women farming

At 87, Dolores Huerta is a living civil rights icon. She has spent most of her life as a political activist, fighting for better working conditions for farmworkers and the rights of the downtrodden, a firm believer in the power of political organizing to effect change.

And yet, her role in the farmworkers movement has long been overshadowed by that of Cesar Chavez, her longtime collaborator and co-founder of what became the United Farm Workers of America union. That’s true even when it comes to credit for coining the movement’s famous slogan, Sí se puede — Spanish for “Yes, we can” — which inspired President Obama’s own campaign battle cry and has often wrongly been attributed to Chavez. (Obama acknowledged Huerta as the source of that phrase when he awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012. She talks about its origins below.)

Dolores, a new documentary from director Peter Bratt, aims to finally set the record straight.

Dolores Huerta: The Civil Rights Icon Who Showed Farmworkers ‘Sí Se Puede’

Photo: George Ballis//George Ballis/Take Stock/The Image Work

#100Days100Women Day 85: Mama Tingo was a Dominican farmer and land rights activist. She bravely stood against the plunder of peasant lands in the Dominican Republic and was widely respected, especially by fellow rural women. In 1975 MamaTingo was assassinated by a man hired by the man who was trying to dispossess the peasants of their land (this despite attempting to defend herself with a machete). However, her work still lead to over 300 farmers retaining the rights to her land. Today she is considered a martyr and heroine of the rights or poor & rural Dominicans.

molagbalsdeep  asked:

Africa is so beautiful. Where would you recommend to someone who wants to visit for the first time? (Every country looks gorgeous, but which are the most welcoming?)

It depends on what you’re looking for during your visit/ what you’re into. Of course the most popular countries (South Africa, Ghana, Nigeria, Morocco, Kenya & Egypt) attract the most people but I think there are alot of hidden gems in many other countries worth exploring as well. 

Here are a few…

Lake Rebta  (Senegal)


Lake Retba or Lac Rose lies north east of Senegal’s capital Dakar. The water in Senegal’s Lake Retba always seems to have a pinkish hue to it. The lake’s unusual appearance is caused by a salt-loving green micro alga called Dunaliella Salina that resides in the lake, known for its high concentration of the mineral. The color is particularly visible during the dry summer months when the saline levels are high and you will see it turn strawberry pink and sometimes, even red. 


The Devil’s Pool (Zambia)

Devil’s Pool is adjacent to the famous Livingstone Island situated on the edge of the Victoria Falls. Guests can choose to enjoy an exhilarating swim to the edge of the falls during their Livingstone Island visit. The Devil’s Pool is usually open between mid August and mid January - depending on Zambezi water levels.

Marrakech, Morocco 

The city is divided into two distinct parts: the Medina, the historical city, and the new modern district called Gueliz or Ville Nouvelle. The Medina is full of intertwining narrow passageways and local shops full of character. In contrast, Gueliz plays host to modern restaurants, fast food chains and big brand stores.


Virunga Mountains (Rwanda, Congo (DRC) & Uganda)

Nearly half of the world’s 700-some remaining mountain gorillas live in the Virunga Mountains of central Africa, at the intersection of Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The volcanic slopes here are lush with tropical forests and diverse mammal, bird, and reptile species. Tours are available to see the volcanos and gorillas (but please take note & high consideration…if you’re sick….don’t go on the gorilla tours, for their sake ( they’re endangered), even if it’s a small fever).

Zanzibar (Tanzania)

In Zanzibar to ancient Persia and tales of Shirazi merchants that inspired Sinbad the Sailor, to the court of Swahili princes and Omani sultans, to India, with its heavily laden scents.

For over 2000 years the monsoon winds have shaped the landscape and culture of these islands. Stone Town’s Indo-Arabian architecture provides an amazing urban backdrop. Clove farms creep up the hillsides and farmers load crates of mangoes onto outbound boats. And, along the coast, village life remains steeped in tradition as fishing dhows set sail on high tides and women farm seaweed off powder-white coral sand. With its tropical tableau and unique culture, the archipelago offers the quintessential Indian Ocean experience.

Loango National Park (Gabon)

Many nature lovers well acquainted with the African continent consider Gabon a rare and exotic tropical gem. Wildlife rich forests cover 70% of Gabon’s landmass, its vast picturesque coastline is predominantly wild and unspoiled, and its inland and coastal waters teem with myriad species of fish, reptiles and marine mammals. In Loango National park you can spot various animals from hippos to whales!

Ouidah (Benin)

Some 42km west of Cotonou is Ouidah, a relaxed, relatively prosperous town and a must-see for anyone interested in voodoo or Benin’s history of slavery. From the 17th to the late 19th century, captured countrymen from across West Africa left Ouidah for the Americas.