Although this may not come as a surprise, the current battles over reproductive rights in the United States have a deep-rooted history.  Between 1971-1974, 10 Mexican women were coerced and deliberately misinformed into sterilization by medical doctors at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center while undergoing emergency Cesarean deliveries. 

In No Mas Bebés (or No More Babies), an hour-long PBS documentary that debuted this week, award-winning director Renee Tajima-Peña and producer Virginia Espino retrace the haunting 1975 legal battle of Madrigral v. Quilligan to tell the victims’ stories.

You can watch the documentary on PBS for free until February 22nd. 

Here’s why you should:

No Mas Bebés is a harrowing and humanizing examination of a case that exemplifies the effects of institutionalized racism and the policing of women’s bodies. 

You can read more about the documentary on BitchMedia.org.

Photo: Carolina Hurtado in the maternity ward of the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, where she was sterilized in the 1970s.

So many people (not everyone, but still) turning on Beyonce after she gave a not-very-safe political opinion sums up the sad state of feminism in 2016, though.

A woman can be hot. She can be entertaining. She can be half-naked. She can dance for you. And men think it is so EMPOWERING~! for women and pat themselves on the back for supporting it.

But the second that woman shows a bit of spirit and tells you something you might not necessarily want to hear?

It’s fucking over. She’s the enemy.

6

Janese Talton-Jackson was killed because she said no

At about 2 a.m. on Jan. 22, Charles McKinney, 41, reportedly approached 29-year-oldJanese Talton-Jackson at a Pittsburgh bar to ask her for a date. Police say Talton-Jackson rejected McKinney’s advances, then left the bar. When she did, McKinney followed her outside, shot her in the chest and fled. Talton-Jackson was pronounced dead at the scene. McKinney was later apprehended after being shot by police and has been charged with homicide. Janese Talton-Jackson’s death is not an anomaly.