womens history month

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Yaasssss!

Originally posted by empirefoxtv

also: happy women’s history month to every trans woman
you’re constantly erased from history and pushed out of women’s spaces but you belong there and you have always been important parts of history.
let’s not forget trans women this year.

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Our last women’s history month post this month is also in honor of Transgender Day of Visibility on the voice actress Maddie Blaustein. Maddie was a major voice actor and creator in various industries, and if you grew up with anime, you’ve probably heard her voice at one time or another. Maddie was a transgender woman who worked for several companies.

Maddie was born in October 1960 in Long Island, New York. She was the second-oldest of five siblings, and was Jewish. She was born intersex and began transitioning later on in her life. She was a fairly well-known activist for transgender rights within the community. She has been credited with other names in work, including Madeline Blaustein and Kendra Bancroft

Maddie was perhaps most well known for her work as a voiceover actress, primarily in anime. She worked for family dubbing company 4kids, which was a New York-based company that dubbed anime for saturday morning cartoons. Perhaps her most famous role was that of the talking pokemon Meowth in the famous franchise, a role she carried for several seasons. She also portrayed Pokemon characters Lt. Surge and Bill, along with many minor characters. Other famous roles that she took on include that of Solomon Mutou (Yugi’s grandfather) in the anime Yu-Gi-Oh! and  Chef Kawasaki in the english dub of the anime Kirby: Right Back at Ya!

She voiced a large number of characters in her lifetime, one of her most recent roles being that of Satorious in Yugioh GX. She was arguably one of 4kids’ more famous voice actors, having at least one role in almost all of their properties. Some of the other 4Kids dubs she had a role in include Ultimate Muscle, One Piece, and Cubix. She acted in other things as well, including the characters Li Zhuzhen and Colonel Hyuga in the game Shadow Hearts. She also portrayed characters in Samurai Deeper Kyo and Slayers Try.In the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, she played the robot Omega in several games as well as the president in Shadow the Hedgehog

Maddie did often work outside of animation. She wrote and did art for several comics, including Static, Power Pachyderms, and Hardware. She was an active content developer for the game Second Life under the name Kendra Bancroft, and gained a good reputation for her skills as a 3D modeler. She was also the creative director for the Weekly World News for a time. Her brother Jeremy Blaustein is a translator and video game localizer. 

Maddie passed away in late 2008 from an untreated stomach virus. Memorials poured in from fans who grew up with her work all over the internet.

Her work in anime, comics, and voice acting is not forgotten and lives on with the people who grew up listening to her work. Her impact on the anime industry in the west has been felt by many, and her dedication to excellence as an artist and a person is not forgotten. 

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Originally posted by horsesaround

Originally posted by yang-smash-trash


We’re celebrating Women’s History Month with behind-the-scenes art of some of our most iconic and powerful women characters - beginning with The Legend of Korra! “I am certainly proud to add Korra to the pantheon of TV characters, which is perpetually sorely lacking in multifaceted female characters who aren’t sidekicks, subordinates or mere trophies for male characters.“ -Bryan Konietzko, co-creator.

Listen to Bryan and co-creator Michael Dante DiMartino on the Nick Animation Podcast! 

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Last year I did a few write-ups and drawings about some lady fighters from history who fought openly as their gender (there are plenty of disguised-as-a-man soldiers and plenty of trans soldiers, but those are outside the scope of this series).  This is by no means an exhaustive list; there were plenty of great figures that my schedule didn’t permit me to tackle (at least not yet).  But as Women’s History Month gets started tomorrow, I thought y’all might enjoy reading about some of history’s toughest broads.

instagram

Ayyyyeee!

Lupita Nyong'o (Nakia) & Letitia Wright (Shuri)

#WakandaForever

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Happy Blackout Day! My name is Sophia and I’m a scifi writer! I have two books on amazon. One is a scifi mystery about a black girl named Cosmo. My second book is a short romance story about black love in space!

Also sometimes I tweet things.

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Women’s Art History Masterpost

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, feminist art scholar and research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, Anja Foerschner, selected key publications and journals for those want to explore art by women and feminist art.

The Feminist Art Journal (produced from 1972 to 1977).

The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community by Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James (1975).

Woman Artists 1550–1950 by Ann S. Harris (1977).

Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture. (Produced from 1977 to 1980).
Free Download

Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology by Arlene Raven, Cassandra Langer, and Joanna Ellen Frueh (1988).

Women, Art, and Power: And other Essays by Linda Nochlin (1988).

Women, Art, and Society by Whitney Chadwick (1990).

Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by Bell Hooks (1995).

Woven by the Grandmothers: Nineteenth-Century Navajo Textiles from the National Museum of the American Indian by Eulalie H. Bonar (1996).

Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party in Feminist Art History by Amelia Jones and Laura Cottingham (1996).

Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist by Judy Chicago (1997).

Angry Women by Andrea Juno and V. Vale (1999).

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History by Harmony Hammond (2000).

Black Feminist Cultural Criticism by Jacqueline Bobo (2001).

The Black Female Body: A Photographic History by Deborah Willis and Carla Williams (2002).

Art/Women/California, 1950–2000: Parallels and Intersections by Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni (2002).

Dark Designs and Visual Culture by Michele Wallace (2004).

Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York by Midori Yoshimoto (2005).

WACK!: Art and the Feminist Revolution by Cornelia Butler and Lisa Gabrielle Mark (2007).

The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America by Charmaine A. Nelson (2007).

Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities by Laura E. Pérez (2007).

Ana Mendieta by María Ruido (2008).

Visual and Other Pleasures by L. Mulvey (2009).

Modern Women: Women artists at the Museum of Modern Art by Cornelia H. Butler and Alexandra Schwartz (2010).

EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art by Kellie Jones (2011).

Women Building History: Public Art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Wanda M. Corn, Charlene G. Garfinkle, and Annelise K. Madsen (2011).

After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art by Eleanor Heartney, Helaine Posner, Nancy Princenthal, Sue Scott, Linda Nochlin (2013).

Visualizing Guadalupe: From Black Madonna to Queen of the Americas by Jeanette Favrot Peterson (2014).

Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin (2016).


We want this list to grow, so please reblog with your favorite resources on art by women and feminist art.

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“They were going to the moon. I computed the path that would get you there. You determined where you were on Earth when you started out, and where the moon would be at a given time. We told them how fast they would be going, and the moon will be there by the time you got there.”—Katherine Johnson

We’re highlighting a couple of important TechMAKERS this week for Women’s History Month. These women have made incredible strides in STEM, despite the challenges they faced entering professional and academic fields that are overwhelmingly male-dominated.

It was only recently, with the release of Hidden Figures, that Katherine Johnson received the public recognition she deserved. There was not much visibility granted to a woman of color working at NASA in the 1960s.

Katherine made innumerable contributions to our space program, but the most important was being part of the team that put an American on the moon. She calculated the trajectory analysis for the mission because the computer they used was known to be faulty. We repeat: Katherine Johnson’s calculations were more trusted than that of NASA’s computers. 

To see our full video profile of Katherine Johnson, head on over to MAKERS

They thought we were playing 😂

A post shared by The Shade Room (@theshaderoom) on Feb 16, 2018 at 5:57am PST

Bonus 😏:
👑#BlackPantherSoLit🔥#WakandaForever✊🏽
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White women need to deal with the fact that most of you voted for Trump. It’s the not the job of black women or any marginalised and oppressed person to take responsibility for the actions of their oppressor or to educate their oppressor.

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“My LGBQTIA family, I see each and every one of you. The things that make us different, those are our superpowers. Every day when you walk out the door, put on your imaginary cape. and go out there and conquer the world, because the world would not be as beautiful as it is if we weren’t in it.”

For the first full week of Women’s History Month, we’ll be celebrating women have broken down barriers. We call them HistoryMAKERS. 

Lena Waithe made history at last year’s 69th Emmy Awards, becoming the first Black woman to not only be nominated, but also the first to win the award for writing for a comedy series. Her acceptance speech touched on the power of representation, and the importance of being recognized as valid. 

You can watch our interview with Lena right over on MAKERS.