women aviators

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ADDIS ABABA—Ethiopian Airlines is dispatching its first-ever flight operated by an all-female crew. The flight was scheduled to depart for Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday night. The airline says it wants to promote women’s empowerment and encourage more African girls to pursue aviation careers.

Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde Gebremariam said attracting more women to aviation jobs is one of the reasons for hosting the female flight, together with empowering women.

“It’s going to be very inspiring for all the women all over the world, aviation women and particularly the African woman. Because, as you know, here in the continent of Africa, we are lagging behind in women empowerment. So this is going to inspire all the school girls in Africa that they have a very bright future in the 21st century,” Gebremariam said.

The flight is being handled by women in every aspect – from planning, to aircraft maintenance, and from the pilots to air traffic controllers. Even upon arrival in Bangkok, all customs and immigration officers will be female.

Ethiopian Airlines says about one third of its employees are women. But the number is smaller when it comes to positions such as pilots and technicians.

Bessie Coleman by John de la Vega 

Bessie Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926)  was the first black woman to earn a pilot’s license. Because flying schools in the United States denied her entry, she taught herself French and moved to France, earning her license from France’s well-known Caudron Brother’s School of Aviation in just seven months. Coleman specialized in stunt flying and parachuting, earning a living barnstorming and performing aerial tricks. She remains a pioneer of women in the field of aviation.

Jacqueline Cochran (1906-1980) was a central figure in the field of American aviation. She was instrumental in the creation of the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps, and the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during WWII.

She began flying lessons in the 1930s, and by 1938 was considered the best female pilot in the United States. She set more records in distance, speed, and altitude than any other pilot in history. She was a volunteer for the Royal Air Force, and helped recruit more women pilots.

i want a ww2 film about women ..idfc if its “just” german nurses baring the hell of medic camps with not a single weapon but a sharpnel and have to avoid disgusting soviet rapists and continue their duty as nurses. i dont care if its “just” about detroit working american women in an assembly line dealing with the harsh conditions of work and the pressure that the war depends on them, i want to see female russian soldiers amidst male russian soldiers fighting. i want to see okinawans and chinese women have to survive and fight tooth and nail under the pressure and chase of imperial japanese murderers. korean sex workers who had to endure the brutality of japanese field officers.

 women who take role of their brothers, husbands or just male friends as nurses / armed forces so their male buddies are sent into combat when nobody else is going to take the role BUT women. women taking in aviation efforts because nobody else but women can at the moment, women taking as much u.s employment service–because its required for them to work extra hard at home to get a tomato and can of beans on the table–and that’s without ration tickets.

 i’d love to see a film of women having to survive at the u.s home front because that’s all they have at the moment and are unable to join any of the army branches.

you may die like men in war or you survive like women. 

Marie Marvingt (1875-1963) was a French sportswoman with remarkable achievements in a number of fields, such as aviation, mountaineering, and athletics. During World War I, she was the first woman to fly missions during conflict, and was the first certified Flight Nurse in the world.

Between 1903 and 1910 she became the first woman to climb most of the peaks in the French and Swiss Alps, and in 1905 she was the first to swim the entire length of the Seine through Paris. In 1910 she was rewarded by the French Academy of Sports with a gold medal for “all sports”, the only multi-sport medal ever awarded.