women islam

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Excellent talk. Education is the key.

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‘My Hijab Has Nothing To Do With Oppression. It’s A Feminist Statement’

Not all Muslim women cover their bodies. Not all Muslim women who do are forced to do so. Like freelance writer Hanna Yusuf, who chooses to wear a hijab in a daily act of feminism. In a new video for The Guardian, Yusuf challenges stereotypes by setting out to reclaim the choice to wear a hijab as “a feminist statement.”

For more on on how the hijab helps women reclaim their bodies watch the full video here.

Dear Muslim women, 

. You do not have to explain yourself

. You do not have to put up with Islamophobes- you tell them to fuck off 

. You shouldn’t have to defend yourself 

. You can be a feminist, LGBTQIA+ and anything else you want to be

. You have a nationality, a culture, an ethnicity-you are an individual and have your own unique identity 

. You don’t owe anyone any explanations- they can go do the research themselves

. The social and political issues of another country that is not your own have absolutely NOTHING to do with you- you shouldn’t be forced to feel the weight of their problems  

. You shouldn’t have to feel any guilt, apologise or feel pressured to take responsibility because some other Muslim committed a crime (even the ones who falsely claim to do it for religion) 

. You should be able to feel proud of your religion 

. You have the right to practice your religion 

. You have the right to be safe 


Muslim women are not punching bags for bigots. 

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Muslim woman makes impassioned statement in House of Commons

A Muslim woman, Srosh Hassana, taking part in the Daughters of the Vote event on Parliament Hill, addresses islamophobia and xenophobia in an an emotional statement in the House of Commons on International Women’s Day.

European Union court rules employers can ban Islamic headscarves in the workplace

  • A European Union court ruling on Tuesday is giving employers the green light to ban visible religious symbols in the workplace, including Islamic headscarves.
  • According to the Guardian, the ruling stipulates that in order to enforce such a policy, workplaces must have a blanket ban on religious symbols officially on the books — employers can’t simply tell an employee to remove their hijab, for example. Read more (3/14/17 7:21 AM)

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Noor Inayat Khan

James Bond. But a Girl. And Muslim.

1. Her code name was Madeleine (or Nora Baker or Jeanne-Marie Rennier) and she was an enemy of the Reich

2. She was a British secret agent of Indian and American origin (can I get a woot woot for diversity?)

3. As an SOE agent, she became the first female radio operator to be sent from Britain into occupied France to aid the French Resistance

4. But before WWII broke out, she studied child psychology at the Sorbonne and music at the Paris Conservatory under Nadia Boulanger, composing for harp and piano. She began a career writing poetry and children’s stories, and became a regular contributor to children’s magazines and French radio.

5. She wrote Twenty Jataka Tales, inspired by the Jataka tales of Buddhist tradition.

6.  After joining the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, she was recruited to join F (France) Section of the Special Operations Executive. 

7. She was betrayed to the Germans, either by Henri Déricourt or by Renée Garry, and then arrested and interrogated. There is no evidence of her being tortured, but her interrogation lasted over a month. During that time, she attempted escape twice. Hans Kieffer, the former head of the SD in Paris, testified after the war that she did not give the Gestapo a single piece of information, but lied consistently.

8. On November 25, 1943, Inayat Khan escaped from the SD Headquarters, along with fellow SOE Agents, but was captured in the vicinity. She was shackled at hands and feet for ten months and was classified as “highly dangerous.”

9. On September 11, 1944, Inayat Khan and three other SOE agents were moved to the Dachau Concentration Camp and executed 2 days later. Her last words were recorded to be, “Liberté”

SAVE DINA ALI

Dina Ali is a woman from KSA who fled the country despite strict travelling laws placed on women. She fled Saudi Arabia in hopes to have refuge in Australia away from her abusive family. However, upon landing in the Philippines, Dina was detained by airport officials who prevented her from travelling any further despite her desperately explaining to officials that her family will kill her the moment she returns to Saudi. PLEASE HELP SAVE DINA ALI BY SPREADING MORE AWARENESS. SHE MATTERS TOO.


There are millions of Saudi Arabian women who face injustice and oppression in their own country by the very people who are meant to protect them. The government and their families.

Women in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia cannot travel even outside their own homes without a male guardian. Women in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are barred from driving leaving them very dependent on male relatives. Among other basic human rights violations.

In July 2011, a woman from Jeddah was sentenced to ten lashes by whip for driving a car although the sentence was eventually overturned. Women are even being controlled at their workplaces, a woman’s work must also be deemed suitable for the female physique and mentality. Women are allowed to work only in capacities in which they can serve women exclusively; there must be no contact or interaction with the opposite gender. 
Consequently in 2005, most Saudi women worked as nurses,doctors,teachers and at women’s banks. Jobs such as judges or other jobs in the high public office are forbidden to women.

Even in schools the quality of education is lower for females than males. Curricula and textbooks are updated less frequently, and teachers tend to be less qualified. At the higher levels, males have better research facilities.

- In 2008 Khamisa Mohammad Sawadi, a 75-year-old woman, was sentenced to 40 lashes and imprisonment for allowing a man to deliver bread to her directly in her home. Sawadi, a non-citizen, was deported

- 2013 was when the Kingdom registered its first female trainee lawyer. It’s first ever female lawyer to be granted an official license from its Ministry of Justice. 2013!!!


- “We all have to live in the borders of the boxes our dads or husbands draw for us.”
-Zahra, 25-year-old Saudi woman, April 7, 2016.

-“It can mess with your head and the way you look at yourself. How do you respect yourself or how [can] your family respect you, if he is your legal guardian”?
-Hayat, 44-year-old former school principal, December 7, 2015.

- In 2013 Saudi women were first allowed to ride bicycles, although only around parks and other “recreational areas”. They must also be dressed in full Islamic body coverings and be accompanied by a male relative.

- In 1991, Saudi women launched a campaign for more rights. 47 women drove illegally through Riyadh, in protest against the ban on driving. Activists presented a petition to King Fahd requesting “basic legal and social rights.” Subsequently, a feminist leader was arrested and tortured. members of the public demanded strict punishment of the women who had driven in protest, and denounced activists as “whores.” The mutaween enforced the dress code more aggressively.

- In 2013 the Saudi government sanctioned sports for girls in private schools.

Despite all of Saudi Arabia’s blatant human rights violations including the indiscriminate bombing of Yemeni civilians and the treatment of women in their own borders, they still get elected to the United Nation’s Human Rights Council.