with reading

Because
I want to do
something
reckless,
dangerous,
extraordinary—
something
that will push me
out of my
comfort zone,
something
that will take me
far from where
I came from—
an adventure
that was like—
I’m walking pass
through the gates
of hell
but it feels
as sweet
as heaven
making me
gasp for air—

and yes,
it was
falling in love
with you.

—  ma.c.a // Should I fight my feelings for you?

“I don’t miss the travelling every day but I do miss meeting & seeing you all. Music has always been the way I felt connected with the world. I’ve enjoyed some of my time off but it has been really difficult sometimes to be honest. I hope I emerge as a better, balanced person who has her health in check. I’ve been suffering from fatigue for a long time and I’m just starting the process of getting to the bottom of it. Just wanted to write to those of you who follow my music to say that I am songwriting, (always am) but I take breaks in between writing trips to rest and do other stuff (Um… Did someone say FLORISTRY course?) I’d really like to write a blog post about some other topics but it’s a big one so I’ll leave it for another time. Lots of love + luck. You all give my life joy and it’s an honour to be a small part of your lives. 🌷Marina xxx” (via Instagram)

Neil: (on the phone) Matt, you locked me out of the house again.

Matt: Oh crap, sorry! I’ll be there in like twenty.

Neil: ‘Kay. … Hey, how thick would you say the glass in the door is? Like, an inch?

Matt: Uh, maybe? Wait. Neil, what are you doing?

Neil: (wrapping jacket around hand) Don’t worry, I’ve got this.

Matt: Neil don’t you DARE do what I think you’re about to-

(sound of glass shattering over the line)

Mon El’s role

So Supergirl has been very explicitly referencing the election this season. They’re not being even a little subtle. Supergirl’s America has a female president, and she says something about how she can’t believe anyone even voted for the other guy. I think they used the phrase “nasty woman” twice now. Thematically, they’re really trying to make it obvious. 

And now we have the leaders of Daxam saying they need to “make Daxam great again,” with the response that “Daxam was never great.”

Here’s what I think that means thematically, and how I think Mon El factors into this particular message. The United States of Supergirl’s world has some issues, but they’re working specifically on protecting the aliens immigrating there. Between Lena and the president, we have strong female characters in positions of power. We also have Lyra, who is a refugee coming from a bad situation. So in Supergirl’s universe, America is not perfect, but getting better. It’s kind of going down the path that we wish the real US would start following. 

And as for Daxam. After this week’s episode, the parallels between the current administration and Mon El’s parents moved from debatable to explicit. I think that Daxam is meant to represent the worst parts of our country- our past, what we could become under this administration, the growing nationalist mindset of “America first.” We may not have slavery anymore, but we did. And what we do have are undocumented immigrants being paid next to nothing while certain people claim that they’re the ones benefitting from the deal (see: Mon El’s mother talking about how they give their servants a better life). We also have a system where the very privileged benefit from the suffering of the lower and middle class (see: “…letting myself be propped up at the expense of our people”). Daxam is Trump’s America, in short. It is what we could become- what we’re in danger of becoming. 

Which brings me to Mon El’s role to the overall theme here. Mon El isn’t heroic, initially. He was raised in a place where all this inequality was normalized, by parents who taught him that it was okay, where he benefitted from the system. And he did what most people do in that situation: nothing. He chose to turn a blind eye. He was afraid of his parents, afraid of confronting all the problems with his world, afraid of acknowledging what he was doing wrong. In the real flashback where he leaves Daxam, it seems clear that he knows that this is wrong. It also seems clear that he’s never done anything about it. 

So he leaves Daxam, where he is privileged and ignorant and cowardly. He gets to this new place, with all these heroic people around him (see: my earlier post about this). One of the first things that happens is Kara calling him out, personally. This is when he starts being forced to confront what he took part in on Daxam. He moves from the Trump America Metaphor to the optimistic view of America. He doesn’t do a 180 flip or anything- it takes some time to to change and unlearn his upbringing on Daxam. And he makes a lot of mistakes while he’s trying to change, like lying and denying who he was and not listening. He even tries to defend Daxam and “the prince” at first, because he doesn’t want to admit who and what he was. Which was a spoiled, privileged guy who was too afraid to stand up for what was right. 

So what’s the message here? What are they trying to get at? Well, here’s the thing. We’d all like to believe that we’re Kara, standing up for what’s right no matter what. Or that we’re Lena, willing to go against our families if they’re wrong. Or that we’re James, with the drive to do good and the desire to be a hero. Or that we’re Winn, continuing to do what’s right no matter how scared we are. 

The fact of the matter is that not everyone is Kara. Many, many people are Mon El- unwilling to confront their privilege, scared to go against the majority, preferring to deny their part in the oppression of others. We see it all the time, every day, constantly. Mon El, as a written character, is calling people out- “See what you sound like? See what you’re doing? Watch this character make your mistakes, and then consider how you feel.”

On Daxam, like in our country under this administration, we can’t really afford to be bystanders. We can’t afford to be neutral, to refuse to take a stand, to just go on believing that we don’t have to do anything because someone else will. So when Mon El starts trying to change, clumsily and slowly and with a lot of help, here’s what the message is:

It’s not too late to be on the right side of history. It’s not too late to stand up.