women's auxiliary air force

“Specially chosen airwomen are being trained for police duties in the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF). They have to be quick-witted, intelligent and observant woman of the world - They attend an intensive course at the highly sufficient RAF police school - where their training runs parallel with that of the men. Keeping a man "in his place” - A WAAF member demonstrates self-defense on January 15, 1942.“

(AP)

Noor Inayat Khan

James Bond. But a Girl. And Muslim.

1. Her code name was Madeleine (or Nora Baker or Jeanne-Marie Rennier) and she was an enemy of the Reich

2. She was a British secret agent of Indian and American origin (can I get a woot woot for diversity?)

3. As an SOE agent, she became the first female radio operator to be sent from Britain into occupied France to aid the French Resistance

4. But before WWII broke out, she studied child psychology at the Sorbonne and music at the Paris Conservatory under Nadia Boulanger, composing for harp and piano. She began a career writing poetry and children’s stories, and became a regular contributor to children’s magazines and French radio.

5. She wrote Twenty Jataka Tales, inspired by the Jataka tales of Buddhist tradition.

6.  After joining the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, she was recruited to join F (France) Section of the Special Operations Executive. 

7. She was betrayed to the Germans, either by Henri Déricourt or by Renée Garry, and then arrested and interrogated. There is no evidence of her being tortured, but her interrogation lasted over a month. During that time, she attempted escape twice. Hans Kieffer, the former head of the SD in Paris, testified after the war that she did not give the Gestapo a single piece of information, but lied consistently.

8. On November 25, 1943, Inayat Khan escaped from the SD Headquarters, along with fellow SOE Agents, but was captured in the vicinity. She was shackled at hands and feet for ten months and was classified as “highly dangerous.”

9. On September 11, 1944, Inayat Khan and three other SOE agents were moved to the Dachau Concentration Camp and executed 2 days later. Her last words were recorded to be, “Liberté”

Rivetra week, Day 7- Broken

“Once I prayed that there would be reincarnation so I could see you again. And I hoped that we would never meet in a broken world again. But I also begged of heaven that even if we were destined to meet in a broken world again, please still allow me to be by your side until my last breath and my last heartbeat. I would never let you fight alone.”


This is actually a WW2 AU. Levi is wearing the battledress of RAF (Royal Air Force) of Britain, and Petra wears the uniform of WAAF (Women’s Auxiliary Air Force). I don’t really know why I pictured them as British but maybe just because I liked the uniform and it also got wings on it. Also I am really illiterate about the rank thing so sorry for any mistake, but one thing is for sure that the wings on Levi’s chest show that he is a pilot. 


Please do not re-upload or use without permission. Thank you;)

Happy Rivetra week!

Corporal Elspeth Henderson and Sergeant Helen Turner (1941). Dame Laura Knight (English, 1877-1970).

Celebrates two young women in the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force who were awarded the Military Medal for Bravery in recognition of the way they had stayed at their posts after their building received a direct hit. And while Knight has given all due attention to their uniforms, their equipment, and even to a map on the wall behind them, it is their determination and commitment that catches one’s attention.

Specially chosen airwomen are being trained for police duties in the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF). They have to be quick-witted, intelligent and observant woman of the world - They attend an intensive course at the highly sufficient RAF police school - where their training runs parallel with that of the men. Keeping a man “in his place” - A WAAF member demonstrates self-defense. (January, 1942)

Secrecy was the key word during our training. Even my family didn’t know where I was or what I was doing. We weren’t allowed to tell anyone. To find something out during the war you had to belong to that particular department, but even then you were not completely in the know. Even the army didn’t realize that we were civilians in uniform. During training I was given a uniform and the rank of second lieutenant [in the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force]. Right, I thought, I am a second lieutenant. In fact, it was only an honorary commission. It was a sort of military cover that, it was hoped, would give some protection if we were captured, but in fact I was still a civilian. To become an officer in England during the war, you had to spend at least six months in the ranks. Time was too short for the agents to actually become part of the military.
— 

Pearl Witherington, quoted in Code Name Pauline: Memoirs of a World War II Special Agent, ed. Kathryn J. Atwood.

Witherington served as a Special Operations Executive agent with F Section, Stationer network. She parachuted into France in September 1943.