wobbler

Wobbler Disease - Cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM)

This infographic gives an overview of this particular company’s treatment for ‘wobbler disease’. The MRIs, supplied by the company, were colorized to highlight the symptoms of the disease and progression of treatment. Comparisons of the healthy and unhealthy postures of a dog suffering from this syndrome are included in this graphic.

Discworld cookery masterpost

New edition ! Recipes from Nanny Ogg’s Cookbook are marked with a *, all the others are creations from talented fans (shout out to @fantasyfeasts, for providing most of these, and @sewuniversebacktogether for attempting to make troll food). Discworld themed food for everyone ! (last update 09/29/17)


Appetizers, snacks, sandwiches

Main dishes

Pizzas

Bakery and sweets

Troll food !

Don’t forget the drinks ! Check Discworld Drinks :

gravity-gravy  asked:

Have you done a breed breakdown of borzois?

I haven’t yet, but let’s change that now, shall we?

Please note the disclaimer. These posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what your animal is going to encounter in their life. 

Originally posted by 10soup

They’re beautiful dogs, and all the borzoi I have met have been very sweet and easy to handle. They do look more or less like a greyhound in a furry coat.

You can find borzoi with injuries similar to the racing injuries we often see with greyhounds, but to a much lesser extent because the modern borzoi is not bred as selectively for racing, and spend less of their time running in the same direction around a circle. They are less likely to have stress injuries because they’re simply not living that lifestyle.

These big dogs are somewhat prone to Wobbler Syndrome (cervical vertebral instability), particularly the rapidly growing males. In this condition vertebrae of the neck are malformed, and intermittently pinch on the spine, causing weakness, wobbliness or paralysis.

Their deep chest makes them prone to Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (aka GDV or bloat) where the stomach twists on itself, essentially cutting off blood supply and outflows to the stomach. Affected dogs require emergency surgery, or they will die.

This breed may also be prone to cardiomyopathies, but I haven’t seen enough to fairly comment on it.

Their deep chests means we sometimes see them with thoracic pathology (lung disease, pleural effusions) that are more extreme than in other breeds. I’m not convinced this is because the dogs are prone to them as such, but more that due to their impressive lung capacity the dogs survive for longer, so the pathology is worse. I’ve drained 6 liters of fluid out of a borzoi’s chest, and it survived.

A lot has been written about flat-faced, brachycephalic dogs. The borzoi is a classic example of the opposite, a dolichocephalic breed. The long face is not nearly as problematic as the flat face. Aside from occasionally being fussy with their plates/bowls and and potential for a maxillary fracture if they crash and land on their nose, the long nose is rarely an issue.

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I’m glad we found our lost kong cause now we got two so both dogs can play at same time 🐶☺️🐶

1. ENGLISH/ 2. БЪЛГАРСКИ (вж. по-долу)/ 3. DEUTSCH (s.u.)/ 4. ESPAÑOL (ver más adelante)

1. The pleasure of fishing.

2. Удоволствието да риболоваш.

3. Freude am Angeln.

4. El placer de pescar.

lillieisabllagrace  asked:

If boxers aren't in line to get evaluated, I'd like to put them there... No hurry. :)

Ah, Boxers. Clowning cancer factories. They’re such an interesting breed and frequent visitors to the vet clinic. They’re also one of the addictive breeds, meaning that despite their flaws there are a lot of people that once they own one, are never without one ever again. You might want to sit down and have a cup of tea.

Disclaimer: These posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what your dog is going to encounter in their life.

Originally posted by orbo-gifs

So, the number one thing that Boxers as a breed are known for in veterinary medicine, if there one one solitary defining feature that was the reason most veterinary professionals decide against owning a boxer, a breed they would otherwise like, then at the risk of being insensitive, (since you like sparkly gifs) its…

Boxers are prone to cancer like no other breed I know, closely followed by Golden Retrievers. They develop all sorts with great ease, at unfortunately young ages with great regularity.

Mast Cell Tumors are the bane of the boxer breed. These tumors can develop anywhere on the body, including in organs like the spleen, and in any layer of the skin. These tumors are sometimes called the Great Pretenders because they can look like lots of different things. They’re easily mistaken for benign lipomas by feel, and can be misdiagnosed if they’re growing under a lipoma by FNA as it’s easy to miss a small lump with a small needle.

While a low grade MCT has a chance to be cured with surgery of detected early, a high grade one is all kinds of trouble even with modern chemotherapy options. It’s fear of these tumors that cause many vets, including myself, to be highly suspicious of every single lump on a boxer or boxer cross.

Boxers also seem highly prone to other cancers too, lymphoma being high on the list. Individuals with a white belly also get squamous cell carcinomas and cutaneous haemangiomas.

They are one of the very few breeds known to develop malignant histiocytomas, which is especially unfortunate considering that in most dogs a histiocytoma goes away all on its own in a few months, but in Boxers it will potentially kill them.

So while any lump on any dog can be a malignant cancer, Boxer’s have the added ‘fun’ of developing lumps that probably would have been fine on an other dog and look benign but sometimes actually aren’t. Can you understand my paranoia?

Boxers are a brachycephalic breed, meaning they have shortened muzzles and flattened faces. There is significant individual variation within this breed, but more extreme individuals do suffer from Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome (BAS)

Their facial conformation leaves their eyes prone to numerous Eye Conditions, including but not limited to cherry eye, entropion, exposure keratopathy and corneal ulcers. They also get a particularly difficult to treat eye ulcer called ‘indolent ulcers’ which are sometimes just called ‘Boxer dog ulcers’. They also get progressive retinal atrophy which is probably more genetic than anything else.

Speaking of diseases that are names after the breed (rarely a good sign), this breed also gets an unusual gastrointestinal disease called Histiocytic Ulcerative Collitis, which is also called Boxer Dog Collitis. For brevity’s sake, think of it a bit like a type of IBD of Chron’s disease.

And while we’re still on the topic of diseases named after this breed, Boxer Cardiomyopathy, which is really a arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy that’s primarily identified in boxers, also afflicts this breed. It’s not their only heart condition though, Dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial-septal defect, subaortic stenosis and sick sinus syndrome also occur.

This is turning into a long post, isn’t it. Do you want a break? How about another gif?

Originally posted by skullvis

Okay, let’s talk some more about Boxers from a veterinary standpoint.

Boxers are prone to a couple of neurological disorders, Wobbler Syndrome is more common in larger males but degenerative myelopathy can occur in any boxer, is they live long enough to get it.

Younger boxers may develop demodex, if they’re juvenile when they do so it’s likely due to a funky immune system, which might explain a lot about this breed. Boxers that are predominantly white may also be deaf in one of both ears. It’s claimed that white boxers are more prone to cancer too, and for skin cancers this is true, but all boxers are prone to cancer. Hence the sparkly gif.

Possibly related to an interesting immune system, the breed is prone to allergies and atopy. This is a day to day annoyance on top of he life threatening/shortening conditions this breed is likely to develop.

Speaking of life threatening, the boxer dog is certainly deep chested enough to develop Gastric Dilatation Volvulus and need a trip to the emergency clinic.

And possibly the least interesting thing on this list the breed is seen relatively frequently for in the veterinary clinic is hip dysplasia.

Gosh, a long list never looks good, especially when three conditions are named after the breed.

Boxer’s also have a reputation for anaesthetic sensitivity. This is often exaggerated in breed circles, assuming the boxer in question doesn’t have one of the aforementioned heart conditions, but because they are brachephalic they have a higher vagal tone and are more sensitive to the common sedative acepromazine.

This doesn’t mean you can’t use acepromazine in boxers, only that you have to be careful with it. I will often use it at a tenth to a quarter the dose in young, nutty individuals before surgery, but some vets wont use it at all.

Can you see how living with one of these dogs would drive me nuts from a medical paranoia standpoint?

theycallmemeow  asked:

If you let a dog play with doggy puzzles to find and uncover treats, will that encourage them to get into cabinets and other things looking for treats? My friend won't let her dog play with such toys because their breeder said then she will get into stuff. The dog's parents also were known to get into things though.

It depends on the dog, but generally, no. Most dogs are not going to generalize from the manipulation of a specific toy like a wobbler or a puzzle toy to manipulating storage spaces or opening doors. They’d be more likely to pick that habit up from either observational learning (human messes with door = door opens = treats) or by accident (bump door = door opens = treats). Once a dog learns that it can get into human storage spaces, it’s harder to discourage, but while puzzle feeders encourage innovate behavior I don’t think there’s likely to be a direct consequence of them learning to raid the pantry. 

If you’ve got a dog that’s starting to try to get into things, make sure there’s nothing in the cabinets that would be reinforcing for your dog to find - move any food or bags or trash or treats into an upper level cupboard. If there’s nothing reinforcing in them and there’s nothing that make investigating them worth doing, the behavior should self-extinguish. If they’re only getting food from manipulating puzzle feeders and not from getting into storage spaces, you shouldn’t see the investigative behavior spread too much to other things. 

wagashihime  asked:

Have you talked about dobermans before? My family got one a year ago, and he's just too adorable, though he needs a lot of constant training and patience to be manageable(especially since he has european lineage, he's very big). But I heard they have some genetic conditions, and end up dying sooner than other big breeds. Hopefully, with good care he'll live a long and healthy life(our rottweiler is 13 yo, and still has all her teeth, and just a bit of cataracts), but I'd still like to know more

The Doberman is one of my special favorite breeds, despite their unfortunate medical concerns. I love their natural ears, I just adore them, and wish more breed enthusiasts would just let the dogs be the way they’re born instead of insisting on cosmetically altering them in such a useless way. 

Before I go into a lot of detail about this special breed, please note the general Disclaimer: These posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what your dog is going to encounter in their life.

Originally posted by jaalalee

How can you not love those ears, just they way they are?

I haven’t met a Doberman yet who hasn’t been special in some way. I’m particularly fond of them in their senior years when this breed finally seems to develop some grasp of dignity. In their youth, these dogs often have a case of no brains or no brakes, causing them to have multiple accidents and misadventures. While crashing into other dogs and inanimate objects may leave a dog with relatively little injuries, the worst offender I had to treat required three major stitch ups, each a month apart. This was a fair effort considering that the dog had been strictly confined for two weeks after each surgery, and included having such adventures as running through a hedge and impaling self on stick. He definitely either had no brakes, or no brains. 

For a breed so energetic and prone to misadventures as pups, it seems ironic that the breed is well known for Von Willebrands Disease, a blood clotting disorder. 

Von Willebrands Disease (VWD) varies in how much of a problem affected dogs present with, and dogs with only one allele will not be as affected as dogs with two. In addition, excitement or splenic contraction can temporatily increase the amount of Von Willebrand factor circulating in the blood. 

Before genetic testing was available, a lecturer of mine defined reference ranges for Von Willebrand factor in Dobermans that were normal, carriers or affected. He’d hoped that by screening dogs, breeders would be able to eliminate carrier dogs from the gene pool, and thus the disease. 

However certain breeders quickly realized that making their dogs excited or forcing them to do strenuous exercise before the blood test would temporarily increase their Von Willebrand factor, and so a carrier of the disease would briefly show normal levels of the factor in the blood. Certain breeders would consistently do this so that their dogs, their lines, remained ‘desirable’ and without fault. 

This was understandably very frustrating from a veterinary standpoint. Here you had a perfectly useful test for identifying carriers for a genetic disease to help breeders make better decisions about breeding these dogs, and people were cheating on it. Fortunately, with the advent of a genetic test, cheating in this way is not effective. 

A second condition the Doberman is very well known for is Wobbler Syndrome, or cervical spondylomyelopathy. This is particularly common in larger males, possibly attributable to the rapid growth rate, causes a weakness in the vertebrae of the neck which compresses the spine. It’s treatable with surgery, if you’ve got a large wad of cash to blow, though some mild cases may attempt conservative treatment. In general the breed seems to have an increased vulnerability for other intervertebral disc disease, which are likely related. 

Demodex mange is yet another classical Doberman disease, particularly juvenile demodecosis in puppies. There’s probably a very interesting immune system deficit in this breed causing this predisposition, but I don’t yet know what it is. In any case, demodex are my favorite parasite. They’re cool little critters that have no anus….

Originally posted by comaniddy

… and I’m always happy to see them because they’re non-infectious. That means they won’t jump onto other dogs, or humans like me. They’re annoying to treat, but they are treatable, though often require a long course of treatment. Fortunately more and more over the counter flea products are also proving effective against demodex, so this may be less of an issue in the future. 

Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is possibly the biggest killer of Dobies, and when they get it, they get it bad. Some surveys suggest that a full third of these dogs succumb to this condition, and the average survival time for Dobermans diagnosed with this condition is only about a third of the time for other breeds. There’s not a clear nutritional link in this breed either, though carnitine and taurine supplementation is unlikely to do any harm. Unfortunately it seems that once it develops, there’s not much we can do about it. We can keep them comfortable for a while, but we will lose that fight. There are genetic tests available for this now, but time will tell how useful they are. I’m hopeful. 

The breed is certainly deep chested enough to be prone to Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV or bloat), especially in younger dogs that insist on running around like lunatics after a big meal, but it has not been as common in my experience as it has been in other breeds. 

And it is worth screening for hip dysplasia, even though only 17-18% of Dobermans seem to have hip dysplasia, despite breeding efforts that number hasn’t improved in the last decade. Personally I’d like to see more uptake of Pennhip screening instead of just the standard view. 

So there are a few conditions bothering the breed. There are also some neuropathies/myopathies that they are diagnosed with, but they may potentially be linked to wobbler syndrome. 

All of that being said, they do grow up into beautiful, dignified older dogs if given the chance. Dobies that have earned their silver muzzles have been some of my favorite patients. 

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Precision Obedience Workshop notes

with “my puppy’s fear period started in it” notes

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powerfulexistance  asked:

Anything you'd suggest someone buy when getting a standard poodle? I hope to at least have a deposit down on a puppy by the end of the year and in the meantime plan on making an amazon wishlist :) I do plan on doing 90% of the grooming. Thank you~

Hi! :D 

Honestly, besides the grooming utensils, all you’ll really need are basic puppy things! Appropriate toys, gear, food, and whatever you rely on to help you train your puppy. What kind of supplies you get will also depend on your puppy, because I know some people have very food/toy/praise motivated puppies, while others like me have pickier ones. I definitely made sure that Pazelle had toys with lots of varying textures. I would suggest getting interactive toys for sure over any other kind of toy, because poodles are second only to Border Collies in intelligence and most will need mental stimulation even as young puppies. Maybe nothing too complicated to start off with, but something like a Kong Wobbler would be good for crate training or just teaching your pup to be by itself. Pazelle is also not a heavy chewer and seems to like cuddling with stuffed animals. 

As for grooming supplies, almost every brush (except for a Furminator) is helpful. Slicker brushes  and combs are especially recommended for poodle grooming. I would also suggest buying a shammy towel to dry a wet coat, and buying both shampoo and conditioner (I personally like and use Buddy Wash’s products). I also keep leave-in shampoo and conditioner/finishing spray and use them on him about once a week. Because poodles have hair they get oily a bit faster than breeds with fur (my parents’ chipoo actually starts to smell like Frito’s when he isn’t bathed often enough and gets really waxy hair), so it’s also helpful to keep some grooming wipes. Pazelle’s ears drape into his water bowl a lot, and in the grass and mud and whatever else, so the hair around his ears gets… crunchy? He also has peed on his legs a few times, so wipes are definitely helpful for that. Depending on how heavily you’re going to groom your puppy, you’re going to need some good grooming scissors and clippers. I bought ConairPRO shears to start off with, as I’ll probably keep Pazelle in a pet/puppy clip until he’s about six months old. My breeder personally swears by Andis’s clippers for thick poodle coats over any other brand (lighter coloured poodles tend to have finer hair than darker colours, so that’s another thing to keep in mind), although I am still deciding which model I am going to get. Any heavy-duty clippers with good reviews should be adequate, though- I’ve personally only ever used a really old red Oster on my old cocker spaniels. There are tons of poodle grooming tutorials up on YouTube, and you can see how the finishes of different clippers look before you purchase. Nail clippers are also important but I’m sure you have all the basic grooming stuff for your current pupper. :D Buying a hemostat, ear powder, and ear cleaning solution (although you could use something natural instead, like white or apple cider vinegar) is probably also a good idea. 

As for sizes, Pazelle wears a small collar and harness (and sweaters! just be aware that leaving clothes on for too long can cause matting) currently, and medium toys are a good size for him. I bought him medium food bowls, which are too big for him right now, but he’ll grow into them. 

I’m super excited to see more poodle pups on here, they’re such a great breed! ^-^ I wish you the best with your future pup, and am looking forward to seeing him/her! I hope I was helpful and not too repetitive, but if you’d like more opinions and suggestions, go make an account on PoodleForum.com, as people there are really friendly, helpful, passionate, and reply pretty quickly! 

lovelytornado  asked:

I found your blog from the everything-wrong-with-horses post, but I've been devouring the dog breed posts. Could you make one about bullmastiffs? I really want one bc my childhood bullmastiff was the sweetest and most loving dog I have ever met, but my bf doesn't like brachycephalic dogs & says a lab would be healthier. Thanks for any insight!

I can certainly talk about them a little bit. While they’re probably not going to live quite as long as a Labrador would, I would hesitate to assume a lab would be healthier because of the muzzle. Bullmastiffs are considered brachycephalic, but they’re on the less extreme side and don’t suffer Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome as often as the more extreme breeds.

But first, please note the disclaimer. These posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what your animal is going to encounter in their life.

Originally posted by jayne-n-pals

While the individuals I’ve encountered of this breed have been nice enough dogs, they’re not overly common down here, especially compared to the Bull Arab, which is an Australian breed that is arguably better suited fr our climate, but there’s a few of them around.

Hip Dysplasia and Elbow Dysplasia are major concerns for this breed, as they are with most large breed dogs. When these joints fail to develop properly, they can lead to persistent and potentially severe lameness from a young age. While many dogs do get surgical treatment, it’s expensive and should be considered when looking at this breed.

Now, I’ve said many times before that I’m not a fan of painful eyes, and the extra skin on these dog’s heads thanks to that bulldog heritage will frequently contribute to Entropion, where the eyelids roll inwards, rubbing eyelashes and fur against the eyeballs. This is painful and requires surgery.

Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome, which is the name we give to the cluster of symptoms associated with having a muzzle that is too short, is present in this breed, but not ubiquitous. Some individuals are better than others, and while it’s hard to tell by looking at a puppy whether it will have an issue or not, puppies with more open nostrils are likely to be less affected.

Cerebellar Abiotrophy is noted in the breed, a degenerative neurological condition which often affects quite young dogs where they become progressively less and less coordinated. It’s relatively rare, but is easy to confuse with Wobbler Syndrome (Cervical vertebral instability), where the vertebrae of the neck occasionally compress the spinal cord, causing weakness to paralysis in the rest of the dog. This condition is more common in large, rapidly growing breeds.

Big, deep chests predispose this breed to Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV), where the stomach twists on itself, cutting off blood supply and the outflow to both the oesophagus and the small intestine. You only have a few hours to get them to surgery, or they will die.

Less dramatically, most of the time they come into the clinic for some sort of skin issue, whether it’s allergies or some sort of infection.

Luckily Edd safely strapped himself in so he wouldn’t go flying.

I will say it again. ALWAYS WEAR YOUR SEAT BELT.

Your seat belt keeps you safe no matter what. If this weren’t a cartoon, well I can’t really say that because Ed, Edd n Eddy has some pretty serious topics at times. As I was saying Eddy would have been seriously injured after being thrown out from the car.

Edd laments about how seat belts really are a trusted friend.

Until they break on you.

I enjoy hitting the pause button for this movie to find the most wacky expressions.

Ed and Eddy are hesitant to see if Edd is alright. He isn’t moving. And he is in an awkward position.

Eddy’s concerned expression is the best. He never wants to show that he cares. Eddy is a very kind person. That’s what I think got him into trouble with Bro. 

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Wobblers Syndrome - Jessie Oldham &  Jessie Oldham

equinesanonymous replied to your photoset “angular limb deformity in a young horse, should be humanely…”

What exactly is the deformity? Like he definitely does not look right but I can’t pinpoint it. Also, what’s windswept?

the hind legs are extremely angled and move sideways, giving the term “windswept.” It can vary in degree, and location, often angular limb deformities develop in the front legs- some example pictures

it is typically only correctable at a very young age, like within a few weeks of life the foal should undergo surgery, and have a farrier to help correct it as well. The one in the original post is a yearling already, probably not fixable or stable and probably moves more like a wobblers horse than anything