winkt

anonymous asked:

Daddy you are a cat person or a dog person?! OR MAYBE!! *claps* maybe you are an otter person! Like, they are soooo freacking cuteeee❤❤❤ (Yep, that's me, the one, who asked to adopt one *winkt*)

Honey..i love hyenas ..and ratss…*cackling*

Wenn die Liebe dir winkt, dann folge ihr, sind ihre Wege auch schwer und steil.
Und wenn ihre Flügel dich umhüllen, gib dich ihr hin, auch wenn das unterm Gefieder versteckte Schwert dich verwunden kann.
Und wenn sie zu dir spricht, glaube an sie, auch wenn ihre Stimme deine Träume zerschmettern kann wie der Nordwind den Garten verwüstet.
—  Khalil Gibran
Februar in Derbyshire

Über einen Monat war Rames jetzt schon in Derbyshire und er hatte immer noch keine Nachricht vom König erhalten, was ihn schon etwas ärgerte. Er hoffte, dass sein Brief bei dem schlechten Wetter überhaupt angekommen war und dass der König nicht bloß mit seiner neuen Liebschaft beschäftigt war. 
Aber an diesem Tag wollte er mal nicht daran denken. Durch Zufall hatte er erfahren, dass Lady Matilda heute Geburtstag hatte und er hatte beschlossen sie und ihre Schwester für den Abend an seinen Tisch einzuladen, damit sie nicht immer in ihren Gemächern essen mussten. Darum war er gerade im Stall auf der Suche nach seinen Männern. “Antonio!” rief er einen dann zu sich und winkte ihn zu sich her. “Ich möchte, dass du heute noch auf die Jagd gehst. Lady Matilda feiert heute Geburtstag und es soll ein Festessen geben.” trug er ihm auf.

We redefined words like bear, butch, otter, queen, and femme, and created new terms like drag queen, twink, and genderqueer. But just because the words like homosexual, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and asexual, have been created in the relatively recent past doesn’t mean they are anything new. Before we started using today’s terms, we were Winkte to the Ogala, A-go-kwe to the Chippewa, Ko’thlama to the Zuni, Machi to the Mapuchi, Tsecats to the Manghabei, Omasenge to the Ambo, and Achnutschik  to the Konyaga across the continents. While none of these terms identically mirror their more modern counterparts, all refer to some aspect of or identity related to same-gender love, same-sex sex, or crossing genders.

You are normal. You are not a creation of the modern age. Your identity is not a “trend” or a “fad.” Almost every country has a recorded history of people whose identities and behaviors bear close resemblance to what we’d today call bisexuality, homosexuality, transgender identity, intersexuality, asexuality, and more. Remember: The way Western culture today has constructed gender and sexuality is not the way it’s always been. Many cultures, from Papua New Guinea to Peru, accepted male-male sex as a part of ritual or routine; some of these societies believed that the transmission of semen from one man to another would make the recipient stronger. In the past, we often didn’t need certain words for the same-sex attracted, those of nonbinary gender, and others who did not conform to cultural expectations of their biological sex or perceived gender because they were not as unusual as we might today assume they were.

Being so unique and powerful has sometimes made others afraid of us. They arrested and tortured and murdered us. We are still executed by governments and individuals today in societies where we were once accepted us as important and equal members of society. They now tell us that “homosexuality is un-African” and “there are no homosexuals in Iran.” You and we know that these defensive comments are not true, but they still hurt. So when others gave us names like queer and dyke, we reclaimed them. When they said we were recruiting children, we said “I’m here to recruit you!” When they put pink and black triangles on our uniforms in the concentration camps, we made them pride symbols.

Those who challenge our unapologetic presence in today’s cultures, who try to deprive us of our rights, who make us targets of violence, remain ignorant of the fact that they, not us, are the historical anomaly. For much of recorded history, persecuting individuals who transgressed their culture’s norms of gender and sexuality was frowned upon at worst and unheard of at best. Today, the people who continue to harass us attempt to justify their cruel campaigns by claiming that they are defending “traditional” values. But nothing could be further from the truth.

—  Sarah Prager-The Advocate
huffingtonpost.com
Every LGBTQ+ Person Should Read This
Chances are you don't even know that you are holy, or royal or magic, but you are. You are part of an adoptive family going back through every generation of human existence.

We redefined words like bear, butch, otter, queen and femme, and created new terms like drag queen, twink and genderqueer. But just because the words like homosexual, bisexual, transgender, intersex and asexual, have been created in the relatively recent past doesn’t mean they are anything new. Before we started using today’s terms, we were Winkte to the Ogala, A-go-kwe to the Chippewa, Ko'thlama to the Zuni, Machi to the Mapuchi, Tsecats to the Manghabei, Omasenge to the Ambo and Achnutschik to the Konyaga across the continents. While none of these terms identically mirror their more modern counterparts, all refer to some aspect of, or identity related to, same-gender love, same-sex sex or crossing genders.

anonymous asked:

Daddyyyy, I'm a lil horny cornyyyy.. Let's film some good quality stuff *winkt winkt*

Get over there…*gets his camera*  You just don’t know what daddy got in store for ya….*chuckles while taking pictures of you*

Foto 173 zu “Ich schreibe über DICH!”

Wir sind uns nah

Wir sind uns nah in unsrer Ferne.
Wir wissen, wo der andre steht.
Wir sind verwurzelte Gefährten
auf einem rar besäten Weg.

Wir reden nicht, wir schicken Daten
und warten, bis das Häkchen blinkt.
Wir wünschen, ohne zu erwarten,
weil die Enttäuschung listig winkt.

Einst blühten wir und warfen Schatten
auf Pfade ohne Teerbelag.
Heut sind wir Stümpfe in dem Garten,
wo keiner mehr nach Worten fragt.

Und doch sind wir noch ohne Zweifel,
wir wissen, wo der andre steht.
Egal, was die Prognosen sagen,
weil jeder Sturm einmal vergeht

und jede Sonne geht zuneige,
und jeder Stern verglüht einmal.
Wir sind uns nah in unsrer Ferne.
Sie macht uns menschlich, schön und wahr.