with a law degree

abstract-sunshine  asked:

Tim goes to community college because lets be real high school drop out tim couldnt be assed to do ivy league.

HONESTLY THO like?? I can’t really see Tim even NEEDING to go to college? I mean, unless he’s going for like idk a medical/law/whatever degree but still, I really just. dont see it. he hated going to school?? he was GOOD at it but he hated it. why do u want to go to college Tim it’s just more school and suffering

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For Refinery29’s celebration of Black History Month we put together a list of Black men and women you ought to know. Their legacy in civil rights, feminism, and LGBTQ equality lives on today.

  1. Bayard Rustin — A leading Black figure in the civil rights movement and advisor to Martin Luther King, he was the architect of the 1963 March on Washington and was heavily involved in the first Freedom Rides. He was also gay and a registered communist who went to jail for his sexual orientation. Although widely heralded, he was attacked even by fellow activists for his faith in nonviolence, unapologetic queerness, and attention to income equality. President Obama honored Rustin posthumously with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013.
  2. Combaheee River Collective — A seminal Black lesbian feminist group active from 1974-1980. Although officially short lived, its influence has been major. The group is best known for writing the Combaheee River Collective Statement, an important document in promoting the idea that social change must be intersectional — and that Black women’s needs were not being met by mainstream white feminism and therefore must strike out on their own. Members of the collective included Audre Lorde and…Chirlane McCray, now First Lady of New York City and author of the landmark essay “I Am a Lesbian,” published in Essence in 1979.
  3. John Carlos, Tommie Smith, and Peter Norman — The winners of the 1968 Mexico City Olympics 200 Meter Sprint. In one of the proudest and most political moments of sports history, John Carlos and Tommie Smith raised their leather-gloved fists in the Black Power salute. They wore black socks without shoes to represent black poverty and a scarf and necklace to symbolize “those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.”

    We also include in our list Peter Norman, the white Australian silver medalist from that ceremony, to commemorate his solidarity with the two Black athletes. White people are more than indebted to black history, and Norman is an excellent example of a white ally. Although he didn’t perform the black power salute, he publicly supported the duo without regard to personal safety or retribution. Norman was penalized for his alliance with Carlos and Smith and was never again allowed to compete in any Olympics despite repeatedly qualifying. Largely forgotten and barred from major sporting events, he became a gym teacher and worked at a butcher shop. At his funeral in 2006, John Carlos and Tommie Smith were his pallbearers.
  4. The Friendship Nine — This group of nine Black students from Friendship Junior College willingly went to jail without bail in 1961 after staging a sit-in at McCrory’s lunch counter in Rock Hill, South Carolina. They pioneered the civil rights strategy “Jail, No Bail,” which placed the financial burden for racist incarceration back on the state. They’re appreciated today for their bravery and strategic ingenuity. In 2015 their conviction was finally overturned and prosecutor Kevin Brackett personally apologized to the eight living members of the group.
  5. Barbara Jordan — A lawyer and politician, Barbara Jordan was the first Black woman elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, the first southern Black woman to be elected as a US Senator, and the first Black woman to deliver a keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention. Her keynote address is widely considered the greatest of all time, aided by her charismatic and eloquent public speaking skills. She is also remembered as one of the leaders of the impeachment of Richard Nixon. We chose the above quote to illustrate her unique punchy sense of humor.
  6. Pauli Murray — This civil rights activist, feminist, and poet was a hugely successful lawyer who is also recognized as the first Black female Episcopal priest. Like many figures on this list, Murray was acutely aware of the complex relationship between race and gender, and referred to sexism as “Jane Crow,” comparing midcentury treatment of women to that of African Americans in the South. Although she graduated from Howard University first in her class, she was barred from enrolling as a postgraduate at Harvard because she was a woman. Instead, in 1965 she became the first African American to receive a JSD from Yale Law. Once armed with a law degree she became a formidable force in advancing feminist and civil rights. She is a cofounder of the National Organization for Women (NOW). She also identified as having an “inverted sex instinct,” which she used instead of “homosexual” to describe her complicated gender identity and lifelong attraction to women.
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Hi guys,

I apologize for my long absence but I have been so extremely busy ever since I started my Practical Legal
Training, it’s the worst thing ever… I used to think getting a law degree was difficult but this stuff is on a different level ⚖️

At the moment I’m preparing for Trial Advocacy which is totally nerve wrecking but I finally feel like I’m getting a hang of it 🎉

I’m a bit more active over on my Instagram, so if you want to follow along on this crazy law journey with me, follow me on Instagram: charlenevenice

Sending you guys a lot of positive study vibes, have a great and productive day my loves 💕

[Studying law] was awful. It’s one thing speaking fluent German, and another thing understanding the German constitution, which I hadn’t grown up with, or legalese in German. It was incredibly, fiendishly complicated. And I just wasn’t in the mood to learn that. What I was in love with was the idea of being a lawyer – the briefcase, the BMW, the raincoat, the standing up in court proving somebody’s innocence. Which essentially was sort of acting.

2

Critical Writing Tips: How to Get a First!

Show ability to deal confidently with the relevant principles.
- Do not sound hesitant or passive.
- Frame your opinion with words like “can”, and write that you “will” argue it.
- Show you really believe in your points.

Demonstrate a capacity for independent thought. 
- Show you have read competing viewpoints, choose one and argue it.
- Acknowledge counter-arguments to show wider reading.

Show that you can critically assess arguments.
- Identify weaknesses in the arguments made in the relevant literature.

Evidence your point of view by including your opinion. 
- Start with your thesis and make it run throughout the essay.
- Make sure it is a reasoned view, supported by evidence.
- Include as many footnotes of sources as possible!

Include relevant quotations and references to views expressed in the relevant literature. 
- Read beyond the reading list given to you in lectures, tutorials/seminars.

Write in a logical, coherent manner. 
- Be succinct.

THIRTEEN’s The Talk – Race in America Tackles the Issue of Young People of Color and Their Uneasy Encounters With Law Enforcement. It premieres Monday, February 20, 9 p.m. on PBS. In anticipation of that premiere Tumblr and THIRTEEN  have convened officers, advocates and policy experts to discuss the state of community policing in the United States. 

Dr. Bryant T. Marks is a National Trainer on Implicit Bias and Community Policing. He has trained over 1,000 police chiefs via a series of White House briefings, and several thousand patrol officers through small group workshops in police departments across the country. He is a professor of psychology at Morehouse College and also serves as a Senior Research Fellow with the Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

John Matthews is the Executive Director of the Community Safety Institute (CSI) and a former Chief of Police. John developed and implemented community policing for the Dallas Police Department in the 1990’s and has worked nationally on scores of COPS Office initiatives over the past twenty years developing over 100 community policing training programs. John also serves as the Director of Federal Partnerships for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and was a member of the White House 21st Century Policing team.

Bakari Kitwana is the executive director of Rap Sessions, which is currently touring the nation leading town hall discussions on the theme “Run Toward Fear: Millennial Activists and Social Justice in the Trump Era” He is the author of The Hip-Hop Generation: Young Blacks and the Crisis in African-American Culture the forthcoming Hip-Hop Activism in the Obama Era.

Trevena Garel is a retired New York City Police Sergeant. During her 21-year career Trevena served as both an undercover and an investigator in the NYPD’s Chief of Patrol’s Investigation and Evaluation Section, investigating allegations of misconduct involving both uniformed and/or civilian members of the NYPD. Trevena has had “The Talk” with her three children and her two oldest grandchildren.

Chief Michael Koval began his career with the Madison Police Department in 1983. Before becoming the Chief in 2014 he was the Sergeant of Recruitment and Training for 17 years. He has a law degree from William Mitchell College of Law.

The Ask Box is now open.  Ask our panelists a question!

Our panelists will start responding on Saturday, February 18. 

Hello! It’s #optomstudies here again with another Sunday Study Tip on university life! This will be a multi-part series that hopefully will give a unique insight, since I can go on and on about university, and I love giving advice and helping others :)


PART 0: CHOOSING A DEGREE

Here I’ve put together a list of 20 things that you might not be told outright when choosing your university degree. @exeron

General Starting Tips During High School

  • It doesn’t matter what subjects you do in senior year, so don’t worry about bonus points, as long as you get a high enough ATAR so that you can keep your options open. Play to your strengths.
  • But! On the other hand, don’t take history and visual arts for your HSC and expect to be at the same level as your peers when you take a B Science (Advanced Mathematics) degree. You need that calculus knowledge. (Most of the time this isn’t a problem, because most people will choose a degree that aligns with their interests in high school). Again, play to your strengths.
  • Keep on top of your extra-curricular activities in case you need to go for an interview like with medicine.
  • Some degrees like optometry, medicine, law, etc. require additional exams like UMAT, so find out early, pay for the tests and mark it down on your calendar so that you don’t forget.
    • Up to you whether you want to pay extra for coaching, but anecdotally, I didn’t do any coaching and did fine. I had many friends who did coaching and ended up doing poorly. 
  • Choose a good university. Promise it actually counts at the end of the day. There are cases of people getting employed with low credit averages at big companies because they go to a good university.

Decide What Kind of Career You Want

  • Most importantly, it’s best if you pick your degree based on the job you want upon graduation. What you study at uni is just a means to an end. It’s a business decision that you are making - trading a few years to get a better career and better income at the end of the day.
  • Consider practical aspects of the job you want. For example, some of the things that I like about optometry is the fact that you aren’t sitting down the whole day, it’s a job that’s great for locum-ing and part-time work if I have kids in the future, and it makes for a good conversation starter when people ask you about optometric myths (no, looking at green grass does not help your eyes, nor do eating carrots, and having a nightlight doesn’t make you more short-sighted). These are all things that aren’t written down on a piece of paper somewhere, but are things that you can figure out by thinking about the everyday facets of the job itself.
  • Figure out your career values. These are things that you don’t want to compromise on due to personal integrity, as opposed to areas of interest. Some examples are:
    • Autonomy and independence
    • Achievement and advancement prospects
    • Creativity
    • Security
    • Altruism
    • Prestige, status and respect
    • Risk-taking and excitement
    • Material benefits a.k.a. $$$
    • Power
    • Team membership
    • Variety
    • Learning
    • Structure and organisation
    • Problem Solving
    • Leadership
    • Work-Life Balance
  • Don’t “follow your passion”, just “get good”. A lot of people also tell you that you should “follow your passion”, but most of the time you have limited experience concerning the types of occupations in the world, and most of the time there isn’t anything that you’ve developed a strong passion for. You might have a bunch of interests like me; when I was in high school, I enjoyed every single subject, because I just enjoyed learning in general, so the only thing I could think of was literally to become a full time uni student. This video really sums everything up quite well, so I’ll quote from it.

When you work hard at something you become good at it.
When you become good at something you enjoy doing it more. 
When you enjoy doing something, there is a good chance you will become passionate about it.

Start By Choosing a Good University and Faculty

  • Choose a Commonwealth-supported university. Don’t saddle yourself with excess debt from a private university unless your grades were so bad that you needed to pay money for a university degree. If you have the choice, don’t opt for these.
  • Go to open days! I seriously think I wouldn’t have chosen optometry if I didn’t go to the UNSW Open Day. The guy was just really persuasive about the benefits of the career.
  • Ask graduates! If you’ve got a retail job and have the opportunity to chat with people about their jobs, see what they like about their job and how they got there.
  • Opt to specialise. For example, if you are aiming to be a financial data scientist, then go for a B Economics and major in econometrics. Sounds simple, but people always argue about choosing a general degree like Commerce so that you have a broader choice and keep your doors open. This is only good if you don’t have an end goal in sight. Specialising shows employers that you have direction and are driven.
  • However, if you have absolutely no idea what you want to study then at least choose a faculty that you find palatable, try and do your research, or take some core courses that allow you to discern your major. If all else fails, just get the UAC book of degrees and cross out what you don’t want to do LOL

After Starting the Degree

  • If you start a degree and you find the first semester or two isn’t what you were imagining, unfortunately that’s what happens to a lot of people. Uni isn’t a vocational school that jumps straight into the professional skills. So if you want to be a pediatrician who nurses cute children to health at the end of the day, sorry but you’ll have to start with basic sciences. I’ve seen a lot of people jump ship just cause they didn’t like the first few courses.
  • Go for Honours if your degree has the option. Just looks a lot better in the eyes of an employer that you’ve tried challenging yourself with a research honours project. A 1 year trade off in studying is worth it.
  • Don’t worry about the length of the degree. Three years will be over before you know it, trust me! And honestly, university is actually a really great time period. Many of my older cousins reflect on it and say that in a way, it was some of the best times of their lives, because you don’t have the responsibility of the household bills and full time work just yet.
  • Don’t be afraid to change your degree after the first year. Some microeconomics - it’s a sunk cost.

Don’t think: “Oh I’ve already spent this much time studying this degree, it will be a waste if I change degrees”.
Think: “if I spend any more time in this degree that I don’t actually want to study, then I’ll be wasting my future”. 

  • You aren’t “wasting” your ATAR by choosing a degree that has a much lower cut-off point. For example, if you wanted to shape the future of children by becoming a teacher, you aren’t “wasting” your 98 ATAR by going into teaching, even if the cut-off is 81.
  • Don’t let other people influence your options. Look, if you’re going to change your uni choice just because someone you don’t like is going there… you’ll barely see anyone except for the people in the same degree as you after 1st year is over. Likewise, parents give advice, they don’tshouldn’t mandate life choices like what you study. 

Good luck with your university applications. Hope you all get into the degree that you’re hoping for! Hit me up if you have any questions :) 


MY WEEKLY STUDY TIPS

WHAT I WISH I’D KNOWN BEFORE UNIVERSITY STUDY TIPS SERIES

SEE ALSO

anonymous asked:

Dan and Phil are roommates in college, Dan's horny and has been begging Phil all day to fuck him and make him cum and Phil finally caves when Dan starts jerking off in the shower while he's trying to do his homework so he puts on a cock ring and fucks dan until he passes out(aftercare too) and they don't go to their first class the next day cuz they're too tired lol overstimulation, cockslut!dan, choking and hairpulling

I also added a weeeeeny bit of daddy!kink and gave Dan a tongue piercing because why not? If you have trouble getting past the cut on mobile open in your browser!

When Phil first meets his university roommate, he knows he’s hit the jackpot. The boy who’s sitting on one of the single beds introduces himself as Dan, and suddenly Phil isn’t quite so regretful over his decision to live in one of the cramped one-room suites on campus, rather than paying extra for the more spacious dorms down the road. Dan is gorgeous, to say the least. He has these pretty brown eyes surrounded by fans of long lashes and lovely, dark locks that feather out against his face. His smile is so bright it might not even be an issue that there’s only one tiny window in the cinderblock room and that the lightbulb screwed into the cracked ceiling is basically useless.  He’s classically beautiful – but that isn’t necessarily what makes Phil decide he needs to have him within the first three seconds of knowing him. It’s more likely that every fibre in this boys’ being screams twink. From the way he’s dressed, in skin tight black jeans and a deep plunging V-neck that’s probably two sizes too small, to the way he spreads his long body across the small bed like he’s there for a centrefold shoot. Phil’s staring at his pouty, full bottom lip wondering what it’d look like wrapped around his cock when Dan – on habit, or perhaps something else – pushes the silver ball of his tongue piercing out and gently grips it between his teeth, before retracting it back into his mouth. It’s then that Phil’s want becomes more of a need.

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When Dex invites Nursey to spend a chunk of the summer up in Maine, Nursey jumps at the opportunity faster than he’d openly admit (Dex is inwardly more excited at the affirmative than he’d openly admit as well). 

Despite hearing all about them, including an overview of every family member, Nursey is still unprepared for all the uncles that Dex has. Not all with the last name Poindexter (many of them in-laws); not all even officially uncles (rather many of them #-degree cousins whom are easier to call “Uncle”). Still, overall the family is a major presence in the small island community of less than a thousand folks.

To say nothing of the droves of cousins.   

So, to make things easy on himself, Nursey ends up categorizing each uncle (and their immediate family) by their vocation:

  • Boatdexter: Lobster boat uncle. 
  • Portdexter: Runs ferry service between Bar Harbor and Winter Harbor, including the island, which halfway on the route. Ferry functions as a commuter, school bus, and delivery service. 
  • Fixdexter: Repair shop. Is actually mainly a boatyard (a lot of the boats worked on are from off-island), but also can work on automobiles (which are barely used within the community). 
  • Shopdexter: Convenience and hardware store, with a backshop and fuel pumps (for both boats and cars), at the marina.
  • Dinedexter: Runs the main restaurant/bar/cafe in town. Also runs the inn that mostly sees business in the summertime. 
  • Waydexter: Maritime pilot who helps ships navigate the narrows. 
  • Bluedexter: Owns and runs a small scale farm mostly focused on blueberries. Not only taking the berries to market, but also opening the field to visitors so they can pick the fruit themselves (as blueberry season is in the summer, there is that sweet summer tourism traffic). Also grows other produce on the side. Farm overall is a joint-operation with…
  • Crandexter: Who mostly focuses on the small football field-sized cranberry bog adjacent to the rest of the farm (which he helps with as well). The bog is not flooded but rather dry-harvested.
  • Repdexter: Retired and now the village ombudsman to the county. 
  • Teachdexter: Him and his wife are teachers at the local school.
  • Tourdexter: Takes tourists around and past the bay during the summer, and works with Boatdexter in the off time. If you’re used to the rest of the family’s reservedness, his outgoing nature can be a bit unnerving. 
  • Copdexter: Sheriff deputy. 
  • Parkdexter: Ranger for the DACF. Also works with the NP rangers at Acadia.
  • Assdexter: Bigoted, misogynistic walking Breitbart mouthpiece. Quintessential Angry White Male™. 
  • And more…

Notes:

  • Assdexter’s existence is barely tolerated by the rest of the family (who are conservative, many with cringy traditionalist and heteronormative views, but not hateful/far-right; think more Collins, less LePage). That “barely” is simply by virtue of community and bloodlines, and the fact that he’s a useful extra hand. Other than that, “We have your back” does have its limits, and “tolerance” does not prevent a fist to the face. Doesn’t help that he may have called Dex a few choice words for choosing Samwell.
  • Conversations between Copdexter and Nursey get interesting. Seriously, they’re legit engaging discussions and debates that don’t always end in agreement but do involve civility and actual listening. To Nursey’s (and Dex’s) surprise, Copdexter’s the one to ask (not demand) Nursey (who otherwise would have stayed silent due to being a guest) first for an opinion.
  • Nursey’s favorites of Dex’s uncles are probably either Teachdexter or Parkdexter (especially after the latter toured the boys around on their free time).
  • Overall, Dex is chagrined at Nursey after finding out about the nicknames.
    • Then the uncles find out, and he’s scared that Nursey may no longer be welcome.
    • To his horror and frustration, they (barring Assdexter) actually find it amusing. Yeah, he wanted Nursey to fit in and be welcomed, but this is going too far.
    • Dex’s frustration may manifest along the lines of a sputtered “… liberal… idle rich… city boy…” accompanied by increasing redness as he short-circuits at the absurdity of it all.
    • In response, one of the uncles simply chirps, “Chill, Billy.”
random headcanons no one asked for

* 2D has one of those pill boxes and when she was little Noodle would sneak sweets or folded up Pokemon cards in it to try and make him feel better

* If Murdoc and Noodle are having a conversation they don’t want anyone else to hear they speak in Spanish or French. Even if it isn’t private, it’s just a little bonding thing for them

* Since he has a law degree 2D ends up being the bands emergency attorney. Normally he just ends up helping get Murdoc out of trouble though

* During phase 2 Noodle did her GCSEs online. The boys all pitched in, Russel helped with maths and art, 2D helped with english and Murdoc helped her with the sciences

* All of the band members end up stealing Russel’s clothes. He doesn’t mind though he just takes it as them being jealous of his fashion sense

* Murdoc made sure that Noodle was surrounded by other female musicians from a young age. He knew that the music industry could be a shitty place for her and he didn’t want anyone taking advantage of her

* 2D and Russel have a shared interest in space. They got a telescope a while back and sometimes on clear nights they set it up in the garden and have a look out of it whilst having a smoke

“Flat out” - h.s. Part 1

Prepare for the domestic cuteness.

—–

—–

It was more your flat than it was Harry’s now, after years of living in it. Originally, it had started under the premise that you would only remain in his flat for as long as it took you to find your own place. Which was fine, because he wasn’t staying there and you needed a place as uni started and you were friends, close friends, and it was all fine and dandy.

But then you really started to get busy with your schoolwork and considering the workaholic and professional perfectionist that you were, you were constantly on the move between classes and work and more classes and your second job. And besides, Harry was really only in and out at that point. The tour was coming to an end, the band was on their final days, and Harry really hadn’t thought much of it that you had now lived in his London flat for an entire year.

And also, he felt bad. He felt bad that you felt the need to always support and provide for yourself and that you were doing nothing but working yourself to death in order to pay your tuition and then be able to find your own living conditions and so finally he had said, “Just stay here. Stop worrying about it. You’re fine here, Y/N. Really.”

Though you’d fought it originally, you knew that in order to keep your perfect grades in tact and be able to get to work on time, there was no better place to live than where Harry was. You were centrally located now considering you’d applied to jobs close to Harry’s flat so you could walk, and you only had to walk a solid fifteen minutes to get on campus. You were comfortable, Harry was comfortable, all was well.

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Frank-Walter Steinmeier Next President of Germany

Today, February 12, 2017, Frank-Walter Steinmeier was elected by the Federal Convention (Bundesversammlung) as the next president of Germany. He will assume office on March 18, 2017.

Steinmeier, member of the SPD, was the candidate of the Great Coalition consisting of CDU, CSU, and SPD currently governing Germany. He was also supported by the Green Party and the FDP.

Dr. Frank-Walter Steinmeier grew up in a carpenter’s family in the rural Lippe area in North-Rhine-Westphalia. He studied law and political sciences in Gießen and received a doctoral degree in law in 1991. He was hired at the office of the prime minister of the state of Lower Saxony, Gerhard Schröder, in Hannover, where he quickly advanced his career. He followed Gerhard Schröder after his appointment as chancellor to Berlin, where he soon became chief of the Chancellor’s Office. In this position, he was one of the driving forces of the Agenda 2010 reforms, which are generally said to be the foundations of Germany’s current economical success, but were (and still are) controversially discussed with regards to their impact on social affairs and the coherence of the German society.

After Angela Merkel assumed Chancellorship of a Great Coalition in 2005, Steinmeier was appointed as foreign minister. In 2007, he became vice-chancellor. He was appointed again as foreign minister in the third cabinet of Angela Merkel and resigned in January 2017 after he was nominated as the joint presidential candidate of the Great Coalition.

In 2010, Steinmeier donated a kidney to his wife, Elke Büdenbender, to save her life.


Unlike in many other states, the president of Germany, as the official head of the state, has a mostly ceremonial and representative role. The duties of the office involve:

  • to represent Germany in the world under international law (signing international contracts, accrediting German diplomats, receiving international leaders and letters of accreditation of foreign diplomats, etc.)
  • to propose a chancellor candidate to the German parliament
  • to appoint and dismiss the chancellor (after parliamental vote) and the ministers of the federal government; the president does not have the right to reject the resignation of a chancellor
  • to appoint and dismiss high federal officials and military (requiring counter-signature of chancellor or the relevant minister)
  • to regularly meet with the chancellor and the ministers for confidential consultations
  • to sign and promulgate the law, with the right to reject his signature (happened only eight times so far)
  • to dissolve the Federal Diet (Bundestag, German parliament) under certain circumstances
  • to declare war, after the the government has determined a state of defense
  • to exercise the power of pardon on the federal level (but he has no right to issue an amnesty)
  • to declare a state of legislative emergency by request of the cabinet if no chancellor could be elected. During this period, bills submitted by the government become law after his signature even if the federal diet rejects them, but the Federal Council (upper chamber of parliament representing the sixteen states) has to approve them. Legislative emergency does non suspend basic human rights, nor does it give the executive branch exceptional power. Legislative emergency has never been declared so far.
  • to assume the patronage over projects and initiatives that have a positive impact on the German society. He is the regular patron of the German red cross and the German maritime search and rescue sevice.
  • to decide upon the national symbols after counter-signature of the chancellor
  • to occasion state ceremonies
  • to confer the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany and other minor decorations

The Federal President does not have the right to issue decrees without counter-signature of a member of the Federal Government; that means that he cannot execute political power against the will of the government, with the sole exception of the strictly regulated state of legislative emergency.

The Federal President, committed to political neutrality, usually acts by the power of the word. He is independent of daily politics and free to set his topics. This way, a number of presidents have by speeches initiated public debates that materialized in law some time later. Notable examples are the speech of Richard von Weizsäcker on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the end of world war II, and the “Ruck-Rede” (”Jerk Speech”) by Roman Herzog. The former speech substantially shaped Germany’s current culture of remembrance, the latter initiated the debate that eventually led to the Agenda 2010 reforms by the government of Gerhard Schröder.

In case the office of the president falls vacant, the president of the Federal Council (Bundesrat) temporarily assumes the duties of the office until a new president is elected, which should be done within 30 days.

The president enjoys immunity from prosecution and cannot be voted out of office. The Federal Diet can revoke the immunity in case the president is offended of willfully violating the law. The Federal constitutional court has then to determine whether the president is guilty of the offense and has the only authority to remove the president from the office.

The president resides in Bellevue Palace in Berlin and has a second office in Hammerschmidt Villa in Bonn. His car carries the number 0-1, and the aircraft carrying the president has the call sign German Air Force 001.

The president assumes a honorary godfathership for the seventh child of a family. He helps German artists in need by a single donation or by giving the a honorarium. He offers his congratulations for special anniversaries, such as the hundredth birthday of a German citizen.

The Other Side of the Bar

Summary: Bartender!Dean AU where he has a bet with you each night to see who can keep a straight face the longest. In Sam’s words, “This was the weirdest damn flirting he’d ever seen.”

Word Count: 2351

Warnings: Fluff!

A/N: I have this headcanon that if it wasn’t for Azazel and the hunting life, Dean would be the happiest guy out there. He would just be loving life and laughing around and basically be a force of nature that always gets what he wants. He would be unstoppable and would be so damn happy. So that’s the version of Dean that I imagined for this AU.

Version en Español: El Otro Lado de la Barro


“Sam, my man!” Terrance bellowed when Sam walked into the bar. Upon seeing his old friend, Sam broke into a smile and gripped his hand, pulling him in for hug. “Our boy Dean didn’t tell me you were in town.”

“Well, finals are finally over and Dean’s been after me about checking out his new bar since he opened it.” Sam glanced around the dimly lit room and couldn’t help but feel impressed. “So I thought I’d surprise him.”

For someone who hadn’t set foot in a college classroom, Dean was actually a pretty good businessman. This was the third bar that he’d opened in Eastern Kansas, and every bar that he owned was doing ridiculously well. When Dean asked Sam to take a look at his finances and make sure that everything looked good, Sam started rethinking his own life plan. If Dean was making that much per bar, then what in the world was Sam thinking, digging himself deeper into debt to get a law degree?

Speaking of Dean, Sam glanced around the packed room in search of his sandy-haired brother. As usual, he was behind the bar talking to a chick. But he wasn’t smiling or joking around like he usually did in the company of any living, breathing female.

“What the hell?” Sam asked, drawing Terrance’s attention. “He’s having an actual conversation with her instead of just flirting?”

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