with two minor characters

pfffbfbbbttbtt

someone: do you still ship klance?

me, internally: I love the dynamic of Klance and I love writing the ship. It was my first ship in the Voltron fandom and my first Voltron Klance fic Bonding Time is still my most popular. But it’s a constant frustration, because the more Klance content I reblog, the more anti blogs and art and posts are recommended to me. Because so many Klance fans are antis, and so Klance is associated with antis, which is so sad because I don’t want to be associated with such a toxic side of a fandom and I know many other Klance shippers don’t either, or don’t see the harm in anti arguments because they support Klance, and they’re defending Klance, so it must be okay, right? I hate that so many antis who ship Klance are also Lance stans, because I love Lance but I do not appreciate the iterations of Klance which make Keith out to be little more than a prop to support and lavish love upon Lance when he needs it - forget Keith’s feelings and character development, he’s from Texas and loves knives and making terrible decisions LOL. I hate the “there can only be one” mentality among so many Klance fans, who will go out of their way to bash other ships in order to make Klance the only “safe” and “non-problematic” one. I hate that the argument “because it’s not Klance” has literally been used when one shipper was asked why she didn’t ship or like Hance, I hate that people label Pidge/Lance as problematic even though Pidge and Lance have great potential as a couple and their age difference is the same as Keith and Lance’s, and most of all I hate that antis who ship Klance (…which is most if not all of them) claim other ships that “interfere” with Klance like Sheith or Shance or Shklance are pedophilia and unhealthy, when they are neither. I hate that antis who ship Klance will go so far as to attack other shippers with slews of hate, death threats, give them labels using words they do not even understand, and worst of all invalidate the experiences and trauma of actual CSA victims in their quest to make Klance the one true pairing. I hate that Klance fans have attacked the creators and voice actors of the show in the same way, I hate that @bext-k has been treated so horribly here on tumblr and then been told she couldn’t defend herself because her bully was a minor (a minor, but not a toddler, someone who is perfectly capable of not being an asshole and whose age does not make it okay for them to say the things they said). I cannot stand the Klance meta posts that analyze the heck out of every interaction between the two of them, and at the same time ignore much more meaningful interactions between characters like Shiro and Keith and deny that there could be anything more than friendship between them. It isn’t that deep, I’m sorry, it just isn’t, and it’s embarrassing to see how far of a reach Klance fans make sometimes in order to make their ship as canon as possible. And look, to a degree, I get it. I love Klance. But I do not love the way so many Klance shippers have broken apart this fandom and created spaces so toxic that CSA victims’ voices cannot even be heard without being shut down, mocked, and insulted. I do not love the way I now I have to check every unknown blog’s description before reblogging a post from them to make sure they don’t say “shaladins get out” or “stinky anti” there. I do not love the way that adult antis claim they are protecting minors and then turn around and reblog nsfw fanart of Keith and Lance, two characters who they apparently see as minors, even going so far as to tag it with things like “yaoi” or “this is so sinful” or something equally insulting. I do not love the way antis gaslight and guilt-trip, I do not love the insidious mob mentality that leads to people feeling afraid of not thinking the way other antis do. I do not love the all too prevalent fujoshi culture found among Klance shippers - have you ever noticed that the overwhelming majority of Klance shippers are teenage to twenty-something girls? Whereas all of the queer guys I know of in this fandom are multishippers and/or ship Sheith or Shance. Why don’t we acknowledge that? Why don’t we acknowledge that queer guys, whose relationships we are writing/drawing/analyzing and fangirling about, have an opinion here, and that their opinion maybe, just MAYBE, matters more than ours? In Hypable’s Battleships poll, this was literally proven - way more guys voted for Sheith than voted for Klance. But Sheith is the toxic relationship. Uh-huh. Right. Okay. Even though they’re both adults and have shown each other nothing but love, trust, and respect. This is what infuriates me about so many Klance shippers. The willful blindness to even acknowledge that other sides, other ships, may have merit. And of course this isn’t all of them, I ship Klance and I know many others who do and who don’t share this mentality that makes me so sad and upset. But there are a significant amount of Klance shippers who do. Why can’t there just be a dialogue? Why can’t antis be people who may not like Shaladin ships but understand that this is a fictional show, people are entitled to their opinions, blacklisting tags/blocking users/not looking at content you don’t like is a valid option, and words like pedophilia and “go kill yourself” should not be thrown around as lightly and frequently as they are? I wish we could. I really wish we could. And I also wish I could ship Klance as much as I want to without constantly being reminded of all the hate spread by people who call it their OTP.

me: yep haha ofc klance will always be close to my heart!

Little details you don’t notice at first (1/?)

-Even most likely comforting Isak and chasing away his fears while having his arms around Isak’s waist (or holding his hand).

Do you ever just think of Ethan Nakamura and cry a little bit because he sacrificed so much of himself little by little to do what he thought was right? Like in his final moments all he could think about and ask for was that the minor gods and their children

“Deserve better… if only they just… had thrones—”

Like do you ever just think about that

anonymous asked:

I have a lesbian who is hunted by a monster for much of my book, and I've been avoiding it (she only barely escapes at first) but I think she needs to die. How do I do it tactfully? She's not the only lgbt main char but I want to do her justice

The Bury Your Gays Breakdown, from a Super Mysterious Assistant

Alright!  First, in case it’s helpful for anyone reading, I’m going to go into “should she die?”  It sounds like you’re pretty settled on that, but bear with me for a minute here.

So you want to kill your lesbian (or otherwise not-staight-and-cis) character!

The first thing you should consider is, does she have to die?  If so, why?  Is it the logical conclusion of her character arc to die?  Is there no other possible way the plot could be resolved?  If you can’t answer “yes” to one or both of those, you might want to reconsider killing her.  (If the answer to “why does she need to die?” is “so her girlfriend is single again and can be paired with another character” then you really want to reconsider, because it will not look good and there will be backlash.)

The second thing to consider is, do you have other living representation?  This is pretty simple: if you only have one lesbian character, killing her is more of a problem, because then you’re killing 100% of your lesbian characters.  If you have five lesbian characters, killing one-who is now 20% of your lesbian characters-isn’t as big an issue.  Keep in mind, you also want to consider how significant these other characters are: if you kill off a major lesbian character, you need other major lesbian characters to balance it out; minor characters who have two lines in the entire book don’t count, even if they’re lesbians.  (Whether other LGBT characters count is a bit of a gray area.  If you have one lesbian character who dies, but a bisexual, a transgender, a gay, and an ace character that live, it’s not quite as good as having several living lesbian characters, but it’s better than only having living straight-and-cis characters.)

So you’ve decided you have a good reason to kill your lesbian character, and your story won’t be bereft of any living representation when you do?  Let’s talk about how to kill her well!

The first rule is, however your character dies, it should not have to do with her being a lesbian.  She should not be seduced by a woman who turns out to be an assassin (or vampire) and murders her.  She should not run into Zeus, who kills her for refusing him.  She should, probably, not be shot and killed by a stray bullet, although five years from now that one might be okay.  What kills her should be just as likely (historically, in both media and real life, as well as logically) to kill anyone else.

The second rule is, her death has to be the result of her choice.  She shouldn’t die because someone else decided to kill her, and she didn’t have enough plot armor to stop them.  She should die because she made a decision-maybe not rational, maybe not fully aware of the risks, but her own decision-and that decision directly resulted in her death.  She stepped in front of the charging mook to protect the hero while he finished the spell that will save the world, or she decided to cross the canyon on the rickety bridge as a shortcut, and it broke when she was halfway across.

The third rule is, her death has to matter to the plot.  This one is a little hard to pin down, because “the plot” is such a variable thing, but the general idea is: imagine if, instead of dying, your lesbian character got exasperated with these idiots she’s been hanging around with, bought a bus ticket to California, and lived out the rest of her life in happy plot-free-land.  Would the rest of your story go the same way, minor details (such as a mention of her) aside?  Then there is a problem.  If, however, whatever she does while or because she’s dying, or what she does that results in her death, changes the direction of the plot, then her death matters.

Now, one last thing: if you do all this, your reader, or listeners, or watchers, will still be upset.  But if they’re upset because a favorite character of theirs died, rather than because another lesbian was killed for no purpose but sensationalism, then you’ve done your job well.

2

Matsunami Yuuki (Sarukui) and his dog Meru-kun!  

Apparently Meru-kun is a 1-yr old dog, and his left leg will be fully healed in another 2 months or so.

9

@hpeditsnet creation event: get to know the members week - zelle
day two: favorite minor character - pansy parkinson

“being safe was better than being vulnerable, and it helped her avoid feeling too much useless hope.” (source)

To Note:

This is how I study literature and it works for me( my lit exams marks are typically above 75) but everyone is different and it is important that you use what works for you! I hope this helps you in any way big or small!


1: Read the novel. Just read it with no stopping to take notes or highlight, if possible try to enjoy it. This gives you a general idea of all the themes, plots,characters and others.

2: Get a notebook  or leaflets of paper binder/folder to keep it all in one place. I prefer a notebook. What I have in this notebook:

  • I tend to leave the first page blank and later paste a quote on it.
  • table of contents.
  • summary of full book.
  • any research on particular topics (this was homework but i would recommend researching a little if the book mentions a lot of like historical stuff or things you just don’t know).
  • the main character’s family tree.
  • a page each for the main characters then I put a page for important families in the book (examples Radley and Ewells family in To Kill A Mockingbird). As well as one or two pages titled ‘minor characters’ where any little detail about these characters can be jotted down here. More on what these pages contain later on.
  • chapter summaries in order, with beginning and ending page numbers along with a short analysis (on a post-it). I also add a quote that I i liked or felt was important but that isn’t necessary as quotes are covered later down. These summaries are written after I reread that particular chapter, where I underline words I don’t know the meaning of and you can highlight important thing if you want,preferably to a colour code system. here’s a nice little guide to annotating by @mildstudies

3: So what I usually have on these main characters’ pages are:

  • basic character information (name, age, race.
  • character sketch (basically the qualities of the person like bravery and kindness).
  • character growth (more so for the protagonist).
  • an important quote or two that was said by the character but again that’s not necessary.
  • my thoughts on the character which I think is really important.

4: Quotes are very important in literature and most if not all teachers will encourage you to use them in your essays so these are two things you can do:

  • just write quotes that each person said on their character’s page and quotes from the narrative itself on a separate page.
  • or the second way which I prefer is to arrange these quotes by chapter, highlighting which character said it and then writing a brief analysis on it. You can also arrange them by person and highlight the chapter and page number. I love either ways.

5: Vocabulary is also important ( my teacher once told me about a question asking for the meaning of 'spittoon’ in To Kill A Mockingbird.) When reading over the novel I underline words I don’t know and transfer them onto a separate sheet of paper (arrange by chapter) and write down the meanings. You can use two columns to do this, one with word and the other definition. You can also use studyign’s summary foldables method and make (online) flashcards to test yourself.

6: Reviewing for exams can be hard, especially if you don’t have the time to reread the entire books. But that’s okay because you have the chapter summaries and analysis and all your other information although I do recommend reading or simply skimming the really important chapters. Here are some other tips:

  • know your exam format and the type of questions. My exam typically gives us two choices for the novel, each of which gives us a particular topic (one example is Jem’s punishment for what he did to Mrs. Dubose) and then three to four things they’d like us to include (example: why did he do that to Mrs. Dubose.) We are to write these in essay formats.
  • write essays on the book to review later (for TKAM I’m writing an essay on the theme racism using references from the book as well as I wrote a view on Scout’s character and Atticus’ parenting style.) This is really good to read before an exam.
  • do mock papers, preferably within the usual time period of your exams.
  • get a good night sleep, eat a good breakfast and believe in yourself. You’ve put in the work, you’ll reap the benefits.

anonymous asked:

You're an android user right? How are you liking V route so far T_T

Hello yes, I had to start later than other Android users (thanks Internet!) but I got to day 6 and I’m absolutely loving the route, the thrill of not knowing what will happen next and the fact that those two guys are growing on me 👀
I haven’t been able to play for the last 2 days for (happy) real life reasons, but I’m dying to continue.

YAS GIVE ME EVERYTHING. I missed them ❤

“I’d say that it’s one short step from ‘Wizards first’ to ‘Purebloods first,’ and then to ‘Death Eaters,’ ” replied Kingsley. “We’re all human, aren’t we? Every human life is worth the same, and worth saving.”
“Excellently put, Royal, and you’ve got my vote for Minister of Magic if ever we get out of this mess,” said Lee.

Nobody can tell me that Kingsley Shacklebolt doesn’t keep in touch with Lee Jordan after the war. Kingsley is usually calm and firm during his regular interviews, so everyone is baffled by how frequently he jokes around with their favorite morning radio host. They debate ministry issues and possible solutions as Lee calls out ministry bigots. Kingsley’s unable to hold back a snort multiple times.
2

Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera

Summary: Juliet Milagros Palante is leaving the Bronx and headed to Portland, Oregon. She just came out to her family and isn’t sure if her mom will ever speak to her again. But Juliet has a plan, sort of, one that’s going to help her figure out this whole “Puerto Rican lesbian” thing. She’s interning with the author of her favorite book: Harlowe Brisbane, the ultimate authority on feminism, women’s bodies, and other gay-sounding stuff. 

Will Juliet be able to figure out her life over the course of one magical summer? Is that even possible? Or is she running away from all the problems that seem too big to handle? 

With more questions than answers, Juliet takes on Portland, Harlowe, and most importantly, herself.

Thoughts: This is a character-driven book that follows Juliet’s journey as a lesbian Latina leaving the Bronx and navigating the white feminist world of Portland. If you are new to the world of feminism, queer activism, and intersectionality, this book is a great introduction - that also serves as a critique of the whiteness and cissexism in these communities. This book is a love letter to queer women of color, who so rarely see themselves authentically represented in media. If you are a white queer woman like me, this book is a must-read to reflect on our privilege and understand the importance of QPOC-only spaces.

If I haven’t already convinced you, there is also an adorable romance with a cute girl who works at the library and rides a motorcycle. Read this book!

Warnings: 

  • Sexual harassment
  • Homophobia from family
  • Racist and transphobic microaggressions from white feminists (that are critiqued)
  • A chapter on menstruation
  • Discussion of sexual assault and trauma
  • Use of queer as a reclaimed slur
2

@aaronminyarddefencenet’s first creation event: week two >> favourite minor character

“one day i want you to look up ‘insensitivity’ in the dictionary,” matt said, annoyed. “i’m sure it’ll do your ego wonders to see your picture printed beside it.”