women's struggle

it always makes my heart hurt seeing women struggle and agonize over whether they’re attracted to men or not. let me present you with the alternative: it isn’t important. what’s important is what makes you feel good and fulfilled. maybe that isn’t same gender attraction yet (because gods know internalized homophobia is a monster and a half) but if your struggle with being attracted to men or not is upsetting or harming you– here’s permission to let it go. it doesn’t have to matter. you are free. let it fall away from you like rain off a roof. nurture what nurtures you.

Today is the first day of Women’s History Month, Tumblr. For the next 31 days we’re going to celebrate women’s accomplishments, honor women’s stories, and draw attention to struggles women are still facing, even in 2017.

How we’re celebrating:

This special Women’s History Month explore page will be frequently updated with the top WHM posts found on Tumblr, because the best stuff always comes from you. Answer Times will be held, and important topics will be explored over on Action (@action). We also made some highly relevant stickers for you to put on your photos and GIFs, available right now in the Tumblr app. Take a look:

Why this matters:

👆 See that Planned Parenthood sticker? While we’ve got plenty to celebrate, we also have crucial fights to fight. Women around the world are currently facing the possible revocation of basic human rights and access to adequate health care. Here in the US, Planned Parenthood (@plannedparenthood) is set to lose all federal funding. 5 million people use PP’s services every single year. That includes access to sex education, birth control, prenatal care, STD testing, cervical cancer screenings, abortions, and so much more.

How to help:

We ask that you join us in donating to this irreplaceable non-profit or help out any other way you can, if you have the means for either. If you don’t, maybe you know someone who does. Could you pass it along to them?

Tumblr stands with Planned Parenthood. Tumblr stands with women everywhere, regardless of sexuality, race, religion, or gender identity. We’re in this together.

Oh, and If you’re attending SXSW this year, we’d like to invite you to a couple things jointly held by Tumblr and Planned Parenthood. There will be a panel on activism and a rally featuring live performances by Sleigh Bells, Girlpool (@girlpoool), Hoops, and PVRIS (@thisispvris). Find the details here.

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#BlackWomenAtWork uncovers the everyday struggles black women face at work

Black women are fed up with the way they are treated in the workplace so they are sharing their experiences on Twitter.

Activist Brittany Packnett kicked off the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork in response to the disrespectful ways in which two prominent black women were treated by public figures throughout the day. 

As a way to help address these issues, Packnett encouraged black women online to share some of their real-life experiences at work.  

“I wanted the hashtag to make the invisible visible, to challenge non-black people to stand with black women not just when this happens on television, but in the cube right next to them,” she said. “I’m also glad stories of triumph and achievement got shared through the hashtag as well ― black women are more than just our woes, we are triumphant.”

15 Trans People who Have Made History

I feel it is extremely important to know about the people in our community who came before us. Throughout history trans people have made history by acting as activists, advocates, and just by being themselves in a world at that against them. This list is by no means complete but the point is to highlight some of the trans people who have made history for our community. 

1) Frances Thompson: Frances was most likely the first trans person to testify before a congressional committee in the US. In 1866 she was a victim of the Memphis Riot. The riot occurred when a group of white men went into a neighbourhood where former slaves, such as Frances, lived. They burned buildings and attacked the former slaves. It was on this matter that she testified before the committee. Ten years later she was arrested for “transvestism.”

2) Lucy Hicks Anderson: Lucy was born in 1886 and began living as a woman a young age. She was first married in 1929 and then attempted to get married again in 1944.However, in 1944 her marriage was denied and she was accused of perjury for saying that she was a woman. After then she became one of the first fighters for marriage equality in America.

3) Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson: Marsha is most known for being one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riot in 1969 however her involvement in the LGBT community stretches beyond that. She was the co-founder of S.T.A.R. which provided support and resources for homeless trans youth. She was also heavily involved in the Gay Liberation Front. She fought for LGBT rights and for people living with HIV and AIDS. She supported the community until her life was cut short in 1992 under suspicious circumstances.

4) Sylvia Rivera: Sylvia was also one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riots. At only seventeen years old she co-founded S.T.A.R. She was also a founder of the Gay Liberation Front. She spent a lot of time advocating for trans people, drag queens, and other people who were not included in the mainstream gay rights movement including fighting against the exclusion of transgender people from the Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act in New York. She was an advocate for the community until her death in 2002.

5) Miss Major Griffin-Gracy: Miss Major was another leader at the Stonewall Riots in 1969 and the community in New York at the time. In the late 1970s she moved to San Diego and started grassroots movements such as working with a food bank to serve trans women who were incarcerated, struggling with addiction, or were homeless. During the AIDS epidemic she provided people with healthcare and organized funerals often one or more a week.  In 1990 she moved to the San Francisco area where she worked with many HIV/AIDs organizations. In 2003 she began working at the Transgender GenderVariant Intersex Justice Project where she works to help transgender women who have been imprisoned. She continues to work as an activist to this day.

6) Hiromasa Ando: Hiromasa was a professional speedboat racer in Japan and publically transitioned when he was given permission to start competing as a male in 2002 becoming the first openly trans person in the sport. He also is one of the first openly trans athletes in the world. 

7) Aya Kamikawa: In 2003 Aya made history when she became the first openly transgender person to be elected into office in Japan. She has also worked for the LGBT community both as a politician and before as a committee member for Trans-Net Japan.

8) Trudie Jackson: Trudie Jackson is a long-time activist for the LGBT and Native American Communities. She has worked with the ASU Rainbow Coalition, the Native American Student Organization, The National LGBTQ Task Force, and the Southwest American Indian Rainbow Gathering. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Equality Arizona Skip Schrader Spirit of Activism Award, one of the 2013 Trans 100, and Echo Magazine’s 2013 Woman of the Year. She is a huge advocate for the Native American trans community.

9) Kim Coco Iwamoto: When elected to the Hawaiian Board of Education in 2006 she held the highest office of any openly trans person in America. She served two terms on the Board of Education and is now a commissioner on the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission.

10) Diego Sanchez: Sanchez was the first openly trans person to hold a senior congressional staff position on Capitol Hill in America when he was appointed by Barney Frank in 2008.

11) Kylar Broadas: Broadas is an attorney, professor, and the first openly trans person to testify in front of the U.S. Supreme Court when he spoke in support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act in 2012. In 2010 he founded the Trans People of Color Coalition.

12) Isis King: She became the first openly trans person to be on America’s Next Top Model in 2008. Her openess and involvement in the show and involvement in the show attracted a lot of both negative and positive attention. She has continued to work as a model, role-model, and advocate for transgender people. 

13) Blake Brockington: Blake first made headlines when he became the first openly transgender high school homecoming king in North Carolina. He was also an activist for the LGBT community, transgender youth and fought against police brutality. Sadly, Brockington lost his life at the age of 18 in 2015 after committing suicide.

14) Diane Marie Rodriguez Zambrano: She has been a human rights and LGBT rights activist in Ecuador for many years. In 2009 she sued the Civil Registry to change her name and set precedent for other trans people to be able to change their names. In 2013 she became the first openly trans person, or LGBT person, in Ecuador to run for office.

15) Ruby Corado: She is an activist born in El Salvador but living in America. She was involved in the Coalition to Clarify the D.C. Human Rights Act which was changed the act to include gender identity and expression. In 2012 she opened Casa Ruby which is the only bilingual and multicultural LGBT organization in Washington, D.C. She has been working for human rights for over 20 years.

Latinx women are breathtaking. Latinx women deserve to be treated like human beings because we are. Latinx women are so capable and strong and intelligent and amazing. Latinx women have come so far and deserve so much more. Latinx women deserve to be happy, healthy, and safe. Latinx women are multitalented and giving and we don’t hear it enough. Latinx women have broken barriers, can break barriers, and will break barriers. Latinx women are so precious. Latinx women are allowed to cry and have feelings and feel sad. Latinx women need to be treated with more respect. Latinx women deserve the world. Latinx women must be respected at all times. Latinx women are hardworking and discredited. Latinx women stand together and call out abuse. Latinx women are humans. Latinx women are deserving and great. Latinx women face so much adversity and don’t deserve the hatred they face. Latinx women are allowed to feel angry without people fetishizing their anger. Latinx women are deserving of life and respect no matter where they were born. Latinx women are not creatures, but humans. Latinx women are not spices, but humans. Latinx women are allowed to speak out against things that are unjust. Latinx women need more representation in the media. Latinx women come in all colors, shapes, sizes, and from all over the world. Latinx women speak any language. Latinx women are introverted or extroverted or ambiverts. Latinxs women are allowed to be shy or outgoing. Latinx women are doctors, lawyers, stay at home mothers, teachers, janitors, chefs, cashiers, hairstylists, dancers, politicians, sex workers, accountants, vets, dentists, volunteers, artists, public speakers, managers, therapists, nannies, models, writers, athletes- everything and all deserving of the utmost respect. Latinx women own their own bodies and are in control of their own lives. Latinx women love. Latinx women are allowed to feel numb. Latinx women are revolutionary. Latinx women are, but not limited to, bisexual, pansexual, lesbian, unsure, trans, asexual- unending. Latinx women are Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, Atheistic, Agnostic, Pagan and more. Latinx women do not deserve to be fetishized. Latinx women are humans, not sex objects. Latinx women are allowed to struggle with physical, mental, and developmental illnesses. Latinx women are survivors. Latinx women are warriors. Latinx women are allowed to laugh and cry. Latinx women are allowed to rest. Latinx women are so much more than what is written in this post. Latinx women deserve justice. Latinx women deserve to not be spoken over. Latinx women deserve positivity. Latinx women deserve to not have their issues derailed or ignored. Latinx women are so beautiful.

Young girls (and boys) need more heroines like Jyn Erso: complex, messy, morally gray, angry, unsmiling, volatile women who fight and struggle and feel deeply without feeling the need to apologize for it.

We have enough heroines who are cinnamon rolls, too pure for this world and plenty of heroines who are stoic bad-ass archetypes out for revenge or whatever. We need more Jyns: ordinary women in extraordinary circumstances who don’t exist to be likable, who can be angry and wrong and passionate and sad and apathetic and selfish and righteous all in the same story. 

And I say heroines because heroes have plenty of these characters who are admired and loved and understood. There needs to be more heroines like Jyn because there should be no one (or only two) right ways to be. You don’t have to be a virgin or a whore nor a damsel or a warrior. You can be somewhere in between, too. 

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Five storied female NASA pioneers will soon grace toy-store shelves, in Lego form.

The Danish company announced on Tuesday that it would produce the Women of NASA set, submitted by science writer Maia Weinstock.

“Women have played critical roles throughout the history of the U.S. space program,” Weinstock wrote in her project proposal. “Yet in many cases, their contributions are unknown or under-appreciated – especially as women have historically struggled to gain acceptance in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.”

She said the set is meant to shed light on the rich history of women in STEM professions.

Women Of NASA To Be Immortalized — In Lego Form

Photos: Maia Weinstock

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The revolution here in Rojava is a women’s revolution. From the front lines of the fight against ISIS, to running the cantons to trade unions that ensure all working women have their voices heard.

International women’s day has special significance here, with events and demonstrations taking place all over the region. We stand with women worldwide in the struggle against patriarchy, and today we stand with the women of Ireland. We call on the Irish Government to repeal the 8th amendment and allow women rights over their own bodies! Today news reporters, trade unionists, HPC (civilian self-defence units) heard about the strike and stood in solidarity.

Today women across Qamishlo support.

Strike 4 Repeal

of course there’s an element of sexuality that ur born with. i truly believe i was born gay but the fact is that we as women are smothered with compulsory heterosexuality and heteronormativity quite literally from birth which makes lesbianism something that requires reclamation. it requires choice. it requires denying any attraction u may feel to men bcs there’s no catch all way to tell if that attraction is authentic or not…. a lesbian is a woman who chooses women. prioritizes and loves and embraces women romantically/sexually, exclusively. ur not bad or fake if u are a gay girl but still are unsure how to unblur the lines between true attraction and compulsory heterosexuality. u just have to choose women.

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#no means no

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I think there’s a struggle of working and being at home with your baby. I feel like, for me, asking for help is a struggle many women have. [Moms] shouldn’t feel like they have to do everything. They can ask their friends and their family to help them. When you become a mom, you have to do the laundry, take care of the baby, and you have to work, [but] you shouldn’t put yourself in a position where you feel guilty to ask for help.

Women outside of the African diaspora, please stop saying "rock your natural hair."

From straightening to color processing, we put our hair through a lot to achieve the looks we want. Rarely do we consider working with what we already have. Think about it: when was the last time you wore your hair as is? This season, we’re challenging you to embrace your hair and rock a style that works with your natural texture, not against it.

Not convinced? Just take a look at the three POPSUGAR staffers ahead who have each come to love their unique hair texture over the years and revealed their tips for showing it off. Whatever your hair type, their relatable stories and gorgeous no-fuss styles will inspire you to rethink it the next time you find yourself reaching for a hot tool.

(cont. POPSUGAR)

This article isn’t all that important, but look at the women chosen to “rock their natural hair.”

Who thinks of these women when you hear the phrase natural hair? I just want to make a plea:  Women outside of the African diaspora, please stop saying “rock your natural hair.”  You can call it virgin.  You can call it unprocessed.  You can call it anything other than natural hair because that’s a movement for Black women.  

I’m not saying this as part of an overreach of cultural appropriation accusations at all, because this has nothing to do with that.  This isn’t the n-word conversation where the answer to “can I say it too?” is always an emphatic NO! from the majority of people. And I have no problem with women of all backgrounds embracing the hair as it sprouts from their heads without the addition of heat or chemicals.  I support any trend where women aren’t doing damage to part of themselves to fit a beauty standard.

But.  The women in these photos have never not been allowed to wear their hair without chemicals or damaging processes.  There has never been a point in history these women couldn’t just wash and go, even if that meant a wash and go with a hair band.  The hair types on these women are always acceptable in any business or social situation.  They’ve never been denied a job because of their hair.  They’ve never been told they’re aggressive or too political because of their hair.  Their hair has never been illegal.  (You can have a different conversation about countries where women have to cover their hair, but that applies to all women, not just women of a certain race, and it applies to all hair, not just hair that’s kinky, so the legality isn’t based on hair at all.)

Black women rocking their natural hair has nothing to do with white women learning to manage their frizz.  Those are two separate conversations.  One is about actually fitting into society and the other is about managing a beauty standard that always caters to women who look like you anyway.  The natural hair movement is about re-teaching Black women how to care for their hair after all of that knowledge was lost to our people when we were dragged to this continent and forced to use sheep shears and banned from traditional African hairstyles.  Natural hair blogs and messageboards and haircare lines aren’t just educational resources, but emotional ones as well, where Black women can discuss their struggles embracing their natural kinks and coils in a society where the beauty standard for hair is the women in these pictures instead.  When non-Black women take up the charge of “rocking their natural hair” it dilutes the conversation and it makes it harder to connect.  There are way more non-Black women than Black women in this country and they will drown out the voices who needed the support the most if allowed to.

So as a courtesy, find some other banner.  The natural hair movement wasn’t started for y'all or by y'all and it’s not as integral to y'all’s culture or survival.  So just use a different term.  Once again, y’all saw something cute and catchy that Black people were doing, wanted to capitalize on it, and whitewashed the meaning out of it.  Skipping your weekly blowout in the summer has nothing to do with taking the risk of being fired if you waltz into work without a mid-length sew-in and your coils on display instead.  Find another way to share white girl hair tips.  Please.

Edit: I really don’t get what’s so hard to understand about this.

Dear sisters,

be whatever the fuck you want. today and forever.

be as carefree as you want

Originally posted by yoncehaunted

Originally posted by africaaaanqueen

be as sexy with that booty as you want

Originally posted by namiqiy

be as incendiary as you want

Originally posted by mormone

be as much like a princess as you want

Originally posted by hxnnxhblogs

Originally posted by theblogofeternalstench

be as revolutionary as you want

Originally posted by mansplainedmarxist

be as natural as you want

Originally posted by beautiful-nerd

Originally posted by afronizando

be as fearless as you want

Originally posted by wecastmusic

be as unapologetically excellent as you want

Originally posted by romvn

Originally posted by ydbeatsssmusic

Originally posted by jowiebs

be as angry as you want

Originally posted by emmaduvals

Originally posted by xo-bbygirl-xo

be as loved as you want

Originally posted by empgifs

Originally posted by darkcrownbitches

Originally posted by kamilamb

Happy international women’s day to all the black women out there struggling, mothering, loving, breathing, praying, dancing, resisting, laughing and BEING.

You are loved, you are worthy, you are magic.

In capitalist societies, women in property-holding families reproduce heirs; women in working-class families reproduce generations of workers for the system.

The capitalist class has become dependent on this method of ‘privatized reproduction’ within the working-class family because it lessens capitalists’ own financial responsibility for the reproduction of labor power, which is instead largely supplied by unpaid domestic labor performed primarily by women. The precondition for women’s liberation thus requires an end to their unpaid labor inside the family. This, in turn, necessitates a socialist transformation of society, which cannot be achieved gradually but only through a process of social revolution, in a decisive battle between classes.

—  Sharon Smith, Women and Socialism: Class, Race, and Capital (2015)

when there’s a girl who finally likes you and you think she’s going to confess to you but you like another girl so before she gets the chance to tell you she likes you, you start telling her how there’s another girl who you like but then an older city boy appears and you assume it’s her boyfriend and that you completely misunderstood the situation

Couple of facts about me

1. I am NOT pro-black. I am pro-black women and children ONLY. There is a difference.

2. I don’t care to preserve the black family. Black women have been trying to preserve the black family for centuries. It’s time we become selfish with our energy, time and loyalty.

3. I don’t care about #blacklove. If you are with or if you find a black man that loves you and treats you like a queen, that’s great. However, contrary to popular belief, black women DO have options and I encourage them to explore all of those options. 

4. I am NOT black male-identified. I do not coddle black men. I do not say “not all”. I do not give them the benefit of the doubt or make excuses for them. I call them out actively and vehemently and I will never stop calling them out for their hatred and degradation of black women.

5. I don’t encourage black women to struggle. Struggle love is dead. I am very much so ANTI-STRUGGLE.

6. I realize that not every black woman is my sister. Some of them are just as evil and maniacal as black men and they will go down with the ship. Tough, but I don’t care!

7. Finally, I do not encourage black women to mule, suffer, or “hold a brotha down”. No one has ever held us down so why should we strap ourselves down with other people’s dilemmas? We need to stop with the kumbaya shit because time and time again we continue to kumbaya with our enemies.