Jessica Care Moore (b. 1971) is a poet, playwright, and performance artist, who in 1997 founded her own publishing company entitled Moore Black Press, dedicated to promoting a new generation of African American authors.

In 2004 she introduced the Black WOMEN Rock! Exhibition, showcasing some of the best musicians in the country. The foundation that bears her name focuses on promoting literacy and expression through art.
Chinese sci-fi writer beats Stephen King for top fiction prize
Hao Jingfang wins Hugo award with dark story of social inequality and injustice in Beijing

“A futuristic tale of urban life in Beijing has won a Chinese novelist a top international prize for science fiction, beating out heavyweight Stephen King for the honour.

Hao Jingfang, 32, won the Hugo Award for best novelette with Folding Beijing, a year after another Chinese writer, Liu Cixin, won the best novel prize for The Three-Body Problem, Xinhua reported on the weekend.

Receiving her award in Kansas City, Missouri, Hao said she was not surprised she had won but had also been prepared to lose.

“In Folding Beijing, I have raised a possibility for the future and how we face the challenges of automated production, technological advances, unemployment and economic stagnation,” she said.

Hao said her book offered a solution to those challenges, but she hoped the situations she described would not become reality.

Hao is from Tianjin, and graduated with a physics degree from Tsinghua University in 2006.

The Hugo Awards, established in 1953, are regarded as the highest honour in science fiction and fantasy. They are named after Hugo Gernsback who was the founder of the American science fiction magazineAmazing Stories.”

Read the full piece here

Congratulations Hao Jingfang!

A man once asked me … how I managed in my books to write such natural conversation between men when they were by themselves. Was I, by any chance, a member of a large, mixed family with a lot of male friends? I replied that, on the contrary, I was an only child and had practically never seen or spoken to any men of my own age till I was about twenty-five. “Well,” said the man, “I shouldn’t have expected a woman (meaning me) to have been able to make it so convincing.” I replied that I had coped with this difficult problem by making my men talk, as far as possible, like ordinary human beings. This aspect of the matter seemed to surprise the other speaker; he said no more, but took it away to chew it over. One of these days it may quite likely occur to him that women, as well as men, when left to themselves, talk very much like human beings also.

Dorothy L. Sayers, Are Women Human?: Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

Book Geek Quote #445

There is something about poverty that smells like death. Dead dreams dropping off the heart like leaves in a dry season and rotting around the feet; impulses smothered too long in the fetid air of underground caves. The soul lives in a sickly air. People can be slave-ships in shoes.
—  Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography (New York:  HarperCollins, 1996), 87. (Originally published 1942)

Marvel has announced at San Diego Comic Con, that they will have their first black female comic book writer… ever!

Roxane Gay is currently writing a collection of Short Stories called Difficult Women, and has written several novels, including one called An Untamed State that will have a movie adaptation released in 2017. Regardless of the projects on her plate, she asserted that she could not turn down the opportunity to work on this book. She stated:

“The opportunity to write black women and queer black women into the Marvel universe, there’s no saying no to that.”

Gay will be teaming up with Ta-Nehisi Coates for a separate story in Marvel’s current Black Panther run.

This is huge and deeply important for crafting Radical Black Imaginations for youth as well as adults. Representation always matters. Shout out to Marvel for taking steps to diversify their staff as well as their heros. 

I realized that I was African when I came to the United States. Whenever Africa came up in my college classes, everyone turned to me. It didn’t matter whether the subject was Namibia or Egypt; I was expected to know, to explain.

In this,
the moment allowed to my loneliness,
Oregon becomes a pregnant hollow,
a swelling brood of

What more do you want from my empty heart, love?

All the longing I do is for a dead man.

I open my mouth
and his hands fall out.

There’s something very important about films about black women and girls being made by black women. It’s a different perspective. It is a reflection as opposed to an interpretation, and I think we get a lot of interpretations about the lives of women that are not coming from women.
—  Ava DuVernay, Writer/Director/Producer of “I Will Follow” and “Middle of Nowhere”