women in mobile

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With ‘Pokémon Go,’ Niantic created a safe space for black female gamers — and I miss it

Pokémon Go was the first title that I played in years which granted me a somewhat-fearless experience in gaming. It allowed me to cast aside some personal doubts, misgivings and assumptions about myself and other people. Not once was I judged for being an adult playing a “kids game”; there were no snide comments about me being a woman in a space that was occupied mostly by men.

The environment was devoid of racist remarks about me being a black player. The unchangeable aspects of myself — the parts of me that were always a “cause” for disruption in other games — weren’t factors among Pokémon Go players. I was just always a fellow player, to whom ridiculous questions like “Do you want to run 12 blocks and three avenues with me to catch a Dragonite?” would be asked.

During my time playing regularly, the Pokémon-obsessed people of New York — comprised of scores of high school kids, financial analysts, journalists, artists, delivery service guys, somebody’s grandparents (seriously), entrepreneurs and more — became my second family.

At first I felt I might have looked the most out of place, based on the fact that I was one of the few women in the streets playing this game who looked like me. But I quickly came to realize that none of that mattered: Pokémon Go created an unlikely safe space in gaming that didn’t exist for me anywhere else.

I was part of that inaugural force of people that made the mobile game into a movement; I invested inordinate amounts of time (and some money) into being the best there ever was. But I haven’t played the game since March, and I wonder if I should find my way back. Read more (Opinion)

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They forgot that we are Women

They called her a know-it-all. They told her that she was annoying and would never have any friends. They told her she was a mudblood, not worthy to flourish a wand or brew a potion or stand beside the ones they called purebloods. They told her she couldn’t. They forgot that she was persistence, she was strength, that the most important things were friendship and bravery. They forgot that she was Hermione Granger.

They called her crazy. They told her that she would never be anything more than the loony girl who read the quibbler, that crumple-horned snorcacks and nargles were fairytales her father told her to help her get to sleep. They told her that she would never fit in. They forgot that she didn’t want to fit in, that she was secret wisdom and serenity, that they were just as sane as she was. They forgot that she was Luna Lovegood.

They called her small. They told her that she was overshadowed by her brothers, that she was a slut who dated too many boys and who loved the Boy Who Lived because he brought her recognition. They forgot that she didn’t need a boy to bring her recognition, that quidditch and power and rebellion and the bat-bogey hex flowed in her veins. They forgot that anything was possible if you’ve got enough nerve. They forgot that she was Ginny Weasley.

They called her needy. They told her she was clingy and useless and that she needed a boy to define her. They forgot that she truly loved him, she just didn’t know how to show it. They forgot that even though she was afraid, she fought and died for her friends. They forgot that she was Lavender Brown.

They called her self-absorbed. They tpld her she had no right to be in Gryffindor, that she was a sucker for attention from professors like Trelawney, that Harry Potter had only taken her to the Yule Ball because he had no one else to take. They forgot that she was intelligence and small doses of courage and a true friend. They forgot that she was the prettiest girl in her year. They forgot that she was Parvati Patil.

They called her shallow. They told  her that she was gorgeous only on the outside, that she was stuck-up and patronizing. They forgot that she would die for the ones she loved, that looks meant nothing to her, that she was as much a fairy princess as they were. They forgot that she was Fleur Delacour.

They called her weak. They told her to get over her tears, that she would be happy again if she only tried, that she wouldn’t survive a storm. They forgot that she was the storm, that she was hidden strength, that her fury was as strong as her sorrow. They forgot that even if they had the emotional range of a teaspoon, she didn’t. They forgot that she was Cho Chang.

They called us many names

but they forgot that we are W O M E N

I love Tumblr feminism but it is so damn West-centric. 

I realise, I realise perfectly, that women get raped and murdered and tortured in the West too. And I am in NO WAY undermining any of that. But feminism is such a complex issue and I’ve come to realise that feminism for one woman is not feminism for the other. 

For one woman, feminism is the right to wear the tightest, shortest clothes and not be degraded or attacked for it. For another woman, it is literally the right to be born. No feminism is more or less “valid”. Please don’t misunderstand me. I’m not saying that your rights are any less important. But feminism is so layered, and I find that–at least on tumblr–much of feminism’s other sides aren’t talked about as much. 

I can only speak reliably for women of my own country. 

It is honestly dangerous for me to be out of the house, alone, after a certain time of night. It’s risky for me to get wet in the rain because I’d look “sexy” and therefore I’m “asking for it”. In the burning heat of summer, I have to think twice about wearing anything short or sleeveless or in any way comfortable, because it would be “indecent” of me. It’s dangerous for me to wear a skirt, or a dress, unless I’m moving from a car to an indoor area, I’m cat-called on my way to college when I’m literally just wearing a pair of jeans and a t-shirt, it’s dangerous for me to enter a taxi alone because I’m at the driver’s mercy, it’s dangerous for me to turn a man down because I could literally HAVE ACID THROWN ON MY FACE, and when I talk about issues like rape, powerful men in powerful offices in the country literally try to blame anything else but the rapist, including (and this is what an actual politician said), “spicy chinese food that gives men fire”. In my country it’s illegal for pregnant women to do a sex determination procedure because most people, when finding out that the unborn child is female, abort her. Doctors take bribes and do the test anyway. Aborted female foetuses are often fed to stray dogs or thrown into sewers. Female babies that are born are often murdered. There are places where local village councils don’t allow women to own mobile phones because it would give them too much freedom. Women are pulled out of school–children!–and young college students, to get married, because a woman’s only job is to give birth to a boy, and why not start right after her body is able to carry a baby, right? Martial rape isn’t against the crime, because some lawyers and judges literally can’t wrap their head around the fact that married women can be raped by their husbands.  Lesbians–they’re not even allowed the freedom to have sex. (Section 377). Trans women, are of course, not even considered human beings. 

And as bad as the women in my country have it, I realise that I am, in fact constitutionally, granted SO much more freedom than women of other countries. The law gives me the right to wear what I want, go where I please, drive a car, be alone. The law gives me freedom, even if my society does not. As a cis, straight woman, I am not considered an abomination against nature. And therefore when I read about the lives of women in countries worse of than mine, I am reminded that I am, in fact, endlessly privileged. My nationality grants me equal status with a man, my parents–progressive and feminist as they are–give me freedoms that even some of my friends don’t have (such as the freedom to choose the man I marry), my education and financial status give me the freedom to dream of what I can be in the future. I am lucky.

Feminism for women in my country is when a girl’s father tells me, “I’m going to educate my daughter like a boy, I want her to become a government servant.” I don’t think, how dare he choose a profession for his daughter, she has the right to choose! I think, wow, he’s giving her an education. 

Feminism for a woman in my country is when I tell my Australian cousin that, “it’s actually getting MUCH better. Child marriage has reduced.”

Feminism is when I have to explain to a New Zealander that, my father doesn’t force me to do anything. He doesn’t dictate the clothes I wear or where I go, or who I meet. I listen to him because I love and respect his judgement, and I know that when he looks at the crop top I’m wearing and asks, in badly-hidden surprise, “You’re wearing that?” it’s not because he has a problem with me showing skin, it’s because he’s terrified of me getting raped or killed. And when I talk about boys with my mother, it’s not because she’s forcing me to get married at the age of 18 to a man of her choosing, it’s because I have a crush and I want someone to talk to. That is more than what I can say for over 50% of my friends. 

No “version” of feminism is inherently more valid than the other. But Western feminism tends to discuss issues like equal pay and sexualisation in media, which are literally so far out of the issues women from less liberated societies face. And I believe that those women deserved to be acknowledged as well. 

Feminism should be about all women, of all backgrounds, otherwise we might as well not bother. 

Süt veren sızılar bunlar. Nasıl ki bir ineği sağar benim köylüm benim halkım . Sen de halk ol bana köy ol bana . Sağ benim bereketimi . Avuçla avuçla sık benim bereket tasan bedenimi. Coşkun şelalerimi akıt boşalt kendine. Kendine aş - ekmek yap.
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Mavi Kül Tablası

Lana Del Rey - Grazia (France) - July 2017

A rough translation of the Grazia interview, which was originally translated in French so a few things might have been lost in the process.

Interviewer: When did you start working on this new album [Lust For Life]?

Lana Del Rey: The day I finished the last one, Honeymoon. It must have been in August, two years ago. I was happy I had recorded an album which has more rock vibes, Ultraviolence, and then one with more blues, one which is sadder, Honeymoon. I felt like I needed to go back to the 60’s and the 70’s, with more pop inclinations. I thought about the Shangri-Las, their harmonies, their playful spirit. Then, after achieving the three quarters of the record, I also felt like doing something more folk, deeper in my heart. I had Joni Mitchell’s Court and Spark in mind. Eventually, I listened to a lot of the Beatles and that’s why I asked Sean Lennon (Yoko and John Lennon’s only son) to sing with me. This is why this album, unlike the others, had more shifts and switches.

Int: You change perspective, points of view?

LDR: Exactly. I grow up with my records, I feel a shift inside and I try to do a chronicle of it. Earlier today, I was listening to one of my tracks, Beautiful People, and words like “blood” or “planet” struck me: I had never used them before. I feel like I’m seeing things with more distance, without completely detaching myself from it. I’m happy about that.

Int: You talk about Joni Mitchell. What do you borrow from her?

LDR: Her way of telling stories. How she expresses her inwardness and the dialogues she has with herself. I like the fact that she was a painter but she couldn’t help but become a musician. And then, I love the region of Laurel Canyon. With my friends, Jonathan Wilson and Father John Misty, we established a true musical community, sort of like the one Joni and her friends had.

Int: Honeymoon was a bit cathartic. It ended with a cover of Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood, like the full stop of something. Was there a new beginning after it?

LDR: I liked the idea of doing a Nina Simone cover and more specifically this song and its message; I often hoped not to be misunderstood, while not knowing what to do to avoid it. This last year, I realized that people judge me for the wrong reasons. They prejudge me a lot. It took me seven years to learn how to deal with it. There were frustrating moments, obviously, especially after the first album. Afterwards, it didn’t really matter anymore.

Int: Do you feel lonely? Have you ever felt the need to be guided?

LDR: I have, I didn’t know what it was like to be guided. But during the past two years in LA, I met a lot of good musicians, I felt a sort of familiarity (camaraderie) with them. Suddenly, I had more people around me, people to call, to tell about what I had just done and ask them how their week went as well. I don’t put things in front of the mirror anymore. Half of the songs have something light in them, they’re less reflective and less about the way I see myself. I didn’t really address a particular audience in the previous records. But this year, I wanted to change my point of view, to speak to others, to a younger generation. That’s what must happen when you grow older…

Int: Do you observe the others more?

LDR: I’m more settled in reality. I go out, I blend more with the others. After having been too intellectual, too existentialist… Although, compared to my friends, I’m the most quiet. I don’t have to make myself heard excessively anymore.

Int: Tomorrow Never Came recalls the Beatles. We hear you sing with Sean Lennon. How did you get the idea?

LDR: I sang the chorus to my producer and he added a few chords. I thought about T. Rex, and I was looking for something more relaxed, more live. It led me to a melody resembling the Beatles. I asked someone to get me Sean Lennon’s number; I wanted to have his voice with mine. We facetimed, and it worked right away between us. He was very encouraging.

Int: The song seems to reflect on a rough time, which is behind you now though…

LDR: Yes, absolutely. Without being able to say what it is, though. That’s why I didn’t want to sing it alone. Aesthetically, I wanted this title to have a 60’s sound, completely, without any modern mediation. It really mattered to me because it fully fit in with me, and I wanted to express it that way, directly.

Int: One track, God Bless America, is about the USA. It is political and in relation to the election of Donald Trump. How do this era and politics influence you?

LDR: The song is about America and the women in it. In the studio, where I go every day, I have conversations about the country with my producer and my sound engineers… And it all just sort of came out. I didn’t feel like I had to say something but it would have been weird if I hadn’t. That was my feeling. It was also about me going out more, listening and talking about it. One thing that always came up with my friends was whether or not it was time to move to Paris! It was our favorite brunch conversation after the election. I especially felt the tremor, the fact that American women were mobilizing against everything that was said.

Int: We can see you’re freer in this album, not quite the tormented lover anymore.

LDR: In the previous albums, I felt split into two parts, torn. Then, I took position, chose easier ways, not to be confronted to difficult experiences anymore. I decided to have more friends, more fun.

Int: What sparked that decision?

LDR: All my previous bad experiences came back to me all of a sudden. And I had enough. I decided to change. And there wasn’t a thing this year I wasn’t certain about. It’s new for me. Something in my personal life changed and it led to a musical shift. And it was for the best, in the right artistic direction. To be in a relationship, it’s very energizing at first. But when the end comes near, only the negative energy remains… And I don’t want to go through that again. In this particular case, if I had known before that it would be this way, I would have run right away. I lived the same thing too many times, even with friends and professional relationships: from now on, I’ll never let anyone surreptitiously take control of who I am anymore. I’ll run at the first sign a relationship can become this bad. That said, sometimes, you have to go and reach the end of things, you have to be able to finish a record, a love affair…


Int: Did you ever have to fight for your integrity?

LDR: To take the right decisions, yes, but never to be the person I am. That was established from the start. When I wrote Video Games, I had to be strong and assured, I sang very directly. Now, I feel different. Back then, that’s what made me happy because that’s all I knew. But it wasn’t enough.

Int: Do you still have some tutelary figures?

LDR: I was lucky to read Bob Dylan, to understand his process and his way of doing things. I don’t know why I’m so obsessed with him… He’s my hero. And I want to clarify, I am in no way putting myself at his level. He’s all the way up there for me. Like Kurt Cobain, despite his sad passing: his way of capturing melodies which seem to come out of the air around you… It’s the ultimate cool.

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anonymous asked:

PLEASE stop posting the white devil emma Watson. PLEASE. I will pay u. I will give u my first born child. Watson has made men a priority in feminism and rewards men for doing the bare minimum. Which is insulting to every gender. She's got some REAL messed up stuff going on.

Look, I’m all for calling out White Feminism at every turn, and I have, but SJblur nitpicking on every white feminist they see and when you start calling them the White Devil coz you don’t fully agree with or misunderstand them, you already lost the argument. She didn’t kill nobody, nor advocated violence on anyone, so take it down several notches. 

first of, she’s a UN Goodwill Ambassador for UN Women. Her main job is to use her popularity to give speeches actual experts and professionals on gender equality wrote for her, because if these experts give the same speech, no one will pay attention; but if she does, people will. Same thing that other celebrities do who are tapped to be UN Ambassadors: Angelina Jolie on refugees, George Clooney on South Sudan, Leonardo di Caprio on Climate Change, etc. 

No celebrity chosen as UN Goodwill Ambassador are chosen for their expertise in the field, they are chosen because when they speak people pay attention. Those truly invested in the cause will sit on meetings or go on the field when they’re not making a movie, but their role as spokeperson remains. Their words are not their words, most of the time they are basically the executive summaries of UN reports. 

Emma Watson’s UN speech was criticized as feminism 101, and it was, but to expect she gives a graduate seminar on feminism with her limited speaking time is imo ludicrous. She’s paid very well but that’s still above her pay grade. The main purpose of her speech was to get attention from the public, generate political will from lawmakers, and fundraise a shit ton of money for the cause. 

And via the HeForShe Campaign, she was able to do that very successfully. She got powerful men from President Barack Obama to the President of Seira Leonne to not just make a commitment to gender equality but have their governments actually invest in gender equality programs in their own countries and/or give more foreign aid to women’s empowerment programs.

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woah... a masterlist

these suck but what can ya do.
requests are open, make as many as you want here 


One Shots/AU’s:

  1. Horan’s Home for Teens
  2. A Trophy Father’s Trophy Son 

Requested:

  1. niall & y/n are arguing and their child gets scared
  2. niall taking his daughter (to the first day of) school 
  3. “niall explaining to his little girl that his bedroom isnt haunted despite the moaning she hears at night lmfaooo”
  4. “where Niall and you spend a lot of the time there with his nephew and he loves & later tells you that he wants to try for a baby & finds out you don’t need to try anymore”
  5. “a day on holiday with niall?” 
  6. finding and reading nialls leather book 
  7. one where one is drunk and thinks the other is the fairy godmother and rambles on about the princess?
  8. going to a space museum with niall 
  9. “i know it’s 3 in the morning but i cant find the cat” 
  10. “where you use a safety word” 
  11.  scratching nialls car by accident 
  12. “is that my shirt?” 
  13. “ignore me i didnt see anything” 
  14. “go on i dare you” 
  15. wedding fluff 

Blurbs & Drabbles: 

  1. finding niall sitting outside on his guitar
  2. giving niall tummy kisses 
  3. cuddling niall when he comes home from hiatus 
  4. the little popsicle bandit 
  5. sweet & slow & sleepy (nsfw!!)
  6. bandaging niall’s blister 
  7. what do you mean your name isnt “dad” ?? 
  8. another one where you use a safe word (nsfw)
  9. best of wives and best of women

Olicity: Return to Me

normalisjustafairytale said: On the prompt front, 4 n 1 quickie of four times Oliver tried to win her back and one time he succeeded. All the fluffy things that make Felicity weak at the knees.

The mug finds itself a home on her desk with a minuscule ‘thud’ that she almost misses beneath the furious hammering of her fingers against the keyboard. They’ve been searching for Darhk so intensely the last few days that she’s not entirely certain she’s slept in the last forty-eight hours, which would be far easier to work out if she’d paid attention to the time they actually started this insane manhunt. Now, all she knows is that she’s exhausted, that she can’t remember the last time she went to the bathroom, and that she’s not entirely certain if that smell is coming from her or not.

But she knows that she’s under-caffeinated and thirsty as hell, so the acknowledgement of the mug at her side comes at the same moment the delicious aroma of coffee sends a wash of relaxation through her, however temporarily. 

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upon rewatch i have come to the conclusion that wendy and lucy (2008) dir. kelly reichardt is an underrated masterpiece that not only showcases the heartbreaking story of a woman and her dog but also explores themes like the difficulty of mobility for women, the patriarchal societal norms that subordinate women from upward mobility, and the crippling amount of safety women are allotted in public spaces