women act

Anyone else ever wish Facebook had a ‘Fuck Off’ button? Some of my (female) friends have taken to following some dreadful page which tells women how they should act in order to ‘catch’ a man & reposting that shit in their feeds. I’m sorry, but you shouldn’t have to be anyone other than yourself in order for someone to love you.

If you’re that desperate to ‘catch’ a man, try leaving a case of beer under a large crate marked ‘Acme’, propped up with a stick tied to a string. Wait for the man to approach & pull the stick away, thus successfully catching said man. You’re welcome.

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In news coverage of the GOP health care bill, outlets should be asking how in the hell they justify premium hikes for survivors of rape, sexual assault, and domestic violence – all considered pre-existing conditions under the AHCA.

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Our last women’s history month post this month is also in honor of Transgender Day of Visibility on the voice actress Maddie Blaustein. Maddie was a major voice actor and creator in various industries, and if you grew up with anime, you’ve probably heard her voice at one time or another. Maddie was a transgender woman who worked for several companies.

Maddie was born in October 1960 in Long Island, New York. She was the second-oldest of five siblings, and was Jewish. She was born intersex and began transitioning later on in her life. She was a fairly well-known activist for transgender rights within the community. She has been credited with other names in work, including Madeline Blaustein and Kendra Bancroft

Maddie was perhaps most well known for her work as a voiceover actress, primarily in anime. She worked for family dubbing company 4kids, which was a New York-based company that dubbed anime for saturday morning cartoons. Perhaps her most famous role was that of the talking pokemon Meowth in the famous franchise, a role she carried for several seasons. She also portrayed Pokemon characters Lt. Surge and Bill, along with many minor characters. Other famous roles that she took on include that of Solomon Mutou (Yugi’s grandfather) in the anime Yu-Gi-Oh! and  Chef Kawasaki in the english dub of the anime Kirby: Right Back at Ya!

She voiced a large number of characters in her lifetime, one of her most recent roles being that of Satorious in Yugioh GX. She was arguably one of 4kids’ more famous voice actors, having at least one role in almost all of their properties. Some of the other 4Kids dubs she had a role in include Ultimate Muscle, One Piece, and Cubix. She acted in other things as well, including the characters Li Zhuzhen and Colonel Hyuga in the game Shadow Hearts. She also portrayed characters in Samurai Deeper Kyo and Slayers Try.In the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, she played the robot Omega in several games as well as the president in Shadow the Hedgehog

Maddie did often work outside of animation. She wrote and did art for several comics, including Static, Power Pachyderms, and Hardware. She was an active content developer for the game Second Life under the name Kendra Bancroft, and gained a good reputation for her skills as a 3D modeler. She was also the creative director for the Weekly World News for a time. Her brother Jeremy Blaustein is a translator and video game localizer. 

Maddie passed away in late 2008 from an untreated stomach virus. Memorials poured in from fans who grew up with her work all over the internet.

Her work in anime, comics, and voice acting is not forgotten and lives on with the people who grew up listening to her work. Her impact on the anime industry in the west has been felt by many, and her dedication to excellence as an artist and a person is not forgotten. 

What the House Vote to Repeal Obamacare Means for Planned Parenthood

Congress Is a Step Closer to Repealing the Affordable Care Act and ‘Defunding’ Planned Parenthood. Here’s What the Bill Actually Does, and How to Fight Back.

On May 4, the U.S. House voted to pass the worst bill for women’s health in a generation: the American Health Care Act (AHCA). This bill not only seeks to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but also to “defund” Planned Parenthood by blocking Medicaid patients from care at its health centers. 

As the bill heads to the Senate, here’s what it actually does — and what it doesn’t do.

What Thursday’s Vote Did NOT Do

  • It didn’t become law.
    The ACA repeal bill passed the House by a narrow margin, and now it faces an uphill battle in the Senate. We can expect more changes to the bill that will impact women’s health.
  • It didn’t close Planned Parenthood.
    All Planned Parenthood health centers are open as usual, and staff are doing what they’ve always done: getting up in the morning; opening the health center doors; and providing high-quality, affordable health care to all people who need it. That includes patients who rely on Medicaid coverage.
  • It didn’t cancel your insurance.
    The benefits of the ACA are still here for you, even if you’re 26 or younger and on your parents’ plan. In fact, the majority of people can still purchase a plan for $75 or less. If you have health care coverage, it is still in effect until there is an actual change in the law, which takes time. So, make your medical appointments, and get the care you deserve and are entitled to under the law.

What the AHCA Threatens to Do to Women’s Health

In particular, the AHCA would:

  • Take away health coverage for 24 million people

  • “Defund” Planned Parenthood by blocking people who rely on Medicaid from accessing preventive care at its health centers — including birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment

  • Reduce access to no-cost preventive services, including birth control

  • End protections that keep insurers from charging people with pre-existing conditions unaffordable rates — allowing insurance companies to once again charge people tens of thousands of dollars a month because they had cancer

  • Impose a nationwide ban on private insurance coverage of abortion

  • Undermine Essential Health Benefits — including maternity coverage and prescription drugs, which disproportionately affect women.

  • Gut the Medicaid program, which approximately 1 in 4 women of reproductive age rely on to access no-cost, critical reproductive health care (such as birth control, lifesaving cancer screenings, and maternity care)

4 Ways to Fight Back Now

Infuriated? You’re not alone. Here are the top three ways to stand up for health care and stand with Planned Parenthood right now.

#1: Call Your Senators
This is the most important way to take action right now. Use our easy online form to call your U.S. senators. We’ll give you a script so you can tell them to protect health care and stand with Planned Parenthood.

#2: Tag Your Senators on Facebook
Do you notice when somebody tags you on Facebook? Chances are,  your answer is “yes” — and that goes for your senators, too. Our simple form automatically tags your senators and gives you time to edit the post.

#3: Tweet at Your Senators
If you have Twitter, take a moment to tweet at your senators. Our easy-to-use form automatically finds your senators’ handles. It also gives you a sample tweet if you don’t want to write your own.

#4: Tweet at Reps who Voted Against Women’s Health
Click on the link above and scroll own for our list of representatives who voted in favor of this dangerous bill. If you see your House member, tell them you will not forget that they stripped access to care — and will not forgive.


in light of the recent, disturbing trends i’ve seen growing on tumblr and elsewhere lately, i’d like to clarify a few things about butchness as an identity, a concept, and a subject worthy of respect.

butch is a lesbian identity historically defined by aspects of presentation, behavior, and self-perception. it has its roots (at least in america) around world war ii, where thousands of women took on stereotypically masculine jobs in the women’s army corps, becoming welders, truck drivers, and more confident in breaking from feminine ideals. it emerged as a coherent idea within lesbianism around the forties when the lesbian bar scene took off and saw its heyday in the fifties and sixties, where butches learned from each other how to dress, act, woo femmes, and carry themselves and their brave identities with self-assurance and pride. since then, it has grown and changed alongside lesbian culture and gender perceptions, surfacing a little differently every decade.

butch is an intriguing and gorgeous gem from lesbian history (and lgbt history as a whole). lgbt individuals have forever sought ways to express their desires and identities outside of society’s stringent gender-based norms. masculinity, in particular, has been closely guarded, held holy, and a means of oppression. women who had nothing to do with men whatsoever — women hated by men as a whole — forged their own rules and roles and lifestyles from the ashes of men’s pride, with utter indifference towards that which men held dear.

butch is outside of the common perception of gender. it stands against the idea that gender identity and presentation must be thought of as completely distinct — and also allows that gender identity and presentation be held distinct and at odds with one another. there are butches who affirm themselves completely as women and butchness as an integral part of their womanhood, in opposition with the standards of femininity imposed upon women everywhere. there are butches who identify personally and intimately with the androgyny and gender nonconformity that butch presentation necessitates, and might go by he/his pronouns or have their children call them “dad” without being any less lesbian, any less butch. these are both completely valid and acceptable ways of being butch.

butch is not maleness or male privilege. butches are not men. masculine presentation does not a man make. butch is by necessity lesbian, and lesbianism by its very existence has everything to do with women and nothing to do with men. butch is complex, challenging, and diverse, and requires nuance in consideration and analysis. this is not something to hate. this is not something to fear. it is something to wonder at, to appreciate, to learn from.

butch is not evil. is not ugly, unless a butch would like to reclaim the ugliness that society’s spite has thrust upon her. is not oppressive. is not something to be conflated with maleness, whether cis or trans.

butch is beautiful. is handsome. is brave. is enduring. is revolutionary. is significant, both historically and for today. is magnificent. is admirable. is strong.

butch hatred is not the hatred of men or the hatred of some ridiculous, universally oppressive “masculinity.” butch hatred is hatred directed towards women and, furthermore, lesbians. butch hatred is the hatred of lesbians who have been a significant part of the backbone of lesbian culture as long as lesbian culture has existed. the women hated foremost in the twenties were those who wore pants. the women labeled as “gender inverts” for their posture, confident stance, and preference for “men’s activities” in the late nineteenth century wrote the first books women like them could turn to for stories of women’s love for women, for women not acting the way women ought to. (see the well of loneliness by radclyffe hall.)

butches are not privileged for their butchness. butches are widely disadvantaged and punished for their gender nonconformity. the fact that we live in a day and age where some people — some lesbians, even — are so isolated from actual gender dynamics that they would believe that women can get goodies from society for not acting “like women” is completely, wickedly mind-boggling.

stop with “masculine privilege.” stop with “butch privilege.” stop with “femme oppression,” which is a post for another day. the hatred of butches is frankly inexcusable and deeply shameful. you are better than this, and butches deserve far, far more than the spite and ignorance you show them.

this post is wholly inclusive of trans butches.

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If Obamacare is repealed, women of color will be 2 in 3 women who could lose coverage

follow @the-movemnt

another effect of infantilizing trans men is that you’re (probably 100% unintentionally) pushing them into feeling forced into performing toxic masculinity so they don’t appear weak, so they aren’t compared to children or puppies, so they’re not just ‘soft cute sweet adorable pure bundles of fluff’

it pushes people into thinking the only way they’ll be accepted as another guy is to uphold rigid stereotypes of masculinity and become rough and imposing so they’ll be considered anything but a soft and vulnerable smol baby

and (this is at least what i’ve seen many trans women say from their experiences & their posts) constantly using language of brutal submission to trans women and forcing acts of violence onto their character without taking into account who they are as people ‘step on me/beat me up!!!/goddess who could kill me and i would be happy’ can push an even harsher pressure on performing femininity for them when society is already forcing that

being trans isn’t about conforming harshly and at the will of others to gender roles in order to be respected with language that’s not dehumanizing or infantilizing or fetishizing, it’s just about wanting to be respected and to be able to live happily how we feel comfortable presenting ourselves and who we are. there are so many things i want to do, that i want to wear and enjoy, but language like this terrifies me into not trying things out, into being what people want me to be and want to see me as based on stereotypes  than what i want for myself just so that i’ll have my basic humanity respected and it should not be that way

anonymous asked:

Before you defend males being witches I think you need to step back and realize why people are hesitant about involving males in witchcraft. Historically males were the ones burning and murdering females for witchcraft. It's no coincidence why women are more strongly associated with life/death, magic, etc. It's not transphobic to say this and that men deserve no acceptance in something women were persecuted (and in some areas still are). Women own witchcraft.

I’m sorry if you thought you’d be informing me of something I had no clue of,  but earnestly this whole “Women own witchcraft” is the very most idiotic, Euro centric argument I have ever heard in Witch Discourse.

You need to get off your racist, sexist high horse right this instant.

I’ve done research and experienced witchcraft in my own culture and have knowledge of the witch hunts of the 1600s. It’s not a case of “The evil males murdering women!!!” It was a case of both women and men who used their religion to murder people horrifically and senselessly out of ignorance and fear. Both genders were the perpetrators and victims, both genders were the victims. Some women are more in tune to their spirituality and open to witchcraft due to the way western culture has brought women and men act. In other cultures, men are more likely to be spiritual leaders, or it may be perfectly egalitarian. 

Saying that women own witchcraft because men in their culture fucked shit up for witches is essentially saying that atheists and pagans alone own witchcraft because Christians fucked shit up for witches. 

Saying that women own witchcraft is like saying that poc own witchcraft because of imperialism’s damage to poc’s culture. 

Saying that women own witchcraft is like saying that only people born to witch families own witchcraft.

Inherently, all people, males included, have the same amount of spiritual potential and energy. The way some people’s witchcraft works is recognizing that we are all witches, we are all beings with energies and spirituality and we choose to develop and partake in our own. Blocking off half the population for crimes they did not commit is disgusting.

Not to mention how GODDAMN RACIST THIS IS!

I come from Miami, and in Miami I’ve experienced a lot of the Santeria culture. Here, people mostly talk about it when there’s dead chickens washing up on shores after sacrifices or when dead animals are dropped off in bags at the courthouse, and I’m going to assume that you think witchcraft is revamped spells from the 1600s where animal bones are cutely replaced with some other herb followed by crystals sitting on the shelf.

However..

Santería is a culture of witches. Santería is very valid witchcraft, it is sometimes bloody and not cute and not adapted to Western Culture but that is the goddamn point. There are males that practice witchcraft in this culture, in fact leaders of all genders.

Native Indigenous culture have had Shamanism and related spiritualistic religions, there are so many tribes where witchcraft comes in the forms of women, men and non binary people such as the complex Two Spirit identity doing rituals, sacrifices, meditations… witchcraft is the practice of magick, and guess who practices magick?

These babies! See the things in grey! Those are called non western civilizations! Theses are places where thousands of individual communities exist, all with their own religions and native cultures! And most of them have all practiced some form of magick! Both men and women and non binary people!

If you’re a crystal witch, male or female or nonbinary Shamans probably made or sold you your crystals. Your lore could be from a Jewish Rabbi, of Jewish Mysticism. Or the Muslim intertwining of pagan and occultism. Or it could be the literal God Of Witchcraft, Thoth, in Egyptian culture. It could be an Alchemist, such as Gilles de Rais or Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, all males murdered for their practicing witchcraft. The masks and skulls bought may very well be from Ghana tribes that were used as Talismans, or certain artifacts and rituals may come from Benin, West African tribes and communities. 

You do not, never have, never will own witchcraft. No one ever will. And if you think men should be excluded, then only female, magick inherited African tribes victim to imperialism should own witchcraft.

Thank you for reading, and fuck Euro Centric supremacy.

vanityfair.com
CBS Comedy *Mom* Is Trading Emmy Campaigning for Activism
By Laura Bradley

As Emmy nominations draw near, one network comedy has made the almost unheard of decision not to campaign—not because it doesn’t stand a chance, but because it can think of something more useful to do with its money. Mom earned two back-to-back supporting actress wins for one of its central stars, Allison Janney—in 2014 and 2015. (She was nominated in 2016, but lost out to Saturday Night Live’s Kate McKinnon.) But this year, rather than throw down cash for yet another campaign for gold statuettes, CBS will donate the budgeted funds to Planned Parenthood.

As the Republicans continue to work toward pushing through their replacement for the Affordable Care Act, Janney and Mom co-creator/executive producer Chuck Lorre have decided to raise awareness around the threats that specifically target Planned Parenthood, Variety reports. (The version of the American Health Care Act that passed in the House includes a provision that would slash funding for the organization.) They’ll appear on CBS This Morning as part of their special Mom campaign, encouraging their fans to donate to the organization. (Vanity Fair has reached out to Janney, her co-star Anna Faris, and Lorre for comment, and will update this post accordingly.)

Although the move to forego campaigning is extremely rare, such decisions could become more mainstream over the next few years. As Variety notes, United Talent Agency canceled its 2017 Oscars party in protest of Donald Trump, choosing instead to donate $250,000 to the A.C.L.U. and the humanitarian organization International Rescue Committee.