women's-right

Prominent 19th century suffragist and civil rights activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) became involved in the abolitionist movement after a progressive upbringing. She helped organize the world’s first women’s rights convention in 1848, and formed the National Women’s Loyal League with Susan B. Anthony in 1863. Seven years later, they established the National Woman Suffrage Association. With her advocacy of liberal divorce laws and reproductive self-determination, Cady Stanton became an increasingly marginalized voice among women reformers late in life. However, her efforts helped bring about the eventual passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave all citizens the right to vote. 

Women in Westeros and misogyny- part 1 - Cersei

With many fans hyping over the next season and accusations about almost everywhere in the fandom, that disliking a woman on the show makes you a misogynist or anti-feminism, I think it is well worth discussing if women in Westeros are feminists and what exactly would it mean to dislike someone because of misogyny. I’ll start by talking about the terms I use.

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You don’t have to love abortion. You can dislike it. Maybe it even makes you sad. The way you view abortion is up to you. If you don’t like abortion, you can advocate for proper sex education, access to birth control and other things that have been shown to lower unplanned pregnancies. You don’t have to like abortion.

But what you can’t do is disrespect somebody for having an abortion. You can’t take away that choice from women because you don’t like it. Your emotions are not somebody else’s responsibility. Your emotions aren’t more important than anyone else’s bodily autonomy. You don’t have to like abortion, but you have to respect other people’s rights and that includes the right to safe, accessible, abortion.

What the House Vote to Repeal Obamacare Means for Planned Parenthood

Congress Is a Step Closer to Repealing the Affordable Care Act and ‘Defunding’ Planned Parenthood. Here’s What the Bill Actually Does, and How to Fight Back.

On May 4, the U.S. House voted to pass the worst bill for women’s health in a generation: the American Health Care Act (AHCA). This bill not only seeks to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but also to “defund” Planned Parenthood by blocking Medicaid patients from care at its health centers. 

As the bill heads to the Senate, here’s what it actually does — and what it doesn’t do.

What Thursday’s Vote Did NOT Do

  • It didn’t become law.
    The ACA repeal bill passed the House by a narrow margin, and now it faces an uphill battle in the Senate. We can expect more changes to the bill that will impact women’s health.
  • It didn’t close Planned Parenthood.
    All Planned Parenthood health centers are open as usual, and staff are doing what they’ve always done: getting up in the morning; opening the health center doors; and providing high-quality, affordable health care to all people who need it. That includes patients who rely on Medicaid coverage.
  • It didn’t cancel your insurance.
    The benefits of the ACA are still here for you, even if you’re 26 or younger and on your parents’ plan. In fact, the majority of people can still purchase a plan for $75 or less. If you have health care coverage, it is still in effect until there is an actual change in the law, which takes time. So, make your medical appointments, and get the care you deserve and are entitled to under the law.

What the AHCA Threatens to Do to Women’s Health

In particular, the AHCA would:

  • Take away health coverage for 24 million people

  • “Defund” Planned Parenthood by blocking people who rely on Medicaid from accessing preventive care at its health centers — including birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment

  • Reduce access to no-cost preventive services, including birth control

  • End protections that keep insurers from charging people with pre-existing conditions unaffordable rates — allowing insurance companies to once again charge people tens of thousands of dollars a month because they had cancer

  • Impose a nationwide ban on private insurance coverage of abortion

  • Undermine Essential Health Benefits — including maternity coverage and prescription drugs, which disproportionately affect women.

  • Gut the Medicaid program, which approximately 1 in 4 women of reproductive age rely on to access no-cost, critical reproductive health care (such as birth control, lifesaving cancer screenings, and maternity care)

4 Ways to Fight Back Now

Infuriated? You’re not alone. Here are the top three ways to stand up for health care and stand with Planned Parenthood right now.

#1: Call Your Senators
This is the most important way to take action right now. Use our easy online form to call your U.S. senators. We’ll give you a script so you can tell them to protect health care and stand with Planned Parenthood.

#2: Tag Your Senators on Facebook
Do you notice when somebody tags you on Facebook? Chances are,  your answer is “yes” — and that goes for your senators, too. Our simple form automatically tags your senators and gives you time to edit the post.

#3: Tweet at Your Senators
If you have Twitter, take a moment to tweet at your senators. Our easy-to-use form automatically finds your senators’ handles. It also gives you a sample tweet if you don’t want to write your own.

#4: Tweet at Reps who Voted Against Women’s Health
Click on the link above and scroll own for our list of representatives who voted in favor of this dangerous bill. If you see your House member, tell them you will not forget that they stripped access to care — and will not forgive.


If I’m murdered

I want to share this in English because I think this is very relevant to every women out there.

On May 3rd, the body of Lesvy Berlin Rivera Osorio was found inside one of UNAM’s campus on Mexico city. She was left propped on a phone booth, strangled with the cord of the public phone around her neck. She was 22 years old.

The PGJ (not sure how to translate but it’s something like the General Court of Justice prosecutor) recently released a statement that was brought up based on several interviews with people that were close to Lesvy, including her boyfriend.

They were very good at mentioning that Lesvy had not been attending classes as she had dropped out of school recently.

They were very good at mentioning that she drank.

They were very good at mentioning that she lived with her boyfriend outside of marriage.

They were very good at mentioning that the night she was murdered she had been out with friends probably either drinking or doing drugs.

They were very good at mentioning that she dared to be outside, alone, at night.

They were very good at pinning the blame of a murder case on the victim herself, but they were no closer to finding the actual perpetrator. (You know, the person who ACTUALLY STRANGLED HER WITH A PHONE CORD?)

They used the phrase “found dead” instead of calling it what it really was: MURDER.

They made no mention whatsoever of her boyfriend being a suspect, despite the fact that he was the last person to see her alive, that they had attended the same party that night, and that they had a fight right before her murder after which (according to him) they parted ways angrily.

I’m not saying he is guilty, but perhaps if she had been a “good girl, grade A student” she would deserve justice and a proper investigation of her death instead of the PGJ violating the confidentiality of a still ongoing investigation by releasing these personal facts Lesvy in the media, as if that justified her murder?

I am tired of this and I’ve been holding back tears all day.

WE ARE BEING MURDERED, AND THE BLAME IS PUT ON US.

Violence against women happens everywhere, not just in distant places. Lesvy was killed in the middle of a college campus.

If you were killed, what facts about your imperfect life do you think they would bring up on the statements, on the news media?

This is how the hashtag #SiMeMatan (If I’m murdered) began. Because it seems to be always our fault, for being at the wrong place, with the wrong clothes, or at the wrong time (things not fit for “proper ladies”) and never the fault of the person perpetrating the crime.

Back when I saw Kelly Oxford’s hashtag about sharing our stories of harassment I remembered a similar movement that was made in Latin America a bit earlier called #MiPrimerAcoso (my first harassment) I realized that we face the same struggles, regardless of what language we speak.

This is why I’m writing this now, because I think you should know about Lesvy’s story and we should all be heard.

So here goes mine:

If I’m murdered:

It would be because I lived by myself in my apartment.
It would be because I confront people that catcall me on the street.
It would be because I like wearing knee high boots and stockings.
It would be because I dyed my hair a lot in whacky colors.
It would be because I hang out more with men than women.
It would be because I go out alone at night without the company of a man.
It would be because I drink when I go out.
It would be because I was flirty and friendly to everyone.
It would be because choose to have sex without being married.

You know what the worst part is about this?

That every woman who is tweeting this hashtag is very well aware that they could be next, and that the official responses might not be too different from Lesvy’s case.

Heck, even women that have marched in outrage at UNAM and women that have tweeted disgust at what happened have started receiving threats online.

Please stay together, and stay strong.

4

Economic security can’t be achieved without reproductive freedom.

In order for women to participate as full citizens in society and have the same economic opportunities, we must have paid family leave and access to affordable birth control and abortion care.