentioned in the press is for clickbait, someone should have reminded the press before late 2014. Starting 2 weeks after the Larry bullshit tweet (October 1, 2012) up until October 2014 there were approximately 1,650 ‘Larry Stylinson’ news results. Comparatively, theres 1,640 ‘Larry Stylinson’ news results in the last 10 months. So maybe the press just suddenly caught on late last year about using Larry for clickbait or 1DHQ lifted restrictions and the Larry mentions are part of a bigger strategy.

2 years - 1,650 news results

Last 10 months - 1,640 results

One terrifying chart shows why YOU NEED TO VACCINATE YOUR KIDS 

Seventy people have become infected in a measles outbreak at California’s famed theme park, an outbreak that’s led California public health officials to urge those who haven’t been vaccinated against the disease to avoid Disney parks where the outbreak originated, the Associated Press reports.

While public health officials are working to ensure that the outbreak doesn’t spread, the AP notes (emphasis added), “people who have been infected range in age from 7 months to 70 years old … The vast majority were not vaccinated, and a quarter had to be hospitalized.”

nature.com
9 years of censorship. Canadian scientists can now speak about the government policy that restricted communications
Canadian scientists are now allowed to speak out about their work — and the government policy that had restricted communications.

Early one Thursday morning last November, Kristi Miller-Saunders was surprised to receive a visit from her manager. Miller-Saunders, a molecular geneticist at the Canadian fisheries agency, had her reasons to worry about attention from above. On numerous occasions over the previous four years, government officials had forbidden her from talking to the press or the public about her work on the genetics of salmon — part of a broad policy that muzzled government scientists in Canada for many years. At one point, a brawny ‘minder’ had actually accompanied her to a public hearing to make sure that she didn’t break the rules.

But the meeting last autumn was different. Miller-Saunders’ manager at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) in Nanaimo walked in with a smile and gave her advance notice that the newly elected government would be opening up scientific communication: she and other federal researchers would finally be free to speak to the press. “It was like a weight was being lifted,” she says. Important findings on climate change, depletion of the ozone layer, toxicology and wildlife conservation that had been restricted for so long could now be openly discussed.

Canadian scientists celebrated the move far and wide. Shark researcher Steve Campana danced in his office at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik, where he had relocated after leaving the DFO because of the communications constraints and other limitations.

Six months later, the government is loosening its grip on communications but the shift at some agencies has not been as swift and comprehensive as many had hoped. And with the newfound freedom to speak, the full impact of the former restrictions is finally becoming clear. Canadian scientists and government representatives are opening up about what it was like to work under the former policy and the kind of consequences it had. Some of the officials who imposed the rules are talking about how the restrictions affected the morale and careers of researchers. Their stories hint at how governments control communications in even more politically repressive countries such as China, and suggest what might happen in Canada if the political winds reverse.

“It was not a good time for journalists. It was not a good time for scientists. It was not a good time for morale in the federal community, and it was not a good time for Canadian citizens,” says Paul Dufour, a science-policy analyst at the University of Ottawa.

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Nine years of censorship

Early one Thursday morning last November, Kristi Miller-Saunders was surprised to receive a visit from her manager. Miller-Saunders, a molecular geneticist at the Canadian fisheries agency, had her reasons to worry about attention from above. On numerous occasions over the previous four years, government officials had forbidden her from talking to the press or the public about her work on the genetics of salmon — part of a broad policy that muzzled government scientists in Canada for many years. At one point, a brawny ‘minder’ had actually accompanied her to a public hearing to make sure that she didn’t break the rules.

But the meeting last autumn was different. Miller-Saunders’ manager at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) in Nanaimo walked in with a smile and gave her advance notice that the newly elected government would be opening up scientific communication: she and other federal researchers would finally be free to speak to the press. “It was like a weight was being lifted,” she says. Important findings on climate change, depletion of the ozone layer, toxicology and wildlife conservation that had been restricted for so long could now be openly discussed.

Canadian scientists celebrated the move far and wide.

The crackdown on government scientists in Canada began in 2006, after Stephen Harper of the Conservative Party was elected prime minister. During the nine-year Harper administration, the government placed a priority on boosting the economy, in part by stimulating development and increasing the extraction of resources, such as petroleum from the oil sands in Alberta. To speed projects along, the administration eased environmental regulations. And when journalists sought out government scientists to ask about the impacts of such changes, or anything to do with environmental or climate science, they ran into roadblocks.

For decades before the Harper administration, reporters had been free to call up government researchers directly for interviews. But suddenly, all requests for interviews had to be sent to government communications offices, which then had to get approval from multiple tiers of bureaucrats higher up. “It was an incredible rigmarole to try and get the most innocuous bit of information to media or the public,” says Diane Lake, who was a communications officer with the DFO at the time.

First Editions (A DenNor Oneshot)

For Mathias, the newness of the world is expressed through his poetry. Since adolescence, his writing has been unbounded, shaking off constraints of form. He scatters words like billiard balls; they are knocked out of order and shape by the force of the meaning that propels them. The lines ebb and flow like the movement of thoughts. Momentous events are accorded a handful of words; the crack in the neck of a vase takes a hundred. He extemporises. He turns every phrase over in his mind like a lump of clay until it is warm with life and truth.

Mr L. Kristiansen, poetry editor at Hanover Square Press, regrets to inform him that his work is not suitable for publication.

London, 1925. The war is over, and the city belongs to the Bright Young Things - rich young pleasure-seekers at the forefront of an artistic revolution. Mathias, a young Modernist poet, finds himself in conflict with Lukas, an editor who fails to see his genius. However, as their correspondence develops, the two will discover just how closely they are linked, and just how precious the relationship is to them both.

(Early bday gift for my eternally fabulous Tumblr friend holytoniempire!) :3

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Why, hello there, Thales Lira! Welcome to Sunday Morning Comics!

Thales’ work is a nice mix of aesthetically pleasing colors and format, and broken narrative. The characters appear deep in back story and purpose and discerning that history and future is part of the fun. 

Thales joins the project all the way from Brazil!

Pictured above are four panels from @Hunt. You can see the whole strip when you pre-order Issue 1!

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