wile e. coyote and road runner

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Looney Tunes (1994-) #236

Are you ready to open your heart and fall in love? All your favorites are, and they’re doing it on television as contestants on “Single Mingle,” the show that finds love for the super-attractive yet strangely available. Daffy Duck, Yosemite Sam and Porky Pig have made it to the finals, but to win the bachelorette’s heart they’ll have to navigate dates, future in-laws and each other. - $2.99

1) Looney Tunes - Single Mingle - 8 pages
2) Tweety & Sylvester - Behind The Slapstick! - 6 pages
3) Elmer Fudd & Taz - Goin’ Native - 6 pages

Looney Tunes: Greatest Hits Vol. 2: You’re Despicable!

Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Taz, Tweety Bird, and all your other favorite Looney Tunes stars are here in this grand slam collection of their wildest, wackiest, and dare we say LOONIEST comic book adventures! Will Wile E Coyote finally catch the Road Runner? Will Pepé Le Pew get the girl? Don’t miss the second collection of all the greatest moments from these classic characters!
Available on March 28 2017 - $10.99

Looney Tunes (1994-) #237

Duck Dodgers has always been the 24-½ century’s greatest hero—until today! His faithful partner, Eager Young Space Cadet, was just promoted to the rank of Commander, placing Dodgers in unfamiliar territory. As the new Commander takes the conn, their new mission is to go beyond Planet X to discover…Planet Y! Will they uncover the universe’s greatest secrets, or will Dodgers become the Uneager Old Space Curmudgeon and steer them off course?
Available on May 24 2017 - $2.99

Looney Tunes (1994-) #235

Porky hits the hilltop to be one with nature…until Daffy Duck moves in next door. Instead of peace and quiet, he gets heavy metal music and massive explosions from Daffy’s dynamite collection. Needless to say, th-th-th-that’s not all, folks! - $2.99

1) Porky Pig & Daffy Duck - His And Hermit - 8 pages
2) Bugs Bunny & Daffy Duck - Barbecue Bunny - 1 page
3) Bugs Bunny & Daffy Duck - Storm Warning - 1 page
4) Daffy Duck as Duck Twacy - A Vase In The Crowd - 10 pages

LOONEY TUNES - Whitman bagged comics ad

Shroud of Mystery #1 Whitman (Western Publishing) 1982

bowlerhatwearer  asked:

So if Bendy was probably the "Villian" in the old Cartoons, then why would his Face appear on the Cans of Bacon Soup. I mean wouldn't it then kind of better to have the "Hero" on the cover of the food to appeal to the customers. The only thing I could thought about is that maybe becaus Bendy is the most famous of the Cartoon Characters.

I think Bendy was more of… a stinker, than actual villain.

I’d still call him a villain because I would imagine he did serious villainy stuff, like I dunno, trying to trick people out of their souls, monkey’s paw kind of stuff - writing up contracts then showing the newly contracted the damning fine print or twisting the meaning, trying to drag sinners into hell, general attempted murder - maybe even following orders given to him by the devil himself maybe earlier on before he was established as an impudent little guy (like, I could imagine a pilot for the show beginning this way or something, but maybe never after the first episode haha).

But my guess is that while their designs are clearly old Disney/Fleischer Studios based, they probably took a form more similar to something ChuckJones/Tex Avery. ya know, Looney Tunes.

How many times did Bugs Bunny get a kick out of putting someone in mortal danger? And he’s undoubtedly the star of Looney Tunes. Bugs is a protagonist but I don’t think anyone would call him a hero. Wile E. Coyote was the villain, but he just wanted a meal, the Road Runner is the one that always made a fool of him. As much as I assume Bendy was certainly a villain, I think he also probably went around pokin’ people in the kiesters with a pitchfork, pulling humiliating pranks, cheating people out of something a little less high-stakes than a soul, and being in big trouble himself when his plans backfire.

That said it’s not just Warner Bros. who have a hold on this stuff. I think I remember that Mickey did his fair share of screwing with his foes. MGM, Hanna-Barbera, Harvey Comics, I think we end up defaulting to Disney which had a lot of big-eyed victims and deceitful villains, but cartoons have always been full of moral flip-flopping, and main characters that are willing to do bad things, because that’s how you get a joke. It’s easy to find humor there, or rather to write humorous sequences.

I think Bendy was probably a lot more genuinely villainous than Bugs Bunny is thought of as being (to Looney Tunes fans, I’m absolutely sure Bugs has gotten downright diabolical, but for the sake of this argument - it’s true I believe that he’s not really thought of as a ‘villain’.)

But I would put some money on the idea that he was a lot more like Bugs than he is like, say, Natasha Fatale & Boris Badenov.

And anyway, maybe there’s a reason why there’s so much bacon soup lying around… Might be that Boris’s face is the one on the sweet snack cakes. Bendy’s face might be on the soup, but nobody said it was a smart marketing choice!

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Layout drawings by Chuck Jones for his 1961 “Compressed Hare”, graphite on 12 field animation paper. The nine rules for the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner cartoons. (Although, “Compressed Hare” starred Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote.)

1.    THE ROAD RUNNER CANNOT HARM THE COYOTE EXCEPT BY GOING “BEEP BEEP!”

2.    NO OUTSIDE FORCE CAN HARM THE COYOTE—ONLY HIS OWN INEPTITUDE OR THE FAILURE OF THE ACME PRODUCTS.

3.    THE COYOTE COULD STOP ANYTIME—IF HE WERE NOT A FANATIC. (REPEAT: “A FANATIC IS ONE WHO REDOUBLES HIS EFFORT WHEN HE HAS FORGOTTEN HIS AIM.”—GEORGE SANTAYANA

4.    NO DIALOGUE EVER, EXCEPT “BEEP BEEP!”

5.    THE ROAD RUNNER MUST STAY ON THE ROAD—OTHERWISE, LOGICALLY, HE WOULD NOT BE CALLED ROAD RUNNER.

6.    ALL ACTION MUST BE CONFINED TO THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE TWO CHARACTERS—THE SOUTHWEST AMERICAN DESERT.

7.    ALL MATERIALS, TOOLS, WEAPONS, OR MECHANICAL CONVENIENCES MUST BE OBTAINED FROM THE ACME CORPORATION.

8.    WHENEVER POSSIBLE, MAKE GRAVITY THE COYOTE’S GREATEST ENEMY.

9.    THE COYOTE IS ALWAYS MORE HUMILIATED THAN HARMED BY HIS FAILURES.

cbros5  asked:

Isn't it rather pointless and naive to have Superman continue to extend the olive branch to Luthor even when he and the audience know nothing will come of it and Luthor will always be a villain?

Yeah, that’s a fair question. You’d think after the 8th or 9th death ray or earthquake machine, he’d start thinking that while Lex isn’t a lost cause - Superman doesn’t tend to believe in those - he’s not particularly likely to turn over a new leaf either, and that actively hoping he wakes up and sees the light one day is just torturing himself.

Beyond that emotional investment though, what does it cost him? It’d be one thing if he was letting Lex go out of faith that this time he’ll surely clean up his act, but Superman’s still going after him and fighting everything he throws his way. He just thinks their war is stupid and pointless, and that there’s better things they could be doing with their lives. And that there is, in fact, a possibility that Lex could one day see it that way himself.

Not that this applies to every version of the character. Expecting the Golden Age Lex to reform would be like expecting Wile E. Coyote to stop chasing Road Runner. And the Byrne-era Lex - who literally considered himself a god and openly regarded humanity as barely-sentient insects fit only for grovelling at his feet as pitifully as they could manage, hating Superman purely because he found the idea of someone trying to stop him from tormenting, humiliating and murdering whoever he wanted whenever he wanted to be an almost inconceivably disgusting moral offense - was probably never going to see the light one day and turn his mighty intellect to helping mankind (especially since at the time his thing was primarily being business-smart rather than science-smart). But I hardly think it’s a coincidence that those are by far the least interesting takes on him: at his best, yes, Lex is a monster by any measure, but he’s also complicated. There is something there to dig out of him beyond the animal impulse to conquer and annihilate.

The thing with Lex - and yes, I realize it’s been repeated ad nauseum and boiled down to a misleading one-line summation of his character, same as it’s impossible to suppress an eye-roll at this point when someone calls Joker an “agent of chaos” however accurate it may be - is that he really does think he’s the hero, however much he’s deluding himself. Back in the Silver Age, for all the gags that he just hated Superboy for turning him bald, it’s clear reading that original story that he was a profoundly lonely kid desperate for friendship and respect, and that when it seemed his hero and only friend betrayed him out of jealousy at the moment of his greatest triumph, it shattered him beyond recognition into the man he becomes; hence the Bronze Age Luthor of Maggin and Bates who hated Superman but had nothing against mankind in general and was entirely capable of love even though he was ultimately ruled by his hate, or the Birthright Lex whose every act of spite was nakedly driven by a crushing sense of rejection. Or the modern Lex who convinces himself he’s humanity’s champion against an ubermensch whose very existence undoes our meaning as a species, even if he could care less for mankind and clearly is more concerned with his own value or lack thereof as the Greatest Man Of All Time.

That he’s capable of being salvaged is obviously a tougher proposition with the contemporary take; if nothing else, the one man above all others Superman thinks of as redeemable being a billionaire white guy is increasingly sketchy, especially when you factor in that the “people will wither and die with outside help, they need to learn to strive for greater things themselves” argument is something we hear these days less in relation to Superman, and more in relation to why poor people don’t deserve insurance. But it comes down to two things in particular that I think it makes sense Superman sees something in him:

1. Much as Lex is lying to himself about why he does what he does, he at least feels some kind of genuine need to justify himself. He doesn’t just go around destroying the world in his power armor the way 90% of the other villains Superman deals with do, or consider the concept of acting on principle towards a greater good to be a delusion for the little people; he’s constructed an incredibly elaborate, almost internally consistent set of self-justifications for why he’s still a good man in spite of all he’s done, and he believes he’ll actively work to improve the lives of others once Superman’s not ‘in the way’. The takeaway being that on some level, he wants to be a good man, if not as much as he wants to satisfy his own ego.

2. He wants to be loved. That’s often wrapped up with a desire to be outright worshiped, but as much as he may look down on his fellow man, he desperately craves acceptance and validation. It’s the great unspoken commonality of almost every major take on the character, whether he lashes out at Superman for seemingly betraying him, or for soaking up the love he wants for himself. Add the important note that most versions of him have at least one person he openly feels some kind of affection towards - typically either Lois or a version of Lena, or Clark himself once upon a time in some takes - suggesting that this sentiment at least somewhat extends beyond assuaging his own ego, and the concept that he could come to care about or at least acknowledge others doesn’t seem entirely like a pipe dream, however unlikely it may still be.

Arguments stemming from Lex’s personality aside though, Superman has other reasons for wanting to help him in particular. There’s of course the old idea that Lex could save the world in a way Superman never could, and there’s definitely truth to that; Lex IS smarter, and while Superman’s typically busy making sure the Galactic Golem doesn’t step on Metropolis, Lex has all the time in the world to cure cancer and take us to the stars, and serve as an example of practical and moral achievement to humanity, who doesn’t require superpowers to boot. Often - and I know I prefer it this way - Superman feels however irrationally responsible for Lex one way or another, whether because of his old friendship with Lex as Clark or Superboy going sour, or simply because his presence is what elevated Luthor to such heights of rage and desperation.

But most of all? I think Superman feels really, truly, completely uncondescendingly sorry for him. That Lex Luthor has spent his life so powerfully longing for something genuinely within his grasp - to change the world, and be respected for it - but wastes his life in pursuit of a selfish war he can never win, because he hates Superman so overpoweringly and because killing him would assure his own ascendance? That unlike so many of the people he fights - monsters who see human life as simple food, tyrants literally without the capacity to feel, authoritarians who make no bones about seeking conquest for its own sake - he wants love more than anything in the world, but lacks the self-awareness to realize it, or the empathy to feel it for or meaningfully from others? I think that would break Superman’s heart. I think that as much as he might be frustrated or enraged with Lex at a given moment, in the end every Kryptonite deathtrap and warped Bizarro clone and bid for the presidency and city-wrecking temper tantrum just makes Superman mourn for the person he could be all the more deeply. And because he sees that in him, and feels responsible for him, and knows Lex is one of the few people in the world who could talk with him on anything like the same level if they could just get along, and maybe above all else because he knows what it is to not quite be like anyone else but want to have a place among them, he can’t help but hope for Lex and try to draw that better person out of him. Because whether it’s naive to extend the olive branch or not, Superman lives forever in hope.