wool cardigan

  • Scout Aesthetics: Fresh laundry. Hot dogs for dinner. Cold pizza for breakfast. A really good haircut. A joke so funny that you cry. New shoes. The CRACK! of a baseball on a wooden bat. FOMO. Peppermint chewing gum. Runner's high. Your first crush.
  • Soldier Aesthetics: Pine trees. Cold dew on a summer morning. MRE's that don't taste like paper pulp. Cornfields as far as the eye can see. Screaming at the sky late at night. Turkey with stuffing. White bread in a plastic sleeve. Getting gum on your shoes.
  • Pyro Aesthetics: Scented candles and burnt popcorn. Fresh-cut daisies. Drawing with charcoal. Sun bleached bones. The smell of gasoline. Gel pens. Your favorite animated movie. The scapegoat. Not caring at all.
  • Demoman Aesthetics: Butterscotch and sulfur. Rolling meadows of grass. Sand in your shoes. Fried fish in a greasy newspaper. Fireworks on a warm summer evening. Wool turtleneck sweaters. Being double-dog-dared to swim in the lake during winter. The best hole-in-the-wall pub in the world.
  • Heavy Aesthetics: Dusty old books. Creaking floorboards. Fresh winter snow. A really good sandwich. Finding a new favorite novel. A handmade scarf. Getting a good grade on an assignment. First editions. Going to the natural history museum. Firmly believing why you were put on this earth.
  • Engineer Aesthetics: Breakfast foods. Campfires. The satisfying clicking of clockwork machinery. Reading bedtime stories aloud. T-shirts with math jokes on them. Tuning a guitar. Petting zoos. Knowing your limits. Learning about something that makes you really happy. A cool looking rock.
  • Medic Aesthetics: Antiseptic. Down comforters. Really round fluffy birds. Bad puns. Doing things because you can. Hot tea. Waking up before the sun does. Whistling. Dry cleaning. Fun facts about animals. Really strange nonfiction books. Windy winter days.
  • Sniper Aesthetics: Dirt and black coffee. Climbing a tree. People watching. Road trips. Going to bed and realizing you haven't spoken to anyone all day. Fairy bread. Getting caught in the rain. Really cool scars. Having a story for everything. Polarized lenses.
  • Spy Aesthetic: Vermouth and tobacco. Minimalist cuff links. Playing cards. Hair pomade. Silk ties. Your first love. A passing feeling of emptiness. Heels clicking on polished floors. Crusty dinner rolls with soft warm bread on the inside.
  • Pauling Aesthetics: Lavender hand soap. Gunpowder. Lilac polo shirts. Worn black denim. Staying up late and watching the home shopping channel because you can't sleep. Beat-up firearms catalogs. Telling your mother to return your birthday gift because your workplace has strict dress codes regarding clothing colors, even though you desperately need that new skirt. Finding drawings from when you were a child. Soft wool cardigans. Shiny silver knives. Yogurt with fruit. Hating and loving your job at the same time.

Natalie Westling & Vittoria Ceretti by  Collier Schorr - Jean Paul Gaultier Haute Couture Fall 2016

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etsyfindoftheday 3 | 4.17.17

knitted cardigans for men and women by vajuhandmade

i’ve been finding a lot of rad ukranian etsy shops lately, like vajuhandmade — a cool sweater and accessories seller that has styles for both men and women. check ‘em all out and find your faves!

mrsives  asked:

hi pauline, I was just wondering if you have any places in edinburgh you find particularly interesting/enjoyable/that you'd recommend to someone visiting there? I'll be there for 4 days with a friend, and we're trying to make the most of our visit. (also I hope you're enjoying the ma and living there, and apologies if this has already been asked!)

Hey love, sorry for my late reply! 

First things first, I have to say that I’m still pretty much a tourist in the city, and that I keep to the old part of town anyway, which might make things a bit boring for you. But here are the things I like doing best here:

Walk the Royal Mile up and down over and over again. It’s terribly cliché, but it’s such a lovely street, cobble-stoned, full of overpriced, archetypal scottish products, but resonating with the song of bagpipes, buoyant with street artists, surrounded by old, tilting houses, peppered with fairy lights; at the top, you enter a strange, time-travelesque, gothic slope that will bring you up to the castle, which is absolutely a must see. You can stay within the castle walls for hours on end—magnificent view, multiple museums and chapels, stony benches, a strange step in the Middle-Ages.

Tour the university campus—there, you’ll find Walter Scott’s house, the beautiful Old College buildings, the modern Library and its art collections. In the Student’s Union House, you’ll be able to take a drink and walk through rooms upon rooms of comfortable armchairs, hushed whispers and loud laughters, impressive ballrooms and tiny writing offices. Down the Middle Meadow Walk, you’ll find a large, green park too. 

Really, it’s a strangely scaled city: it feels like an out-of-time town, small and twisty and labyrinthine, yet it’s the capital, full of historic sites and cultural spots. 

St. Giles Cathedral is exquisite, and solemn, and full of hushed light; of course the National Gallery is lovely if you’re interested in British art, but my favourite is the National Museum, which is a wonderful bric-à-brac of knowledge and playful activities and delightful treasures. There you’ll find fashion designs as well as medieval war weapons, dinosaur skeletons and Art Deco tapestries, the Lewis Chessmen, and even space stones. The National Library is worth a short visit, with its whacky museum and a bunch of beautiful maps and books. Grab a coffee in the charity coffee-shop of the Storytelling Centre, enjoy the view of its lush, secret garden, and its folktales bookstore. Near it, you’ll find my favourite jewellery shop, full of Scottish stones, Highland Gems. I also love to walk in the Greyfriars and the St. Cuthbert cemeteries, which are gothic and yet full of whimsical life stories, ornate benches, strange, twisted trees; and of course, try and go climb Arthur’s Seat—the climb is painful and the view is spectacular, and it’s so strange to see this ragged, wonderful, green, ocre, beautiful hill in the corner of your eye, wherever you are, alien in the center of the city. 

The light, here, anyway… The light on Arthur’s Seat, on Calton Hill (another nice climb!), on the Castle; rich and golden and extraordinary.

In Grassmarket, you’ll find Armstrong Vintage store, which I recommend wholeheartedly, especially if you want a Scottish wool cardigan for an affordable price, or even just to take a look at the ancient ecclesiastical and victorian garments hanging from the ceiling. There’s also this wonderful shop with a lot of dinosaur’s bones, fossils and star stones, Mr. Wood’s Fossils. From there and up to Westport, you’ll find Mary’s Milk Bar (great ice-cream), cute antique shops, bookstores, and the Art Library.

Now for my favourite bookstores, I’d recommend you go to Armchair Books (the absolute best, a twisting labyrinth of new and second-hand books, with a great antique section); Southside Books; Waterstones on Prince’s Street, where you’ll find beautiful modern editions and will be able to get some great coffee/tea and nice gluten free (or not) cakes; the OldTown bookshop, where victorian copies neighbour old maps and antique drawings of the old Edinburgh, and which is incidentally located on the lovely Victoria Street; and of course Blackwells, which features a very cool Harry Potter window. 

Now for the real Tourist Experience, I do recommend you take one or two of Edinburgh’s walking tours, because they’re wonderful. One of them would be the writer’s museum book-lover tour, which starts at the museum (very small, but super nice, with a lot of Scottish’s writers memorabilia) and takes you around Old Town—to the university where Conan Doyle studied, the hospital where J. M. Barrie invented Wendy, wrecking the myth of J. K. R’s Elephant House (Harry Potter was NOT written there!), etc. The other tours I’d recommend are the ghost tours (usually guides dress up and play morbid jokes on your group, and it’s a very fun way of learning about the actual old Edinburgh) and the underground tours (the underground city being full of morbid legends, spooky closes, twists and turns). 

Here you go, it’s mostly stuff you can find online, I’m afraid, but I hope you have fun!

vernon; drunk on youth (m)

Originally posted by sneezes

genre: fluff/romance and a lil bit of the steamy steam ;)

word count: 8495

characters: Hansol Vernon Chwe/Original Female, bff!Jeonghan + various

prompts: seven(teen) minutes in heaven, university!AU with fraternity!Seventeen, one night stand(?), friends-to-lovers 

*this references to traditional American University Greek life, referring to members as “brothers”, if you’re confused please message me! feelin hella clever that SVT/ ΣΛΤ was managed to be made in the greek alphabet

a happy birthday gift to my sol @vernkn

Hansol Vernon Chwe, she tried to unsuccessfully convince herself, meant nothing to her.

Not when he walked into 18th Century Children’s Literature every Monday and Wednesday, looking like the dead bird her pet cat dragged in when she was three. His ebony strands would stick out like dead twigs, usually muffled by a worn navy baseball cap with the lid twirled behind his neck. He never made a fuss when he entered a minute before the class would start, rushing to the nearest empty desk with his head down, lost in thought. Even though it was an afternoon class, he still managed to look like he walked right out of bed and into lecture.

He meant nothing to her, when he seldom spoke in their seminar, tucked away in the back scribbling notes. Especially not when he’d pipe up for class participation every other blue moon, speaking with sudden austerity about how the English language is so convoluted, his voice strangely comparable to the thickness of raw honey.

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