woman surrealist

“Light’s Cradle”

Latest piece! Perhaps it’s Mother Nature in the fleeting moments before she met Father Time. Perhaps it’s something else. I’ve been working on this so hard that if I stare at it any longer I’ll go insane, so you guys get to stare at it now instead.

Prints here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/488695852/lights-cradle-by-maxwell-crabill-ltd

Instagram and such things in the side bar :)

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Remedios Varo Uranga (December 16, 1908 – October 8, 1963) was a Spanish-Mexican, para-surrealist painter and anarchist. She was born María de los Remedios Alicia Rodriga Varo y Uranga in Anglès, a small town in the province of Girona, Spain in 1908. In 1924 she studied at the Academia de San Fernando de Madrid. During the Spanish Civil War she fled to Paris where she was greatly influenced by the surrealist movement. She met her second husband (the first was the painter Gerardo Lizarraga, whom, as was discovered after her death, she never divorced), the French surrealist poet Benjamin Péret in Barcelona. There she was a member of the art group Logicophobiste. They were introduced through a mutual friendship with the Surrealist artist Oscar Dominguez.

Due to her Republican ties, her 1937 move to Paris with Péret ensured that she would never be able to return to Franco’s Spain. She was forced into exile from Paris during the Nazi occupation of France and moved to Mexico City at the end of 1941. She initially considered Mexico a temporary haven, but would remain in Latin America for the rest of her life.

In Mexico, she met native artists such as Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, but her strongest ties were to other exiles and expatriates, notably the English painter Leonora Carrington and the French pilot and adventurer, Jean Nicolle. Her third, and last, important relationship was to Walter Gruen, an Austrian who had endured concentration camps before escaping Europe. Gruen believed fiercely in Varo, and he gave her the support that allowed her to fully concentrate on her painting.

After 1949 Varo developed her mature style, which remains beautifully enigmatic and instantly recognizable. She often worked in oil on masonite panels she prepared herself. Although her colors have the blended resonance of the oil medium, her brushwork often involved many fine strokes of paint laid closely together - a technique more reminiscent of egg tempera. She died at the height of her career from a heart-attack in Mexico City in 1963. (Wikipedia)

The Last Painting of Frida Kahlo

Viva la Vida - “Live Life” is both the title of this artwork and the inscription on it. The reason for Kahlo’s renown in life can be attributed to the subtle detail of symbolism she placed in her works. She accomplished great things through her pain and, while tragic, it makes many people see her paintings and relate to them in more ways than one. A woman who would suffer both physical and emotional afflictions, transformed that into artistic symbolism on a canvas. She created countless paintings of the impacts in her life - such as her disability, to her heritage - right up until her death.

This painting of ripened fruit at its prime is fitting of the inscription placed upon it. Painted so shortly before she passed at the age of 47. She hoped (in her own words) that “the exit is joyful, and I hope never to return.”

Above: Viva la Vida, 1954, by Frida Kahlo (1907-1954)