wolves with human hands

Criminal

Pairing: Jungkook x Reader
◊ Summary: As a rogue werewolf, you knew the dangers of trespassing into a pack’s territory, but that didn’t stop you.
◊ Genre: smut, werewolf AU
◊ Warnings: sexual content
◊ Word Count: 4,904 


You hadn't planned on getting caught. You had hoped for the exact opposite, actually.

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anonymous asked:

how do you feel about wolves as pets?

A lot of people think that as long as you’re treating and training it fine and/or you get it as a pup, it will act like any other normal dog. But wolves can’t be domesticated. Sure, they can be raised and trained to some extend, but they are still wild animals and they will live their pet lives miserably and trapped. Even as you get it as a pup that was born in captivity, it will always be wild, unreliable and uncontrollable and definitely won’t act like a normal dog. Wolves will stay what they are; wild. People can’t control them. By taking a wolf as a pet, the owners will harm themselves, the wolf, and other animals and humans in their environment. Dogs have genetically adapted to a life with humans, wolves have not.

A fun way to show how the ‘wild’ part in wolves can never be tamed by humans; in experiments they compared dogs raised with minimal human contact and wolves hand-raised by humans. The dogs still understood human body language better than the wolves did. 

When we try to tame mother nature, she often turns against us. In my opinion it is plain selfish to keep a wolf as a pet. I often hear people want a pet wolf because they love wolves so much. Doing so is in nó way showing your love for that animal – not even when you suggest doing the whole “I’ll give it a big enclosure with trees and a lake and other wolves and treat it perfectly fine”-crap. If you love wolves and want to treat them well; leave them be, show your love for them by letting them be wild and help protecting this species by donating money to wolf recovery programs, volunteering at wolf centers, and if you feel the need to have something that looks like a wolf; there are lots of domestic pure dog breeds that look like wolves.

anonymous asked:

een wolf als huisdier is niet atlijd slecht. sommige wolven hebben een gelukkig leven bij iemand en kunnen zijn zoals ze willen zijn. oordeel niet altijd te snel alsjeblieft.

(Translation message: “A wolf as a pet isn’t always wrong. Some wolves live a happy pet life at someone, and can be who/asthey want to be. Don’t always judge too quickly, please.”)

A pet wolf ís always wrong. It’s not a matter of “judging too quickly”, it’s a matter of wolves not being pets. It’s unethical and abusive to keep a pet wolf. Wolves are wild animals. They can only be tamed to some extent, but being tamed doesn’t equal being happy.

Wildlife biologists, wolf scientists, etc. oppose the idea of pet wolves, because they know for a fact it’s wrong. The wolf is not living a happy life. It can not be who, or as they want to be.

Wolves need ridiculous amounts of space, are incredibly smart animals who need constant mental stimuli, and are extremely social animals who heavily rely on their social bonds with their pack members and should to be alone. You can not provide wolves these things when keeping them as pets, and therefore they will not be able to live a happy pet life.

Saying a pet wolf “can be who/as they want to be” is ignorant. In the most “positive” situation imaginable (you get a captive born wolf as a pup, manage to tame it to the extent of that even being possible, and for some miraculous reason it’s not destroying everything you love), it might lóók like they’re living a happy life to some people, but they are definitely not.

On average, a gray wolf’s territory is about 100 square miles, up to 1,000 square miles or more in places like Alaska and Canada. Do you really believe they can truly be happy in the cage that is a house+backyard? That’s like letting a human live their entire freaking life in a stair closet. I’m not even exaggerating.

Without enough space and mental stimuli, a wolf will most likely develop mental and/or behavioral problems. Aggression, destructiveness, apathy, depression, etc. This will most likely cause harm to themselves, their environment, their owners, and other animals and humans in their environment. You have no idea how many abandoned and abuses wolves which people kept as pets rescue centers have to deal with. Once you have an animal and decide to give it up, you typically sentence that animal to death. There are virtually no good homes for second-hand animals. There may be bad ones, though. [x]

Many people actually believe that with plenty of love and attention, they can turn a wolf into a dog. Wolves can’t be domesticated. They can be “raised”, “trained”, or “tamed” to some extent, but they will always remain wild animals who will live their pet lives miserably. Even as you get it as a pup that was born in captivity, it will always be wild, unreliable and uncontrollable and definitely won’t act like a normal dog.

I understand (understanding =/= agreeing) people want a pet wolf because they love wolves so much. But taking a pet wolf is in nó way showing your love for that animal. Also, many people naively believe that owning a wolf helps wild wolves because it keeps the genes “alive.” At best, these people accomplish absolutely nothing, as these “pets” can never be used to establish wild wolf populations. At worst, should this “pet” rip off a child’s arm (as one did in Lolo, Montana) or kill livestock or pets, it reinforces age-old fears of the wolf. [x] By having a pet wolf, you are literally loving the wild wolf to death.

If you love wolves and actually care for their well being; show your love for them by letting them be wild and help protecting this species by donating money to wolf recovery programs, volunteering at wolf centers, raise awareness on them, fight for their survival in the wild, preserve their habitat, write letters to government officials urging them to protect natural habitats, learn about wolves (the whole story, not just what you want to hear), and share your information with others. By doing so, you will find that you don’t have to possess wolves for them to become an important part of your life.

If you still keep the egocentric wish to have a wolf in your life, why don’t you take a dog. There are lots of domestic pure dog breeds that look a lot like wolves, and there are so many shelter dogs out there who actually dó need you to take them home.

Dogs have genetically adapted to a life with humans, wolves have not. A fun way to show how the ‘wild’ part in wolves can never be tamed by humans; in experiments they compared dogs raised with minimal human contact and wolves hand-raised by humans. The dogs still understood human body language better than the wolves did.

People often give examples of when they think having pet wolves is ethical, by providing them an as natural life as possible – for example, keeping two or more wolves in a big enclosure. But that doesn’t really count as “pet”. Besides, it’s extremely egocentric when the only reason for locking them up is solely for your own benefit. The reason for having pets should be because you love said animal and you care for their well being. Not solely because said animal can provide you personal satisfaction when you know it’s at the expense of said animals well being.

But what about all the wolf centers you support? They’re keeping wolves in enclosures as well!” Yes, having or allowing a wolf to be born into captivity does not benefit the individual animal. Therefore, the only justifiable reason to have wolves living in captivity is to benefit wild wolves. Captivity may be justified if the captive wolf is maintained in an environment as psychologically and physically humane as possible, and if the animal is rescued, or part of:

  • A well-developed, professional exhibit that furthers public understanding and tolerance for wild wolves
  • A peer-reviewed scientific research project that furthers human understanding of wolf behavior and habitat requirements
  • A government-sanctioned breeding program for the purpose of reestablishing wild wolf populations.[x]