women's history

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Last year I did a few write-ups and drawings about some lady fighters from history who fought openly as their gender (there are plenty of disguised-as-a-man soldiers and plenty of trans soldiers, but those are outside the scope of this series).  This is by no means an exhaustive list; there were plenty of great figures that my schedule didn’t permit me to tackle (at least not yet).  But as Women’s History Month gets started tomorrow, I thought y’all might enjoy reading about some of history’s toughest broads.

Women that have made history (and their signs)

Aries: Billie Holiday (African American jazz musician)

Taurus: Sandra Day O’Connor (first woman appointed to the United States Supreme Court)

Gemini: Chien Shiung Wu (Chinese American nuclear physicist that contributed to the Manhattan Project and is often recognized as the First Lady of Physics)

Cancer: Frida Kahlo (Mexican painter known for her powerful self-portraits and artwork)

Leo: Amelia Earhart (first female pilot to fly across the Atlantic Ocean solo)

Virgo: Mother Teresa (20th Century symbol of humanitarianism known for her charity work and dedication to the Catholic Church)

Libra: Eleanor Roosevelt (changed the role of the First Lady as an activist, politician, and diplomat)

Scorpio: Elizabeth Cady Stanton (early leader of the women’s rights movement and writer of the Declaration of Sentiments)

Sagittarius: Emily Dickinson (revolutionized the world of poetry with her unique and unconventional writing style)

Capricorn: Zora Neale Hurston (African American novelist and anthropologist that gained notoriety during the Harlem Renaissance)

Aquarius: Corazon Aquino (first female president not only in the Philippines but in all of Asia as well)

Pisces: Kate Sheppard (appears on New Zealand’s 10 dollar note as a result of being the country’s most famous suffragette)

anonymous asked:

Hi cunt women are lesser animals,with usually smaller brains, less neurons, and less synapses. That's why women rely more on instinct and emotion, rather than logic or reason. That also explains women's relative lack of intellectual accomplishments or invention over the past 3,000 years (and more). Your gender's main contributions have been singing, giving birth, cooking and cleaning, Nearly everything women have accomplished is with help from men or from a group of men. Women deserve no rights

Hi dickhead I’m feeling petty this morning so I’m gonna eviscerate this swill part by part. It seems like the concept of basic science confuses you. I’ll start by citing this article for you and provide some choice quotes. It used a heavily peer-reviewed study and the methodology was completely sound (i read the whole goddamn original work and several of its external citations).

“On average, for example, men tend to have a larger amygdala, a region associated with emotion. Such differences are small and highly influenced by the environment, yet they have still been used to paint a binary picture of the human brain,“

“Depending on whether the researchers looked at gray matter, white matter, or the diffusion tensor imaging data, between 23% and 53% of brains contained a mix of regions that fell on the male-end and female-end of the spectrum. Very few of the brains—between 0% and 8%—contained all male or all female structures.” 

A list of early inventions by women (it includes elevated rail-lines, Kevlar, and the submarine telescope! the lack of patents taken out by women early on is actually because men made it illegal for a woman to hold a patent in her name until the early 1900s. those darn men, always inhibiting progress)

 A detailed list of several well-known contemporary female scholars

Here’s Wikipedia’s list of Muslim women who made significant intellectual achievements

A list of 30 Black women who made history

A detailed history of Asian women’s contributions

Notable Native American women from the past 350 years

Here’s TWO articles on the contributions of trans women in contemporary culture (the first one also includes nonbinary people, just a heads up. It seemed more relevant than many of the others tho)

You know what fuck you here’s 50 more women who did important shit

Wikipedia’s history of lesbian literature (which lists a lot of books and authors)

Tbh I do agree with you on the singing being a main contribution, just because women have nicer voices (in my opinion) and are much more likely to use their songwriting expertise to push activist and progressive agendas.

Maybe don’t come into my inbox with this shit when you don’t know what you’re talking about? Put away the 18th century medical book and take a chill pill.

Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, the first all-African-American, all-female unit to serve overseas in World War II, take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d'Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake. Rouen, France. May 27, 1945.

(US National Archives)

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Kathrine Switzer, first woman to officially run the Boston Marathon, is racing it this year

  • Women haven’t exactly crossed the finish line when it comes to gender equality, but we’ve certainly come a long way since Kathrine Switzer first hit the pavement at the Boston Marathon.
  • It was 1967 when Switzer, then a 20-year-old journalism student at Syracuse University, became the first woman to officially enter the historic marathon.
  • At the time, women were woefully marginalized in the world of athletics. 
  • According to CNN, Switzer had been training with the men’s cross-country team at Syracuse when she decided to enter the race, with little encouragement from her coach. 
  • In her memoir, Switzer recalled the Syracuse coach telling her the 26-mile marathon was too long for a “fragile woman.”
  • During the marathon in ‘67, race director Jock Semple chased Switzer down and ripped her bib off of her.
  • Now, after running 39 marathons, 70-year-old Switzer will run in this year’s Boston Marathon — wearing the same bib number an angry man tried to rip from her 50 years ago. Read more (4/17/17 11:26 AM)
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We’re highlighting these women in honor of Women’s History Month! 

Number 8 is Al-Khatahtbeh, a young Muslim writer from New Jersey, who has been working to ensure that Muslim women’s voices are heard. In 2009, Al-Khatahtbeh founded MuslimGirl.com, a site whose mission is “normalizing the word ‘Muslim’ for both Muslims and non-Muslims alike.” In 2016, Al-Khatahtbeh published her own memoir, Muslim Girl. Read more

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Women’s History Month :
Audrey Hepburn
May 4, 1929 — January 20, 1993
Actress, model, dancer, and humanitarian.

Some of her Accomplishments:
Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF
Academy Award for Best Actress (1954)
Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award (1990)
Presidential Medal of Freedom (1992)
Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award (1992)
BAFTA Lifetime Achievement Award (1992)
John Hersholt Humanitarian Award (1993)

“Nothing is impossible, the word itself says ‘I’m possible’!”

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In November 1889, American journalist Nellie Bly began her record-breaking 72 day trip around the world. She was inspired to take this trip after reading Jules Verne’s 1873 novel, Around the World in Eighty Days. Bly traveled mostly by steamships and railroads with the journey taking her through England, France, Pakistan, and Japan. On January 25, 1890, Bly returned to New Jersey 72 days and 6 hours after her trip began.

Nellie Bly became a media sensation and a board game was created to celebrate her accomplishment. Gamers of 1890 would spin the dial and travel around the board until they reached the end. They would also want to avoid certain squares on the board which saddled them with delays similar to those Bly encountered, such as waiting for a ship to depart. If you look closely at the game board, you can see that a stormy day would take you back 10 days.

Sounds like fun!

Though Phoebe Chapple was recognised as a skilled doctor, the Australian government’s policies precluded her from military service. Undaunted, the Adelaide-born Chapple travelled to Britain in 1917 and joined the Royal Army Medical Corps, becoming one of the first two woman doctors sent to France. During a bombing raid near Abbeville in May 1918, her care for those wounded around her, regardless of personal danger, led to her being awarded the Military Medal – the first woman doctor ever to receive this decoration for bravery.

(Australian War Memorial)

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Tatiana Proskouriakoff (1909-1985) was a Russian-American archaeologist. Originally trained as an architect, she fell in love with Mesoamerica and became a significant contributor to the study Maya history and archaeology.

Proskouriakoff’s ascent into archaeology began when she was recruited as an illustrator for an expedition to the Mayan ruins of Piedas Negras. Over the next few years Proskouriakoff produced a series of reconstructive drawings depicting ancient Mayan cities. Further expeditions and in-the-field drawings allowed her to study the diversity of the architectural styles in Honduras, Mexico, and Guatemala.

Tatiana Proskouriakoff is most famous, however, for her ground-breaking work in deciphering Mayan hieroglyphs.  At this time only dates had been deciphered in Mayan hieroglyphs, but their significance and context were unknown. Using several steles from Piedras Negras, She showed that the inscriptions described historical and biographical items from the lives of the Mayan people and their rulers. She identified the glyph that represented birth. This led to the recognition of birth and death glyphs, the name glyphs of the rulers, parentage information, the capture of enemies, and other aspects of Mayan lives.

Modern scholars credit Proskouriakoff’s tireless, pioneering research in Mayan culture with deciphering age-old Mayan hieroglyphic writing. By the end of her life, she had become one of the premier scholars of Mayan civilization, receiving some of the field’s highest awards, including The Order of the Quetzal, Guatemala’s highest honor.