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hollywoodreporter.com
DC Launching Female-Focused 'Gotham City Garage' Comic in August
DC Entertainment is taking the resistance on the road with new series Gotham City Garage, based on the popular line of statues from DC Collectibles.


Set in an alternate version of the DC Universe where Governor Lex Luthor has transformed the traditional dystopia of Gotham City into a contemporary paradise known as The Garden, Gotham City Garage centers on those who don’t believe in his program of keeping all citizens locked up to one networked mindset that he controls. And these members of the resistance just happen to be versions of familiar DC heroines.

“Gotham City Garage is an anti-fascist anthem for the open road, starring reimagined takes on DC’s great female characters through an outlaw lens,” Collin Kelly, who’ll co-write the series with Jackson Lanzing, said in a statement. “We’re bringing Big Barda, Steel, Catwoman, Harley Quinn, Silver Banshee, Hawkgirl and the first Kryptonian this world has ever seen — the mysterious girl named Kara Gordon — into a world of bikes, outlaws and elaborate tattoos.”

lonely women can be
large and messy in beds that do not miss
the ones who left, women who relish space,
who hold it against their chests, who
remember

themselves as something other
than someone else’s miracle,
women who see God
in her fingers,
the middle one
raised to the sky

—  Tatiana M.R. Johnson, from “holy women,” for the love of black girls: poems

“I just decided when someone says you can’t do something, do more of it.” - Faith Ringgold

Faith Ringgold’s Freedom Woman Now (Political Posters) from 1971. In honor of International Women’s Day. See more of Ringgold’s works at mo.ma/faithringgold

(Cut-and-pasted colored paper on board. The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Endowment for Prints. © 2017 Faith Ringgold/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

First You Came for the Trans Women: An Open Letter to the Chicago Dyke March Collective

Core Members of the Chicago Dyke March Collective (CDMC),

I am a Jew. I am also the first trans woman to have been a member of your collective. I am writing in regards to your collective’s decision to ask three women carrying Jewish pride flags to leave the 2017 Chicago Dyke March.

My interest in questions regarding inclusion at the Chicago Dyke March goes at least as far back as 2009, the year when I became a core member of your collective. Almost immediately I became concerned when another core member violated a trans woman’s privacy in such a way that, had it happened to me, I would have considered it a violation of my sexual boundaries. In the backlash that ensued after I voiced my complaint other core members put their feelings before trans women’s need for safety and scapegoated me. It was only after the aforementioned core member of your collective violated my sexual boundaries, demonstrating even to the most loyal member of your collective that my concerns were justified, that the verbal abuse subsided. But still no justice. It was nearly two years before representatives of your collective met with me to talk about what had happened. Your collective made four promises to me and to Chicago’s queer and trans community. It immediately kept the only promise that required it to do nothing substantial—the promise to publicly apologize. To this day it has not kept its other three promises. But it has found new ways to hurt me, including publishing personal correspondence that had the potential to out me. The last time I asked CDMC about its cascading failure, it gave me no collective answer, but in 2012 one of its members responded in a way that now seems like eerie foreshadowing: She said that your collective owed me nothing because I had already gotten my “pound of flesh”, thus drawing a connection between me and an antisemitic caricature.

I am hardly the only one who wants answers from your collective. Many people are now asking, “Was the Chicago Dyke March Collective’s decision to ask three Jewish women to leave the march antisemitic?” It is a fair question. The political right likes to use divide-and-conquer schemes to keep us from uniting to confront oppression. As April Rosenblum argued in The Past Didn’t Go Anywhere, one of the most successful instances of this scheme has been the scapegoating of Jewish people to keep us from focusing on our real oppressors. Blaming diasporic Jewish people for the actions of the State of Israel is the latest variation on a theme at least as old as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Of course not all fair questions have “yes” as an answer. To find out if your collective’s actions play into systemic bias against Jewish people we need to look at the facts. I was not at the march, so I will charitably assume the account your collective gave in its statement is true. You wrote, “We have since learned that at least one of these individuals is a regional director for A Wider Bridge” (emphasis mine). Does it need to be said that what you learned about one of the Jewish women after you asked her to leave the march could not have been the reason you asked the women to leave the march? You also wrote that the women were “carrying Israeli flags superimposed on rainbow flags”. If the flags you were referring to were like the one seen in a photograph published to the web site of the Windy City Times on Saturday, there was nothing superimposed on them besides Stars of David, making them no different from the Jewish pride flags I first saw at Dyke March in 2005 (five years before A Wider Bridge was founded). The Star of David is a symbol of Judaism and my people, the Jewish people, and there is nothing inherently Zionist about it. It is evident to me that your collective has put some people’s feelings before Jewish queer women’s need for queer community.

I find no comfort in your assurance that “anti-Zionist Jewish volunteers and supporters are welcome at Dyke March and were involved in conversations with the individuals who were asked to leave”. For one thing, Jewish people, including those of us who express our pride through the use of Jewish symbolism, should not have to be extensively educated on all political viewpoints before we can participate in an event that is purportedly for all “dyke, queer, and trans” people. For another, all too often Jewish people are subjected to a political litmus test that non-Jewish people are not. (Nobody asked me what my views on Palestine were before they found out I had Jewish ancestry. Such selective outspokenness on Palestine does a disservice to both Jews and Palestinians.) Finally, it reminds me of the reassurances I heard after your collective violated me—that there were trans people who nevertheless stood among you. The goal of solidarity is not to collect oppressed people to insulate yourself from criticism even while you crush us. Rather, the goal of solidarity is to stand with all who are being crushed throughout our struggles even while we resist internalized oppression. In 2010 your collective’s insistence that I was “welcome” to participate in a march with people who had hurt me did not stop your collective from violating me again. And in 2017 your collective’s insistence that the Jewish people you approve of are “welcome” to participate in a march where my people have been harassed does not make your collective any less antisemitic.

L’shalom,
Veronika Boundless

Louise Catherine Breslau (1856-1927)
“La Toilette” (1898)
Oil on canvas
Currently in a private collection

Breslau would become the third woman artist, and the first foreign woman artist to be bestowed France’s Legion of Honor award. Breslau would go on to become a well-regarded colleague to some of the day’s most popular artists and writers including Edgar Degas and Anatole France. One person who was very special in Breslau’s life was Madeleine Zillhardt, with whom she spent over forty years. Zillhardt, a fellow student at the Académie Julian, became Breslau’s muse, model, confidant, and supporter.

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Marisa Berenson wearing a Taroni silk shirt by Capucci with Bulgari rings and necklaces; Styled and make-up by Pablo of Elizabeth Arden. Photos by Gian Paolo Barbieri. Vogue 1969