wives-&-daughters

This is really cool.

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honour in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional ‘housewife’ role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes referred to as female samurai. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako are famous examples of onna bugeisha. (x)

To my ladies of color.
To my fat ladies.
To my disabled ladies.
To my trans ladies.
To my lesbian, bisexual, and ace ladies.
To my mentally ill ladies.
To my Muslim, Christian, and Buddhist ladies.
To my scientific and political ladies.
To my ladies in poverty.
To my ladies in uniform.
To my single ladies.
To my mothers.
To my sisters.
To my girlfriends.
To my wives.
To my daughters.

To my women, of all shapes, sizes and colors, celebrate yourselves and all your great accomplishments. It is because of you that we thrive. Never let yourself think you are less than you are. Thank you for paving the way forward for those who follow in your proud footsteps.

Happy International Women’s Day.

I’m not gonna go all “wives, mothers, daughters, sisters” on your ass. Don’t do this shit for your mom. Don’t do it for your wife. Do it because you’re not a human scab. Do it because you want people to be better, and because you intend to hold humanity accountable for producing disgusting, petulant man-trolls who think they’re entitled to other people’s time and attention. Do it because you’re gonna stop the cycle of disgusting, petulant man-trolls right flipping now, in your own flipping life.
—  Andrea Grimes, on men stepping up and stopping other men from harassing and threatening women
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Onna-bugeisha

Female women warriors of the Japanese upper class are known as onna-bugeisha (女武芸者). They are members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan who were trained to use weapons to protect their, honor, family, and household from enemies. Many of them were widows, wives, daughters, and even rebel women who engaged in battle beside samurai men. See more at: http://www.kcpwindowonjapan.com/2014/03/heroic-women-of-the-samurai-class/

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“It’s wonderful. It’s developed over time. I think that they’ve opened up a lot of layers and colors to the character that I think makes her more true to form. She’s a woman in a position of authority, what’s exciting about that is that this show is not afraid of showing all the colors of a woman in authority. Sometimes she is that authority figure, sometimes she is an avenging angel, sometimes she’s in love, sometimes she’s a big dork. I think that that’s believable and hopefully something that a lot of people can relate to, whether it’s a person that they see themselves as, or it’s a person that they see in their wives, their daughters, their mothers, and so on.”

Don’t u hate that brown boys act like desi aunties are the worst thing to happen to this world and ur just sitting there thinking bout all the desi uncles you see first hand abuse their wives, stop their daughters from getting an education, blackmail them into marriage, victim blame women who are assaulted, even discourage women from attending mosque and basically benefit from internalised misogyny and misogyny in general.

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

If I am some kind of symbol to some people out there, then clearly I am an example of the lens through which we, as a society, view our mothers, daughters, sisters, wives, female friends and colleagues. The objectification and scrutiny we put women through is absurd and disturbing. The way I am portrayed by the media is simply a reflection of how we see and portray women in general, measured against some warped standard of beauty. Sometimes cultural standards just need a different perspective so we can see them for what they really are — a collective acceptance… a subconscious agreement. We are in charge of our agreement. Little girls everywhere are absorbing our agreement, passive or otherwise. And it begins early. The message that girls are not pretty unless they’re incredibly thin, that they’re not worthy of our attention unless they look like a supermodel or an actress on the cover of a magazine is something we’re all willingly buying into. This conditioning is something girls then carry into womanhood. We use celebrity “news” to perpetuate this dehumanizing view of females, focused solely on one’s physical appearance, which tabloids turn into a sporting event of speculation. Is she pregnant? Is she eating too much? Has she let herself go? Is her marriage on the rocks because the camera detects some physical “imperfection”?

I used to tell myself that tabloids were like comic books, not to be taken seriously, just a soap opera for people to follow when they need a distraction. But I really can’t tell myself that anymore because the reality is the stalking and objectification I’ve experienced first-hand, going on decades now, reflects the warped way we calculate a woman’s worth. This past month in particular has illuminated for me how much we define a woman’s value based on her marital and maternal status. The sheer amount of resources being spent right now by press trying to simply uncover whether or not I am pregnant (for the bajillionth time… but who’s counting) points to the perpetuation of this notion that women are somehow incomplete, unsuccessful, or unhappy if they’re not married with children.

—  Jennifer Aniston, “For the Record”

my mom presses her fingertips to her eyelids,
as though helping them carry the weight
of always having to be patient.
she whispers,
“why was I given such difficult, such picky daughters?”

I don’t know how to tell her
that she is lucky to have daughters who care more about their happiness
than being wives.
daughters who care more about love
than security.
daughters who understand they are not life vests,
(not made to save any man)—
they are the ocean,
immense and deep and lovely,
worthy of drowning in.

— 

I DON’T MEAN TO UPSET YOU, MOM, BUT I THINK I’M ENOUGH, new poetry by Ayah Elbeyali.

READ THE REST ON THE FEM.

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The queen studied the wives, daughters, and mothers who filled the benches. “Of themselves the hens are nothing, but their cocks are important for one reason or another, and some may survive this battle. So it behooves me to give their women my protection. If my wretched dwarf of a brother should somehow manage to prevail, they will return to their husbands and fathers full of tales about how brave I was, how my courage inspired them and lifted their spirits, how I never doubted our victory even for a moment. ♦ Sansa VI, ACOK // Tyrion VIII, ASOS

I love my books: Elizabeth Gaskell. If you like George Eliot, you should definitely check out Elizabeth Gaskell. A contemporary of both Eliot and Dickens, Gaskell likewise wrote about a broad swath of English society, including the working class, the plight of the poor, and labor unrest; her concern about social issues is best demonstrated in Mary Barton and North and South. I consider Wives and Daughters to be quite similar in tone and feel to Middlemarch and very nearly its equal. Cranford, although virtually plotless, is such a charming and gently humorous look at small-town life in mid-19th-century England that it ranks among my all-time fiction favorites.

You hear them before you’re even able to see the building. Angry chants from a crowd of protesters outside Donny’s. It’s been days since the anti-breakfast legislation was passed, rendering breakfast illegal forever, but the crowd continues to grow. These are people who are tired of being told what they can and cannot eat. These are husbands, wives, sons, daughters, uncles and aunts. These are human beings with appetites. People who were once free. It began with the outlawing of dancing. Then bedazzling. The next target was sunscreen over 30 SPF. Now it’s breakfast and the people are not going to take it. Which of course they shouldn’t. Because bacon.