women's struggle

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Gulaab Gang is a 2014 Indian crime drama film centered on the struggle of women in the country.

The Gulaab Gang members are activists and vigilantes in Bundelkhand Uttar and Madhya Pradesh. They wear pink sarees and take up issues like domestic violence, the dowry system, rape, electricity matters, and education.

This movie concept really deserved a medal for. This movie is also a true story, the Gulaab Gang is now active in India. And this is what we need here in the US!

Today is the first day of Women’s History Month, Tumblr. For the next 31 days we’re going to celebrate women’s accomplishments, honor women’s stories, and draw attention to struggles women are still facing, even in 2017.

How we’re celebrating:

This special Women’s History Month explore page will be frequently updated with the top WHM posts found on Tumblr, because the best stuff always comes from you. Answer Times will be held, and important topics will be explored over on Action (@action). We also made some highly relevant stickers for you to put on your photos and GIFs, available right now in the Tumblr app. Take a look:

Why this matters:

👆 See that Planned Parenthood sticker? While we’ve got plenty to celebrate, we also have crucial fights to fight. Women around the world are currently facing the possible revocation of basic human rights and access to adequate health care. Here in the US, Planned Parenthood (@plannedparenthood) is set to lose all federal funding. 5 million people use PP’s services every single year. That includes access to sex education, birth control, prenatal care, STD testing, cervical cancer screenings, abortions, and so much more.

How to help:

We ask that you join us in donating to this irreplaceable non-profit or help out any other way you can, if you have the means for either. If you don’t, maybe you know someone who does. Could you pass it along to them?

Tumblr stands with Planned Parenthood. Tumblr stands with women everywhere, regardless of sexuality, race, religion, or gender identity. We’re in this together.

Oh, and If you’re attending SXSW this year, we’d like to invite you to a couple things jointly held by Tumblr and Planned Parenthood. There will be a panel on activism and a rally featuring live performances by Sleigh Bells, Girlpool (@girlpoool), Hoops, and PVRIS (@thisispvris). Find the details here.

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#BlackWomenAtWork uncovers the everyday struggles black women face at work

Black women are fed up with the way they are treated in the workplace so they are sharing their experiences on Twitter.

Activist Brittany Packnett kicked off the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork in response to the disrespectful ways in which two prominent black women were treated by public figures throughout the day. 

As a way to help address these issues, Packnett encouraged black women online to share some of their real-life experiences at work.  

“I wanted the hashtag to make the invisible visible, to challenge non-black people to stand with black women not just when this happens on television, but in the cube right next to them,” she said. “I’m also glad stories of triumph and achievement got shared through the hashtag as well ― black women are more than just our woes, we are triumphant.”

Latinx women are breathtaking. Latinx women deserve to be treated like human beings because we are. Latinx women are so capable and strong and intelligent and amazing. Latinx women have come so far and deserve so much more. Latinx women deserve to be happy, healthy, and safe. Latinx women are multitalented and giving and we don’t hear it enough. Latinx women have broken barriers, can break barriers, and will break barriers. Latinx women are so precious. Latinx women are allowed to cry and have feelings and feel sad. Latinx women need to be treated with more respect. Latinx women deserve the world. Latinx women must be respected at all times. Latinx women are hardworking and discredited. Latinx women stand together and call out abuse. Latinx women are humans. Latinx women are deserving and great. Latinx women face so much adversity and don’t deserve the hatred they face. Latinx women are allowed to feel angry without people fetishizing their anger. Latinx women are deserving of life and respect no matter where they were born. Latinx women are not creatures, but humans. Latinx women are not spices, but humans. Latinx women are allowed to speak out against things that are unjust. Latinx women need more representation in the media. Latinx women come in all colors, shapes, sizes, and from all over the world. Latinx women speak any language. Latinx women are introverted or extroverted or ambiverts. Latinxs women are allowed to be shy or outgoing. Latinx women are doctors, lawyers, stay at home mothers, teachers, janitors, chefs, cashiers, hairstylists, dancers, politicians, sex workers, accountants, vets, dentists, volunteers, artists, public speakers, managers, therapists, nannies, models, writers, athletes- everything and all deserving of the utmost respect. Latinx women own their own bodies and are in control of their own lives. Latinx women love. Latinx women are allowed to feel numb. Latinx women are revolutionary. Latinx women are, but not limited to, bisexual, pansexual, lesbian, unsure, trans, asexual- unending. Latinx women are Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, Atheistic, Agnostic, Pagan and more. Latinx women do not deserve to be fetishized. Latinx women are humans, not sex objects. Latinx women are allowed to struggle with physical, mental, and developmental illnesses. Latinx women are survivors. Latinx women are warriors. Latinx women are allowed to laugh and cry. Latinx women are allowed to rest. Latinx women are so much more than what is written in this post. Latinx women deserve justice. Latinx women deserve to not be spoken over. Latinx women deserve positivity. Latinx women deserve to not have their issues derailed or ignored. Latinx women are so beautiful.

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Five storied female NASA pioneers will soon grace toy-store shelves, in Lego form.

The Danish company announced on Tuesday that it would produce the Women of NASA set, submitted by science writer Maia Weinstock.

“Women have played critical roles throughout the history of the U.S. space program,” Weinstock wrote in her project proposal. “Yet in many cases, their contributions are unknown or under-appreciated – especially as women have historically struggled to gain acceptance in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.”

She said the set is meant to shed light on the rich history of women in STEM professions.

Women Of NASA To Be Immortalized — In Lego Form

Photos: Maia Weinstock

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The revolution here in Rojava is a women’s revolution. From the front lines of the fight against ISIS, to running the cantons to trade unions that ensure all working women have their voices heard.

International women’s day has special significance here, with events and demonstrations taking place all over the region. We stand with women worldwide in the struggle against patriarchy, and today we stand with the women of Ireland. We call on the Irish Government to repeal the 8th amendment and allow women rights over their own bodies! Today news reporters, trade unionists, HPC (civilian self-defence units) heard about the strike and stood in solidarity.

Today women across Qamishlo support.

Strike 4 Repeal

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#no means no

when there’s a girl who finally likes you and you think she’s going to confess to you but you like another girl so before she gets the chance to tell you she likes you, you start telling her how there’s another girl who you like but then an older city boy appears and you assume it’s her boyfriend and that you completely misunderstood the situation

Young girls (and boys) need more heroines like Jyn Erso: complex, messy, morally gray, angry, unsmiling, volatile women who fight and struggle and feel deeply without feeling the need to apologize for it.

We have enough heroines who are cinnamon rolls, too pure for this world and plenty of heroines who are stoic bad-ass archetypes out for revenge or whatever. We need more Jyns: ordinary women in extraordinary circumstances who don’t exist to be likable, who can be angry and wrong and passionate and sad and apathetic and selfish and righteous all in the same story. 

And I say heroines because heroes have plenty of these characters who are admired and loved and understood. There needs to be more heroines like Jyn because there should be no one (or only two) right ways to be. You don’t have to be a virgin or a whore nor a damsel or a warrior. You can be somewhere in between, too. 

People who complain all the time about lesbians wanting to retain butch and femme as terms intimately connected to lesbianism are honestly so deeply self-centered that it’s absurd. Imagine looking at a contemporary culture set on erasing every single aspect of lesbianism that many of us hold close, from the term, to the concept, to our attractions not being phrased properly, to the specific way lesbianism connects a lot of women to other women not just sexually but broadly, seeing a group of women struggling to even be allowed to name ourselves let alone realize and act on our sexualities in the face of a culture which wants us to collapse into any number of categories, from “queer” because it is more progressive to no longer seeing yourself as a woman if you’re too gnc, and going “Uh those mean dykes won’t let me have this word that I want because I think it’s pretty.”


It’s not even like we’re in the majority- the culture that’s set on erasing lesbianism from its conceptions of sexuality has already almost fully appropriated our terminologies and concepts to be for everyone rather than for lesbians. So a few lesbians on the internet retain a special respect for a historically important way of living and seeing yourself in relation to lesbianism, and that’s too much? Fuck you honestly.

By request, here’s a video of me dying between sets 😩😭😓 with a little commentary of what I was thinking in the midst of it all!! I left the sound on so y'all could hear me wheezing 😩 HIIT will have you reconsidering your whole life 😂 asking what would Jesus do? What would Beyoncé do? Just try the workout, you’ll see!

if ur feminism does not acknowledge the specific struggles women of color face, ur feminism is worthless!!! if ur feminism does not acknowledge the specific struggles trans women face, ur feminism is toxic!!! if ur feminism does not acknowledge the specific struggles women of foreign countries face, your feminism is xenophobic!!! if ur feminism does not acknowledge the specific struggles disabled women face, ur feminism is ableist!!! white cis abled women should acknowledge their privilege over woc, trans women, disabled women, and women of other countries. support ALL types of women, not just the ones who already benefit from some form of privilege

French Lesbian Films: Recommendations

Water Lilies (2007)

Summer in a new suburb outside Paris. Nothing to do but look at the ceiling. Marie, Anne and Floriane are 15. Their paths cross in the corridors at the local swimming pool, where love and desire make a sudden, dramatic appearance.

Breathe (2014)

It is tale of two teenage girls who develop an intense and dangerous friendship. Charlie is a 17-year-old girl tortured by doubt, disillusionment and solitude. When the beautiful and self-confident Sarah arrives and the two become inseparable, Charlie is thrilled to feel alive, fulfilled and invincible in their intense friendship. But as Sarah tires of Charlie and begins to look elsewhere for a new friend, their friendship takes an ominous turn.

Summertime (2015)

There was little chance, in the year 1971, that Carole, a Paris Spanish teacher and feminist militant, would ever meet Delphine, the daughter of a couple of Limousin farmers. But they did meet and not only did they come across each other but they fell passionately in love as well. Unfortunately, Delphine’s father fell victim to a stroke, and the young woman had no other choice but to go back home to help her mother run the family farm. Carole, who was so smitten by Delphine, couldn’t stand the estrangement and decided to join her lover at the farm. But could feminism and lesbianism easily be transferred to the countryside and its standards of the time…?

Blue Is the Warmest Color (2013)

Adèle’s life is changed when she meets Emma, a young woman with blue hair, who will allow her to discover desire and to assert herself as a woman and as an adult. In front of others, Adèle grows, seeks herself, loses herself, and ultimately finds herself through love and loss.

Secret Things (2002)

Two young women find themselves struggling to survive in Paris, street-wise Nathalie, a stripper, and naïve Sandrine, a barmaid. Together, they discover that sex can be used to their advantage, and pleasure.

Therese and Isabelle (1968)

Two young girls experience awakening sexuality in the heated atmosphere of a Swiss girls’ boarding school.

The Page Turner (2006)

The girl Mélanie Prouvost is an aspirant pianist and her parents make her application to the Conservatory. During the entrance exam, she begins with a great performance but she is distracted by one member of the admittance board, Ariane, and she fails. Years later, Mélanie, unrecognized by Ariane, becomes her page turner. And thus begins her carefully planned revenge against the woman that destroyed her dreams.

Les Biches (1968)

Architect Paul Thomas insinuates himself into the relationship of two bisexual women living in a St. Tropez villa with tragic consequences.

As feminists we are here for women, and that includes all women across the globe.

Dina Ali is a Saudi women who was caught fleeing Saudi Arabia hoping to get refuge in Australia and then sent back to her abusive family. Her family then had her arrested and she will most likely be spending her life there, if she’s not killed in a honor killing.

Saudi women face several difficulties as they can’t do a lot of things without their male guardian permission. Their male guardian can be their father, husband or even their son, basically any male relative. They are in full control of the women as they have the right to make decisions regarding her education, work, traveling, marriage, health care.

Western feminists are in a better position to speak up against injustices. We should support other women not just the struggles of western feminism. Feminism is not feminism if it’s not for all women