women's health

TO RAND PAUL, HEATH CARE = SLAVERY

Remember, this is the same a*hole who wants to bring back legal racial segregation where businesses could legally hang a “no blacks allowed” sign.

“PAUL: With regard to the idea of whether you have a right to health care, you have realize what that implies. It’s not an abstraction. I’m a physician. That means you have a right to come to my house and conscript me. It means you believe in slavery. It means that you’re going to enslave not only me, but the janitor at my hospital, the person who cleans my office, the assistants who work in my office, the nurses.

Basically, once you imply a belief in a right to someone’s services — do you have a right to plumbing? Do you have a right to water? Do you have right to food? — you’re basically saying you believe in slavery.

I’m a physician in your community and you say you have a right to health care. You have a right to beat down my door with the police, escort me away and force me to take care of you? That’s ultimately what the right to free health care would be.”

Watch the video here

More D-baggery by Rand Paul:

Rand Paul Would Be The Worst President On Civil Rights Since The 1800s

Rand Paul slams gay rights in unearthed 2013 interview: “I don’t really believe in rights based on your behavior”

Paraguay says a 10-year-old rape victim shouldn’t have an abortion

She’s just 10 years old, but in the eyes of the Paraguayan government she’s old enough to be a mother.

That she is still a child herself and fell pregnant after allegedly being raped by her stepfather are not considered valid reasons for abortion in this fiercely Roman Catholic country.

Nor, apparently, is the fact that her body may be too small to bear a child.

The World Health Organization says child pregnancies are “extremely dangerous,”yet the Paraguayan government believes the girl is in good health.

In any case, they say, it’s too late to intervene.

The 10-year-old’s plight has left people around the world shocked and abhorred.

Read on here…

Sometimes we’re happy to get it. (As in, OMG I just got my period and I’m so glad I’m not pregnant and it’s really time to upgrade my method of birth control right-effing-now.) Other times not so much. (As in, did it have to last my entire vacation?) And nowadays we’re even able to skip it, thanks to birth control.
—  But, no matter how you feel about menstrual cycles, there’s one thing we can all agree on: Having a period has inspired a lot of slang.

Via A Mighty Girl:

Arunachalam Muruganantham, who has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India with his invention of a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, was recently recognized by Time Magazine as one of the world’s 100 Most Influential People in 2014. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. His success, both at providing women with more hygienic options and creating local economic opportunities for women, is generating interest in his machine in many developing countries.

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family.

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected – contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene.

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?”

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention.

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty – everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school.

To watch a TED talk by Muruganantham, visit http://bit.ly/1n594l6 or view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/. To read his profile in Time’s 100 Influential People, visit http://ti.me/1hrm6AJ.

1. I’m pro-abortion because being able to delay and limit childbearing is fundamental to female empowerment and equality. 

A woman who lacks the means to manage her fertility lacks the means to manage her life. Any plans, dreams, aspirations, responsibilities or commitments–no matter how important–have a great big contingency clause built: “until or unless I get pregnant, in which case all bets are off.”

2. I’m pro-abortion because well-timed pregnancies give children a healthier start in life. 

We now have ample evidence that babies do best when women are able to space their pregnancies and get both pre-natal and pre-conception care. The specific nutrients we ingest in the weeks before we get pregnant can have a lifelong effect on the wellbeing of our offspring. Rapid repeat pregnancies increase the risk of low birthweight babies and other complications. Wanted babies are more likely to get their toes kissed, to be welcomed into families that are financially and emotionally ready to receive them, to get preventive medical care during childhood and the kinds of loving engagement that helps young brains to develop.

3. I’m pro-abortion because I take motherhood seriously. 

Most female bodies can incubate a baby, and thanks to antibiotics, cesareans and anti-hemorrhage drugs, most of us are able to survive pushing a baby out into the world. But parenting is a lot of work, and doing it well takes twenty dedicated years of focus, attention, patience, persistence, social support, mental health, money, and a whole lot more. This is the biggest, most life-transforming thing most of us will ever do. The idea that women should simply go with it when they find themselves pregnant after a one-night-stand, or a rape, or a broken condom completely trivialized motherhood.

4. I’m pro-abortion because intentional childbearing helps couples, families and communities to get out of poverty. 

Decades of research in countries ranging from the U.S. to Bangladesh show that reproductive policy is economic policy. It is no coincidence that the American middle class rose along with the ability of couples to plan their families, starting at the beginning of the last century. Having two or three kids instead of eight or ten was critical to prospering in the modern industrial economy. Early unsought childbearing nukes economic opportunity and contributes to multi-generational poverty. Today in the U.S., unsought pregnancy and childbearing is declining for everyone but the poorest families and communities, contributing to what some call a growing “caste system” in America. Strong, determined girls and women sometimes beat the odds, but their stories inspire us precisely because they are the exception to the rule. 

5. I’m pro-abortion because reproduction is a highly imperfect process. 

Genetic recombination is a complicated progression with flaws and false starts at every step along the way. To compensate, in every known species including humans, reproduction operates as a big funnel. Many more eggs and sperm are produced than will ever meet; more combine into embryos than will ever implant; more implant than will grow into babies; and more babies are born than will grow up to have babies of their own. This systematic culling makes God or nature the world’s biggest abortion provider: Nature’s way of producing healthy kids essentially requires every woman to have an abortion mill built into her own body.

Read the full article.

“The large number of recently enacted abortion restrictions has dramatically reshaped the landscape for women seeking an abortion. In 2000, 13 states had four or five types of abortion restrictions in effect and so were considered hostile to abortion rights. In that year, no state had more than five types of abortion restrictions in effect. By 2010, 22 states were considered hostile to abortion rights; five of these had six or more restrictions, enough to be considered extremely hostile to abortion rights. By 2014, 27 states had enough restrictions to be considered hostile; 18 of these can now be considered extremely hostile. The entire South is now considered hostile to abortion rights, and much of the South, along with much of the Midwest, is extremely hostile to abortion rights.

Source: Guttmacher

In India, Dying To Go: Why Access To Toilets Is A Women’s Rights Issue

In May, two young women in rural India left their modest homes in the middle of the night to relieve themselves outside. Like millions in India, their homes had no bathrooms. The next morning, their bodies were found hanging from a mango tree. They had been attacked, gang-raped and strung up by their own scarves. Eighteen months after a gang-rape on a Delhi bus, this incident and others since have galvanized nationwide protests to end violence against women and highlighted caste-related discrimination. The tragic story also underscores the need to talk about another taboo topic: open defecation.

Access to clean, safe and private toilets is a women’s issue. An estimated 2.5 billion people globally lack access to proper sanitation, with the largest number living in India. Women are disproportionately affected by lack of adequate sanitation. Many poor women living in rural villages or urban slums wait until nightfall, reducing their food and drink intake so as to minimize the need for elimination. Girls often do not attend school if there are no private toilets, and this is especially true after the onset of menstruation. Approximately 2,200 children die every day as a result of diarrheal diseases linked to poor sanitation and hygiene, which impacts women as mothers and caregivers. Finally, waiting until nighttime to urinate or defecate is not only dehumanizing, it makes women vulnerable to sexual assault, as vividly illustrated by the appalling events in India.

(More from Cognoscenti: Thinking that Matters-90.9 WBUR)

Body hair is NOT an indication of how much of a man you are. Can you hear yourselves?? Girls and women grow hair EVERYWHERE! On their stomachs, their chins, their upper lips, their boobs, their toes, their chest, their thighs, STOP MAKING GIRLS FEEL BAD FOR THEIR NATURAL BODIES

It is perfectly natural to have hair on your chest, on your butt, on your face, on your back, don’t worry about it!! You are not any less of a girl or woman, you are not any less of a normal girl or woman! 
I remember being so ashamed of my dark hair that seemed to grow everywhere and being afraid that I was abnormal because nobody seemed to acknowledge that body hair was a NORMAL, NATURAL thing for girls to have. Please tell your daughters, your sisters, your nieces that body hair (and I mean ALL body hair) is not disgusting or weird or unnatural.

youtube

“Mothers, we owe everything to them. They gave birth to us. They nurtured us. They made us who we are. And this Mother’s Day, we have just one thing to say to all the mothers out there: ‘Get the f— back to work!’”

Incredible segment by John Oliver on how poorly the U.S. treats mothers. Funny but painful, this situation is BEYOND messed up!

Besides Papua New Guinea we are THE ONLY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD THAT DOESN’T HAVE PAID MATERNITY LEAVE.

The whole segment is great but you HAVE to watch the commercial / PSA - the lead in starts at 10:00. 

Click the play button above to watch

White House Cracks Down On Birth Control Mandate

In response to reports that insurers were violating the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) free birth control coverage rule, the White House has warned insurance companies that they must provide all forms of approved contraceptives to users at no cost or co-pay charge. The National Women’s Law Center and the Kaiser Family Foundation recently drew attention to the issue by publishing separate investigations that revealed not all insurance companies are following the law. Now the Obama administration is reiterating that insurance plans have to cover all forms of birth control approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).