winter storm

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No, Winter Storm Stella doesn’t disprove climate change

  • Climate change deniers are at it again. The logic goes, “How could global warming be real when your driveway is piling up with cold, cold snow?”
  • Well, there’s bad news for deniers — research has shown that extreme weather, for example, massive snowstorms, are actually linked to climate change.
  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency, which has studied climate change extensively winter storms have increased in both “frequency and intensity,” and climate change is “increasing the odds of more extreme weather events taking place.”
  • As meteorologist Eric Holthaus wrote in Slate in 2016, just after a record-breaking winter storm dropped 26.6 inches of snow on New York City in just one day, “there is clear evidence global warming is boosting the odds of recent big Northeast snowstorms.” Read more (3/13/17 6:21 PM)

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Someone told me long ago
There’s a calm before the storm
I know it’s been comin’ for some time
When it’s over so they say
It’ll rain a sunny day
I know shinin’ down like waterI want to know
Have you ever seen the rain?
I want to know
Have you ever seen the rain
Comin’ down on a sunny day? Creedence Clearwater Revival

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Winter In The South

The weatherman predicts 4 to 8 inches of snow. You are hesitant to believe it, but deep within your soul an urge of unknown origin begins. You must buy bread and milk. You have no idea why, but something ancestral is pushing you. When you arrive at the grocery store, the bread and milk are in short supply. As you reach the line, every cart is filled with bread and milk. What are they going to do with it? What are you going to do with it? You dare not guess, but pay for your 3 loaves and 3 gallons all the same and hope it lasts through the storm.

Concept: The Great Hall

We’re all vikings and there’s a winter storm raging outside. The severity of the storm has prompted everyone in the village to leave our homes and gather in the Great Hall.

Though the storm rages outside, its sounds are muffled by the strong, sturdy walls of the Hall. Inside we are all safe and warm. Many sit together by the central hearth, while others are spread out among the nooks, crannies, and rafters of the large space.

Some sleep beneath thick blankets, while others simply sit to listen, think, eat, or observe. There is room enough for all to have the space they need in the Great Hall.

Those who sit by the fire share jokes and stories, sometimes loudly, sometimes in dramatic whisper. Plans are made for the far-off Spring that will surely come. Everyone, from the children to the elders, are given their turn to be heard, and all are given full attention when they speak.

No one knows how long the storm outside will last. It could be hours, days, or weeks. But nobody is concerned about it. Inside the Great Hall, there is plenty of wood for the fire, plenty of food and drink to go around, and everyone in the village is safe and accounted for.

We’re all here, safely gathered in, and enjoying our time together as we weather the storm.

Algy tried to make his way back to his nest, but the storm force wind was much too strong for a fluffy bird. He dropped quickly down among the wet rocks at the end of the beach, and leaned back exhausted as the spray hurtled over his head. The sea in the wee bay beside his home was like a churning cauldron, and the surface of the water had turned entirely white, all across the bay. He had never seen anything quite like it before.

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