women athlete

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Serena won her first Grand Slam at 17. She’s part of the only pair to win a Career Doubles Golden Slam.

She was the 5th woman to hold all four Grand Slam singles titles simultaneously.

She was the only player in history to win three Grand Slam singles titles by beating top two ranked players.

She has the most hardcourt grand slam singles titles. She’s the oldest player to hold all four Grand Slam singles titles.

She’s the first player ever to win 80+ matches at 3 of the 4 grand slam events. Has “Roger” done that?

Serena greatest athlete ever! Definitely no one close in tennis.

washingtonpost.com
U.S. women’s soccer wins higher pay, improved support with five-year labor deal
The U.S. women’s soccer players’ union and the sport’s governing body have agreed to a five-year collective bargaining agreement, improving standards for the national team and pro league and ensuring labor harmony through the next World Cup and Olympics.
By https://www.facebook.com/SoccerInsider

“In a joint statement, the U.S. Women’s National Team Players Association and U.S. Soccer Federation said they have “ratified a new collective bargaining agreement which will continue to build the women’s program in the U.S., grow the game of soccer worldwide and improve the professional lives of players on and off the field. We are proud of the hard work and commitment to thoughtful dialogue reflected through this process, and look forward to strengthening our partnership moving forward.”

In recent years, the players have raised issues about compensation and working conditions compared to their male counterparts, casting a shadow over the efforts of the most successful women’s team in soccer history and pitting the federation against wildly popular athletes, such as Carli Lloyd and Alex Morgan.

In March 2016, the players  filed a federal complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, charging the USSF with wage discrimination. The case remains active.

Financial specifics were not immediately available, but people with knowledge of the pact said it includes:

  • Increase in direct compensation
  • Increase in bonus compensation
  • Enhanced benefits related to travel and hotels
  • Per diem equal to the U.S. men’s team
  • Greater financial support for players who are pregnant
  • Financial support for players adopting a child

Also, in a key gain, the players’ association will now control group likeness rights for licensing and nonexclusive rights in sponsorship categories where USSF does not have an agreement.”  

Read the full piece here

GOOOOAAAAAALLLLLLL!!!!!

See the full gifset here

More posts on women’s soccer

Solo: A Memoir of Hope, by Hope Solo

When Nobody Was Watching: My Hard-Fought Journey to the Top of the Soccer World by Carli LLoyd

The audiobooks for Solo: A Memoir of Hope and When Nobody Was Watching: My Hard-Fought Journey to the Top of the Soccer World are both available as free downloads via an Audible.com promotion! More info on the promotion, plus a huge list of available feminist books here.

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“WHEN MOTIVATION MEETS DETERMINATION… IT CAN BE A STRETCH AT TIMES.” -Vivian Brown

#NeverGiveUp

When women make progress in arenas typically identified as exclusively male, sexual representations are used to establish cultural boundaries that reproduce male supremacy (Birrell & McDonald, 2000; Robinson, 2002). It is no accident that Danica Patrick’s success in Formula One racing was coupled with a semi nude photo shoot in Sports Illustrated’s hallowed (soft porn) “swimsuit edition” in 2008. This strategy for preserving male supremacy is borne out in a recent study (Kane, 2008) on the effect of sexist marketing strategies for women’s sports. Kane found that the use of sexual objectification as a marketing tool, rather than building a greater fan base and greater interest in women’s sports, actually undermines the female/pro-female (parents of girls, for example) fan base of women’s sports while failing to generate a male fan base.
—  Ann Travers, “The Sport Nexus and Gender Injustice” in Studies in Social Justice 2 (2008): 79–101, p.84