will purdue

Meet America’s #NewAstronauts

We’re so excited to introduce America’s new astronauts! After evaluating a record number of applications, we’re proud to present our 2017 astronaut class!

These 12 new astronaut candidates were chosen from more than 18,300 people who submitted applications from December 2015 to February 2016. This was more than double the previous record of 8,000 set in 1978.

Meet them…

Kayla Barron

This Washington native graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a Bachelor’s degree in Systems Engineering. A Gates Cambridge Scholar, Barron earned a Master’s degree in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Cambridge.

She enjoys hiking, backpacking, running and reading.

Zena Cardman

Zena is a native of Virginia and completed a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and Master of Science degree in Marine Sciences at The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research has focused on microorganisms in subsurface environments, ranging from caves to deep sea sediments.

In her free time, she enjoys canoeing, caving, raising backyard chickens and glider flying.

Raja Chari

Raja is an Iowa native and graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1999 with Bachelor’s degrees in Astronautical Engineering and Engineering Science. He continued on to earn a Master’s degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

He has accumulated more than 2,000 hours of flight time in the F-35, F-15, F-16 and F-18 including F-15E combat missions in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Matthew Dominick

This Colorado native earned a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of San Diego and a Master of Science degree in Systems Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. He graduated from U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

He has more than 1,600 hours of flight time in 28 aircraft, 400 carrier-arrested landigns and 61 combat missions.

Bob Hines

Bob is a Pennsylvania native and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from Boston University. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School, where he earned a Master’s degree in Flight Test Engineering. He continued on to earn a Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Alabama.

During the last five years, he has served as a research pilot at NASA’s Johnson Space Center.

Warren Hoburg

Nicknamed “Woody”, this Pennsylvania native earned a Bachelor’s degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkley.

He is an avid rock climber, moutaineer and pilot.

Jonny Kim

This California native trained and operated as a Navy SEAL, completing more than 100 combat operations and earning a Silver Star and Bronze Star with Combat “V”. Afterward, he went on to complete a degree in Mathematics at the University of San Diego and a Doctorate of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

His interests include spending time with his family, volunteering with non-profit vertern organizations, academic mentoring, working out and learning new skills.

Robb Kulin

Robb is an Alaska native and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Denver, before going on to complete a Master’s degree in Materials Science and a Doctorate in Engineering at the University of California, San Diego.

He is a private pilot and also enjoys playing piano, photography, packrafting, running, cycling, backcountry skiing and SCUBA diving.

Jasmin Moghbeli

This New York native earned a Bachlor’s degree in Aerospace Engineering with Information Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, followed by a Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School.

She is also a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and has accumulated mofre than 1,600 hours of flight time and 150 combat missions.

Loral O’Hara

This Texas native earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Kansas and a Master of Science degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University.

In her free time, she enjoys working in the garage, traveling, surfing, diving, flying, sailing, skiing, hiking/orienteering, caving, reading and painting.

Frank Rubio

Frank is a Florida native and graduated from the U.S. Military Academy and earned a Doctorate of Medicine from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

He is a board certified family physician and flight surgeon. At the time of his selection, he was serving in the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne).

Jessica Watkins

This Colorado native earned a Bachelor’s degree in Geological and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University, and a Doctorate in Geology from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

She enjoys soccer, rock climbing, skiing and creative writing.

After completing two years of training, the new astronaut candidates could be assigned to missions performing research on the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft built by commercial companies, and launching on deep space missions on our new Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

The ultimate masterpost

**This is a list of helpful sites pulled from multiple masterposts. I will be updating this as I find new things.** 

IMPORTANT!!!!!!!!! I KNOW THE LINKS AREN’T SHOWING UP IF ANYONE ON HERE KNOWS WHY THAT IS PLEASE TELL ME ASAP! IF YOU GO AND EDIT THE POST SO FAR IT SHOWS THE LINKS BUT I HAVE NO IDEA WHY THEY WILL NOT SHOW UP ON THE ACTUAL POSTS

**If something doesn’t work let me know.** Thank you!

**If something belongs to you and you want credit let me know. I tried to make all the links go to a specific site. But I’m happy to give you credit if you see something that connect back to you.**

SAT/ACT

ACT Masterpost
FREE MATERIAL
Vocab

AP’s Non-Specific 

For every high school student studying an AP test 
FREE MATERIAL (some SAT/ACt stuff too)
Study guides

AP’s Specific

Art History
Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history
Course-notes
Barrons pdfs

Biology
AP Biology Exam Guide
Chapter Review
Giant Review Sheet
Crash Course 

Calculus AB & BC
Cheatsheet (AB & BC)
Stuff You MUST Know Cold for AP Calc (AB)
If you see that, do this (AB)

Chemistry
AP Chemistry Notes
Podcasts
Quick Review
Periodic Table

Comparative Government and Politics
Government Comparisons
Cramsheet
Study Sheet (opens as word doc)

Computer Science
Review: Part 1

English Language
Rhetorical Strategies
AP Language Review

Environmental Science
Vocab to Know
Tips
APES Review

European History
STUDY GUIDES
Exam Review Sheets
Tom Richey 

French Language
Cram packet

Human Geography
Course-notes

Macroeconomics
Every Graph You Need To Know (YouTube)
Cram packet

Microeconomics
Study guide

Psychology 
sparknotes study guide
hella good review sheets
ton of flashcards woah
mind map of social psych
rough outline of the year
psychologists to know
crash course ~ hank green
intro to psych post
free textbook resources
study playlists help u
bunch of review materials
very good cram packet
lots of notes from a post
outline of erikson’s theory
mind map of disorders
how to stay motivated!!

Physics B & C
Equations (C Mech)
Unit Notes ©
Unit Notes ©
Equations © 

Statistics
Cram packet
Inference Procedures
AP Stats formulas

U.S. Government
Cheat Sheet
Review Materials
Tom Richey 

U.S. History
Cram Packet: part 1, part 2
The Giant AHAP Review
Unit study guides
Quizlet sets
The Comprehensive AP US History Study Guide
The man that saved me Part 1 Part 2

World History
Cram Packets and Review Sheets
Cram packets by era
Course-notes

General Subject’s

English Help
Cliffsnotes
Sparknotes
No Fear Shakespeare
How to Write a Essay (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)
What makes a good Essay
How to Edit Yourself
Editing Checklist
Trouble Reading? Tips (X) (X) (X)
Writing Masterpost (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)
Other things to help your Writing  (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X) (X)

Languages 
Duolingo
Achieving Proficiency

Math Help
Mathway (type in your problem and it solves it)
Square Root Calculator
Cube Root Calculator
Expression Simplifier
Helps you with Math
Easy unit converter
Any calculator you need
Algebra Solver
Scientific Calculator 
Cheat Sheet 

Science Help
All about space
Guides for more than 5,500 animal species
Improve you Geography knowledge
vast collection of historic images and videos
Symbols and their meanings
Comprehensive site for genetics and evolution
Lectures 
Lab Write Ups

Writing Help
Free Microsoft Word Equivalent
Writing Software Master post
Cant Remember A Word?
Bibliography Maker
Social Media Citation Guide
Earn A Cute Picture Of A Kitten For Writing
Writers Block?
Check Your Writing for Spelling and Grammatical Errors
Coffee Shop Sounds
Essay Structure Guide
Want To Know Who You Write Like?
Remember the Word
Alternatives to Said
Great Inspiration
Getting Inspired
Free Microsoft Word alternative
Dealing with writer’s block
Lay vs. lie
When to change paragraphs
Music for writing
Research and reading
How to write a kickass essay with ½ of the stress
How to write an essay
Guide to writing a basic essay
Essay writing: the basics
What makes a good essay?
How to google? (1) (2)
Writing tips
Harvard Writing Resources
Synonyms Masterpost
can’t find the right word?
Hemingway an online editor (It’s awesome)

Other Useful Stuff 

Citing
Bibme
Son of Citation Machine
Owl Purdue
How to write Bibliography

College tips
make a to do+doing+done board (I just did this and it is very helpful)
print sources nicely (1) (2)
recipes based on ingredients - recipepuppy
popular new headlines - newsmap.jp
ted.com
speed read - spreeder.com
white noise - simplynoise.com
plan sleep time - sleepyti.me
google like a boss - png / jpg
planetebook.com/ebooks 
readanybook.com
prezi.com 
collegepackinglist.com
Tips for college freshman
Know before college 
Preparing for a lecture

Productivity 
30/30 (app)
Essential productivity apps for any student*
Top 5 productivity apps for iOS (video)*
Top 5 productivity apps for Android (video)*
StayFocusd
Time Warp
Self Control (mac) blocks websites
The science of productivity (video)
The science of procrastination and how to manage it (video)
7 brain hacks to improve your productivity (video)
The simple science of getting more done (in less time)
Productivity tips
About power naps
How to pull an all-nighter effectively

Studying (Currently long but I will sort through at a later point)
Answering multiple choice questions
Apps for students
Basics for Efficient Studying
BBC Bitesize
Calculators
Check spelling and grammar
Coffitivity- sounds of a cafe
Convert Anything To Anything
Cornell note taking method
Coursera- Online courses for free.
Create flowcharts, network diagrams, ect.
Creating Effective Exam Cheat Sheets
Defeating Procrastination
Essay writing
Exam survival tips
Finals Help Guide
Finals survival guide
Flashcards
Free Flashcards Study Helper
Free online courses
Google books for research
Grammar Check
Guide on punctuation
Homework Help
How to answer exam questions
How to Read a Textbook
How to Review in Less Time
How to study
How to survive finals
How to take notes Masterpost
How to Underline/Highlight Effectively
How to write an essay
Inkflow Visual Notebook
Khan Academy- Learn anything.
Learning how to study
Making a good study guide
Memorizing dates
Momentum- Be motivated and organised.
Note taking like a pro
Notetaking Strategies
Online calculator
Online Ruler
open2study- Free online study for everyone.
Presentation Zen- A blog that helps you with your presentations.
Productive Study Break Tips
Pull an All Nighter & Do Well On Your Exam
Quizlet- Make flashcards and test yourself.
Reading Review, Highlighting, and Underlining
Research & Reading Tips
Scholarpedia
School survival guide
Science simplified
Simple and Not So Simple Proven Ways to Sharpen Memory
Solving Problems vs. Practicing Them 
Studyblue 
StudyBlue- Make online flashcards.
Studying for an important exam
Study Playlist 
Superb Study Guides and Mini Moleskines
Taking Notes Effectively and Practically
Test-taking Strategies
Test your vocabulary
The Benefits of Active Notetaking
The “Secret” to Doing Well in School
Thinking & Memorizing Tips
Time management
Tips and trick to help you get good grades
Triaging Your Assignments
Useful websites
Website Blocker- Remove temptation.
What NOT To Do When Studying
Wikiversity
Wolfram Alpha for research 
Youtube Crash Course
“Academic Disaster Insurance”
“Big Idea” Flashcards

Textbooks
Free textbooks
Text Book Nova
Textbooks
Textbooks  
Ebookee
Reddit
BookFinder
Medical Textbooks
Cookbooks to Text Books
Science/Math Textbooks
Business Textbooks
Tech Books
Greek and Roman Text in English
Art Books
Historical Fiction
History Books
Project Gutenberg
Bookbyte
Free Ebooks
Books
Books
Books
Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic Books
Classic books and Reference and study guides
Classic books
Free Textbook Download Masterpost
Textbook Guide

Organization
My Study Life - It’s a planner to help you remember when your homework is due and stuff like that
Free printable planner
To do list
How to make a study schedule
Class folder organization
“Study Cove” Organization
Making a Detailed Study Schedule
The Work-Progress Journal
Quick Tip for Flashcard Organization
Scheduling Organization
College Plan Spreadsheet Template
Organizing Your Notes
Getting Yourself Together in College with Mental Illness
How to Organize Your Workspace

Stress Reliefs/Relaxng
stress analyst - relaxonline
calm.com
distract yourself
self-care tips
self-care for overstimulated nerves
softest legs
feel better
Thoughts Room
Panic & Anxiety Masterpost
Guided Relaxation
Stress Relievers
Chill Playlist
Cute Videos
The quiet place project
Feelings Masterpost

Useful Stuff
plan, budget, and manage daily finances
How to take a Standardized Test
How to Master Excel
Fact check politicians
Back to school Masterpost
What you didn’t learn in high school

IDK what to put these under but they're helpful too
Check The Safety Of Any Website
Download From 8tracks
Print Webpages Without the Clutter
Is This Website Down For Me Or Everyone?
Self Defense Tips
Chrome Extension Tells You Which Tab Is Playing Music
Prevent Hangovers
Bookmark Online Videos
1 Month Free of Amazon Prime
Netflix Recommendations
Becoming An Adult Masterpost
All The Audios You’ve Ever Reblogged
Stream/Watch Free TV/Movies
Never Hit A Dead End With A Broken Link
Downloadable PDF To-Do Lists
Watch Musicals
List Of Universities On Tumblr
Summer Studying
Back to School

Scholarship Masterpost

8/17/2015: Updated some parts. Alphabetized the study section and added in new links. If at any point you want something added in that isn’t here just send me an ask or submit it in the submit box.

6/1/2016: Currently working on the issue of the links disappearing. Hopefully I’ll have it fixed 

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

Get the latest on women making history at NASA, our Juno mission, the Curiosity rover and move!

1. Women at NASA Making History, Creating the Future

Throughout Women’s History Month, we’ve been presenting profiles of the women who are leading the way in deep space exploration.

+ Meet some of them

2. Juno and the Giant

Our Juno spacecraft made its fifth close flyby over giant Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops.

+ See the latest from the King of Planets

3. When the Road Gets Rough, the Tough Keep Rolling

A routine check of the aluminum wheels on our Curiosity Mars rover has found two small breaks on the rover’s left middle wheel tread–the latest sign of wear and tear as the rover continues its journey, now approaching the 10-mile (16 kilometer) mark. But there’s no sign the robotic geologist won’t keep roving right through its ongoing mission.

+ Get the full report

4. What Do Mars and Dinosaurs Have in Common?

Our research reveals that volcanic activity at the giant Martian volcano Arsia Mons ceased about 50 million years ago, around the time of Earth’s Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction, when large numbers of plant and animal species (including dinosaurs) went extinct. However, there’s no reason to think the two events were more than a cosmic coincidence.

+ Learn how scientists pieced together the past

5. A Comet in Commotion

Images returned from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission indicate that during its most recent trip through the inner solar system, the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place – full of growing fractures, collapsing cliffs and massive rolling boulders.

+ See the many faces of Comet #67P

6. Next Generation Space Robot is Ingenious, Versatile–and Cute

The next rovers to explore another planet might bring along a scout. The Pop-Up Flat Folding Explorer Robot (PUFFER) in development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was inspired by origami. Its lightweight design is capable of flattening itself, tucking in its wheels and crawling into places rovers can’t fit.

+ Meet PUFFER

7. Shadowy Dawn

According to data from our Dawn mission to Ceres, shadowed craters on the dwarf planet may be linked to the history of how the small world has been tilted over time by the gravity of planets like Jupiter.

+ Find out how understanding “cycles of obliquity” might solve solar system mysteries

8. On Orbit and Online

We’re developing a  long-term technology demonstration project of what could become the high-speed internet of the sky. The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will help engineers understand the best ways to operate laser communications systems, which could enable much higher data rates for connections between spacecraft and Earth, such as scientific data downlink and astronaut communications.

+ See how it will work

9. A Big Role for Small Sats in Deep Space Exploration

We selected 10 studies to develop mission concepts using CubeSats and other kinds of very small satellites to investigate Venus, Earth’s moon, asteroids, Mars and the outer planets. “These small but mighty satellites have the potential to enable transformational science,” said Jim Green, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division.

+ Get the small details

10. Rings Around the Red Planet?

It’s possible that one of our closest neighbors had rings at one point – and may have them again someday. At least, that’s the theory put forth by NASA-funded scientists at Purdue University.

+ See more details about the once and future rings of Mars

Discover more lists of 10 things to know about our solar system HERE.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

writing an essay in college is very different from writing an essay in high school. personally, i write more research/history papers than literary essays (the liberal arts life and curse), so this is going to be a post on how a general research-y essay that has a thesis and arguments. 

intro

  • don’t open with a quote and don’t be overly broad. 
  • avoid generalizations 
  • your intro should address the topic of your essay (ex. the significance of gardens in renaissance society), and then narrow down to what you want to talk about in regards to your topic (ex. the political influence of the Medici gardens during the renaissance)
  • thesis! it should include the argument you want to make about the narrowed down topic, and three (or however many your class requires) reasons to support it. I like to think of it as W = X + Y + Z. 
  • your thesis explains who, what and why in a concise manner. 

body

  • topic sentences should not be a word for word copy of your thesis.
  • the order of arguments in your thesis is the order of your paragraphs 
  • depending on the length of your essay, there should be at least two justifications to your argument. 
  • so, just as the intro has a formula, X = A + B, and so forth. 
  • A and B should be backed up with some sources/quotes. don’t forget that if you are quoting from class notes to put either the prof’s last name, or (class notes)
  • be sure to have clear and concise arguments, don’t be flowery
  • USE WORDS THAT ARE ACCURATE. thesaurus is great but if you use a word that sounds cool but doesn’t capture the meaning you want to convey then don’t use it, because it may just change the meaning of your argument
  • quote whatever isn’t yours. it is completely fine if 90% of your sentences are quotes. its weird to get used to, but don’t worry about it. 

conclusion

  • the worst part in my opinion. 
  • synthesize don’t summarize. show how your arguments relate back to the thesis.
  • try not to copy paste your thesis into the conclusion, word it so that the readers understands that through XYZ, you were able to conclude and support argument W (referring back to the thesis formula)
  • do not add any new information, do not add quotes. 
  • your final sentence should tie up the essay in a pretty bow, but try to avoid clichés 

protips

  • when writing the body paragraphs, your ‘weakest’ paragraph should be in the middle, strongest as your last, and the second best as your first.
  • if you’re stumped on the intro, skip it. write out the body first, then the intro and you’ll be able to concisely word your thesis
  • think of your essay as an infomercial. your intro is the loud and clear HERES MY PRODUCT, the body is blasting information on why the product is so cool, and the conclusion is the final push for the viewer to buy that product. make your teacher want to agree with your thesis! 
  • use a mix of paraphrase and quotes!
  • don’t forget your works cited lmao (the MLA Handbook is a gr8 tool, also OWL Purdue)
  • prime time for essay writing is in the morning or at night, but make sure you edit it meticulously 
  • EDIT ON PAPER NOT ON YOUR SCREEN

stay humble, study hard 

This City Never Sleeps

Word Count: 3421

Pairing: Eventual Peter Parker x Female!Reader

Requested: Nope

Warnings: Light cursing.

Summary: You learn Peter’s secret, and it doesn’t take long for him to learn yours.

Note: This is really reader-heavy. but I really felt that in order to move on in this verse I had to develop that character and her relationships with the other characters. So, sorry if you wanted more Peter, but I promise there will be more of him in future installments. Also this is the most self-indulgent thing I’ve ever written in my life.


“(Y/N)! Has Peter told you about his new internship yet?” Ned asked excitedly, sitting down at your usual lunch table. Peter wasn’t there yet, but that wasn’t abnormal. He had chemistry before lunch and had recently taken to spending some extra time in the lab before coming to eat.

“No,” you said. “I haven’t really seen him yet today.”

“Oh, man, I don’t want to spoil it for you but it is crazy!” Ned said.

Keep reading

college advice part 2/7 : how to approach a competitive university

→ these are just tips based on what i’ve learned at uni!!

  • research ruthlessly. don’t just focus on the number of acceptances; look at the field you want to go into as well! look at what the environment is like, what the school does for it’s students, how many of those students go on to be successful in their careers. look at all of these things and more. the list is endless of things to consider depending on your field of study and interests: research opportunities, volunteering, clubs, sports, etc.
  • tell yourself that state schools are just a good as competitive and selective universities. this is important. because this is true. state schools are just as good as competitive and selective universities. you’ll get a wonderful education no matter where you go. my father has always told me that i should go to a state school for undergrad and a top notch university for grad school, so that’s what i’ve been doing.
  • ask yourself why you want to go to such a competitive university. is it because you just want it to look good on your resume or are you really looking to be challenged and pushed beyond your limits? state schools are also very challenging. i happen to go to a state school (purdue university in indiana) and i am challenged heavily here. even though it’s not an ivy league, i still feel as though i’m not getting a free pass through all my classes. i still have to work for my grades and i study so much and i still fail sometimes. i think this also relates to what my father has said; if you’re going to go to an ivy league for undergrad, where are you gonna go for grad school that’s gonna look better than your undergrad?
  • find something that makes you stick out from the rest of the people applying. find something unique about yourself! i am 9235% sure that the only reason that i was able to get into one of the most competitive fields of study at purdue university is because of what i shared during my application process. something that made me stick out. there are loADS of things that you can talk about to make yourself stick out! here are some ideas: talk about your study abroad if you had the opportunity to do so, any special events that you planned or coordinated for your clubs or extracurriculars, if you were the captain of any sports teams, any internships or volunteer opportunities you took, etc. there’s so many things!! there must be something that not everyone in your school has done!!
  • visit the university!! see some professors if you can, sit in on some classes if you wish. just do something to see exactly what it’s like. i ended up going to a state school (and i’m still here ofc), BUT i’m already in contact with some people at various universities for grad school. make!! connections!! connections are key to advancing your career!! i managed to get into a pretty sweet program over the summer for an internship that wouldn’t otherwise have been possible if i hadn’t had the connections i did!
  • push yourself. whether you’re in high school or a transfer student. push yourself in terms of academics, but please do not risk your health. get that 4.0 in high school. graduate at the top of your class, in the top 20, the top 10, the top 5. put all the effort you can and want to into your clubs + extracurriculars. break your own personal records in your sport. try to break everyone else’s. but keep in mind that your health is also SO important. do not lose your sanity over trying to get into the #1 university in the country. just be you and continue trying to improve. because that’s what colleges want to see: your improvement, your dedication and loyalty, your leadership. this is what colleges look for.
  • once again, tell yourself that competitive and selective schools are not any better than state schools, community colleges, etc.

travellerterrace  asked:

Hey there. I notice I have a massively bad writing habit. My sentences tend to start with the subject at the very beginning, meaning the POV character or a pronoun tends to start 90% percent of my sentences. (Ex. "He glanced outside. He had things to do today"). I want to break this bad habit, but can't find any info to help me! Think you guys can help?

Good news! You’re not alone! In fact, there are whole guides out there that teachers use to try to help their students kick this exact habit. (This one is very useful if you feel like you don’t have a great grip on the different ways a sentence CAN be structured, although it will also make you feel like you are taking a 9th grade standardized test.) It’s not as generative as a creative person like me prefers, but it does get me thinking very concretely about what makes a sentence, why I’m choosing the structures I’m choosing, and how I might change that).

Unfortunately, that is my first advice. Some people have a natural feel for sentence rhythm and don’t need to know all the technicalities in order to structure a gorgeous, varied paragraph, but the rest of us tend to benefit from sitting down and doing sentence diagrams.

After you’ve done that, my next big recommendation is this: set your paragraph aside. Stick it in your desk drawer, hide it under your pillow, give it to your cat, minimize the window, whatever you have to do to not be looking at it. Open up a new blank page. Write the paragraph again, from memory. Now that you have gotten the ideas down once, I’ll bet you anything that your sentences come out more natural and less stilted.

If that’s not working for you, you can try what they’ve done over at OWL at Purdue (a great resource for all kinds of technical writing help, by the way) and just write a single sentence in as many ways as possible. Try ten on the first sentence you practice with. See if you can work your way up to being able to spit out 15 or 20. Most of these are gonna be bad, as you can see by the examples on OWL. This exercise is not about writing good sentences necessarily, it’s about figuring out every single way you can possible say a thing so that you get familiar with the huge variety of options open to you. When you’ve done this a few times (and also given yourself a rest), see if the paragraph rewrite trick goes any better.

Central Indiana gothic

- no matter where you are, you can hear the sounds of race cars zooming by every year during the indy 500
- “I’m from carmel,” they say. you back away slowly
- your dreams are haunted by the voices of courtney cole and monica peck the sisters of savings from hare chevrolet. you have never gone a day without hearing them
- somehow a mike pence must go sign ended up in your front yard. you’re not sure how it got there, but you’re not going to move it
- every time you refer to I-69, someone, somewhere, snickers
- every time it rains, chuck lofton and randy ollis get stronger
- a performer announces that they’ve got a show in indianapolis. you wonder what they want from you
- you have never understood the purdue vs IU rivalry, but damned if you wouldn’t kill for one or the other
- things haven’t been the same since tony dungy left. everyone knows it but no one talks about it

3

Ladies and gentlemen, I’d like to introduce you to tired college freshman in his moose pajamas, Neil Armstrong. The dorms were full that year, so he ended up living in a house in North street with a few other guys. In the top image, he has what appears to be a ripped piece of construction paper in a slide rule that he is flying around like an airplane. The second and third are pretty self explanatory, and are absolutely adorable.
Photos courtesy of the amazing folks at the Purdue Archives and Special Collections.

Indiana

Summary: One argument leads to another. Billy betrays his childhood sweetheart’s trust. 

Authors Note: Written with the song Konstantine by Something Corporate in mind. 

REQUESTS OPEN

I like song requests like this one, I can just kinda write as it comes to me instead of trying to go off a promt.

FEEDBACK ALWAYS APPRECIATED, ESPECIALLY IF YOU DIDNT LIKE IT. I always strive to make my work better (seriously, you can roast me if you want to )

Keep reading

college advice part 5/7 : buying textbooks

→ these are just tips based on what i’ve learned at uni!!

  • buy the books for classes you know you’ll not do well in. i didn’t know if i’d need my physics book for class or not, but i knew that i would struggle in it, so i got it anyways! it ended up that i needed it anyways, but i wanted it for supplemental reading material regardless of the requirement or not.
  • wait until you get the syllabus OR the professor tells you if you’ll need the textbook for classes that you are familiar with and have a history of doing well in. they’ll usually tell you during the first class if you’ll need the textbook or not! for my gen chem class, i didn’t use the textbook at all; my professor told us at the beginning that we wouldn’t need it unless we wanted it as supplemental material. same for my first bio class in college. but my physics class required the book, so i got it.
  • do not buy textbooks brand new, or at all, unless you know you’ll need them for you entire college career! rent your books!! it’s so much cheaper and odds are you won’t need them for longer than 1 semester. i have never outright bought a book for any class in uni until this semester where i bought my organic chemistry textbook, used, from eBay. i bought it because that’s what i want to study in grad school so it’s gonna be useful in the long run. but other than that one, i’ve never bought a textbook for math, physics, english, etc. i’ve always rented them because i get some pretty sweet deals from amazon as a purdue student!
  • find cheap places to get textbooks! some professors will tell you to get old versions because they’re cheaper, but try to find the cheapest copy possible if you can. most of the time, you can actually find old versions on the internet for free; if you’re okay with reading off a computer screen, then you might want to do this if you have to pay for textbooks. i’m lucky enough to have my parents help in paying for mine. check out these posts for some more information on where to get textbooks for cheap or free: