wildlife service

Cute alert! A baby mule deer tries catching a snowflake on its tongue at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Colorado. Mule deer are named for their oversized ears that resemble a mule’s ears. Compared to its cousin, the white-tailed deer, mule deer are larger in size, and have a black-tipped white tail and white patch on the rump. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The Trump administration is delaying listing this bumblebee as officially endangered

  • Last month, the rusty patched bumblebee became the very first species of bees in the continental U.S. to be officially marked as “endangered” by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • According to the Associated Press, the new designation was scheduled to go into effect on Friday, until the Trump administration delayed the move one day before.
  • The federal government announced the delay, which is in compliance with an order signed by Trump in January.
  • The regulation that would add the rusty patched bumblebee to the endangered species list, guaranteeing it federal protection, will be postponed until March 21.
  • According to the White House this will allow time for “reviewing questions of fact, law and policy they raise.” Read more (2/9/17 3:06 PM)

follow @the-future-now

instagram

Baby panda wants mail.

I’m devastated to learn that the white nose fungus has hit Minnesota bats in catastrophic levels this winter, with a population loss of 30-70% in some areas. The epidemic has killed millions of bats across the country, spreading from colony to colony and disturbing bats during hibernation so they use up their energy stores and freeze. Besides being precious amazing darling creatures who we should protect no matter what, bats contribute the equivalent of billions of dollars of pest control and pollination in the US, which hints at the real costs of policy decisions and budget cuts that neglect wildlife and take their services for granted.

Partly within the Los Angeles city limits, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area in California is home to a small population of mountain lions. National Park Service researchers have monitored more than 50 mountain lions in the park since 2002. Roaming freely, these big cats face unique challenges living so closely to urban areas. Photo by National Park Service.

2

This bumblebee is the first bee species in the continental US listed as “endangered”

  • The adorably named rusty patched bumblebee just became the first bee species in the contiguous United States to be officially categorized as “endangered” by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • Since the late 1990s, its population has shrunk by 87%, CNN reported.
  • “The rusty patched bumblebee is among a group of pollinators, including the monarch butterfly, experiencing serious declines across the country,” Tom Melius, the Wildlife Service’s midwest regional director, told CNN. Read more

follow @the-future-now

5

Fun Fact Friday: How Do You Survive in the Big Empty? These Lagomorphs Use Superpower Adaptations, of Course.

By Nancy Patterson, Public Affairs Specialist, Greater Sage-Grouse Rocky Mountain Region

It’s wide open in the Big Empty of sagebrush country. For the more than 350 species that live here, hiding spots are few and horizons are long. When you’re a favorite food of lots of predators you need special adaptations to survive. Lagomorphs are adaptation champs in this ecosystem. The term lagomorph describes mammals in the order of lagomorpha, better known as hares, rabbits, and pikas. In sagebrush country, some lagomorphs you might see are jackrabbits, cottontails, and pygmy rabbits.

Rabbits and hares have big eyes set on the sides of their heads. This gives them a wide viewpoint to look around for threats. Their large ears act like giant microphones to capture the slightest sound. And their long back feet act as a speedy superpower. With them they can spring into the air and dart quickly in a jig-jag pattern to escape predators. Jackrabbits can run at speeds of 40 miles per hour and their powerful hind legs can propel them in 10-foot leaps with each bound. Imagine trying to keep up with one of these athletic racers!

But, it’s tough to survive on big feet, eyes, and ears alone. It also helps to have superpower hiding adaptations. And rabbits and hares have some that act just like invisibility cloaks.

Keep reading

One of nature’s most social and playful creatures, river otters have big personalities and even bigger appetites. Often seen in groups, they can be observed hunting and frolicking year round at Loess Bluffs National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri. In winter, you might even catch them sliding across the ice on their bellies. Photo courtesy of Kenny Bahr.

By a largely party-line vote Tuesday, the Senate approved a bill that repeals Obama-era hunting restrictions on national wildlife refuges in Alaska. The House already voted last month to abolish those restrictions — which were instituted by the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2016 to protect predator species from hunters — and so the bill now heads to the desk of President Trump, who is widely expected to sign it.

The FWS rule facing repeal explicitly prohibited many kinds of “predator control” on the 16 federally owned refuges in Alaska. That prohibition included a ban on the aerial hunting, live trapping or baiting of predators such as bears and wolves — as well as on killing those predators while near their dens or their cubs.

Congress Rolls Back Obama-Era Rule On Hunting Bears And Wolves In Alaska

Image by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Organisation Generator

Was your character part of a noble military group at some point in their past? Perhaps they had an act in a wandering circus troupe? Or maybe they performed unspeakable deeds at the behest of a sinister religious organisation?
Perhaps you are a DM who has given your players a mysterious benefactor, but haven’t decided their true nature. Or maybe the Queen needs a group to call on to take care of these pesky adventurers who are threatening her plans!

Primary Purpose (1d10):

  1. Mercenary services
  2. Performing group
  3. Religious organisation
  4. Trading company
  5. Sailors
  6. Manufacturing or Farming
  7. Historians
  8. Medical assistance
  9. Wildlife exploration or expertise
  10. Magical services

Size (1d4):

  1. Diminutive: Five or fewer members
  2. Small: Fewer than twenty members
  3. Medium: Between twenty and one hundred members
  4. Large: Hundreds or thousands of members

Scrupulousness (1d6):

  1. Both lawful and good
  2. Willing to do anything for coin
  3. Willing to do anything to achieve a particular goal
  4. Lackadaisical but good intentioned
  5. Mischevious but not evil
  6. Outright evil; full on maniacal laughter type stuff

Signiature Feature (1d10):

  1. Members wear a uniforom
  2. Members recite a mantra or quote a manifesto
  3. Members’ bodies are decorated or altered in some way
  4. All members are of the same race
  5. Members carry a similar tool, weapon, or totem
  6. Members perform scheduled rituals
  7. Members have strict rules regarding speaking
  8. Prominent and recognizable iconography
  9. Accompanied by a particular type of animal
  10. All members are identical in every way

Leader Feature (1d10):

  1. Fearsome reputation
  2. Styled as a god
  3. Has never been seen
  4. Royalty
  5. Substance abuse issues
  6. Abnorbally large or small
  7. Recently deceased
  8. Eccentric
  9. Normal, down to earth person
  10. Actual god or demigod

I hope you have your representatives on speed-dial! Use that phone for some good.

The Endangered Species Act may be heading for the threatened list. This hearing confirmed it.

A Senate hearing to “modernize the Endangered Species Act” unfolded Wednesday just as supporters of the law had feared, with round after round of criticism from Republican lawmakers who said the federal effort to keep species from going extinct encroaches on states’ rights, is unfair to landowners and stymies efforts by mining companies to extract resources and create jobs.

The Endangered Species Act is a 43-year-old law enacted under the Nixon administration at a time when people were beginning to understand how dramatically chemical use and human development were devastating species. It has since saved the bald eagle, California condor, gray wolves, black-footed ferret, American alligator and Florida manatee from likely extinction.

But members of the hearing said its regulations prevented people from doing business and making a living. In a comment to a former U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service director who testified at the hearing, Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.), repeated a point made by Barrasso that of more than 1,600 species listed as threatened or endangered since the act’s inception, fewer than 50 have been removed.

An American bald eagle prepares to snag a perch in the prime fishing grounds below Conowingo Dam in Darlington, Md., in November 2012. (Linda Davidson/The Washington Post)

Highly intelligent and resourceful, raccoons are one of the most widespread mammals in North America. They have adapted to live in forests, mountain areas, coastal marshes and even urban centers. In Native American legends, they are known as tricksters and mischief-makers. Their characteristic masks and dexterous paws make them seem cute and approachable, but never forget that they are wild animals. Photo by Gary Miller, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The stillness of a winter sunrise is a moment to cherish at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Maine. Established in 1966, the refuge protects salt marshes and estuaries important for migrating birds. Stretching from the coast to inland forests, the refuge offers amazing views and wildlife watching on five excellent trails. Photo by Ward Feurt, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Along the Mississippi River Flyway in Iowa, Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge provides important habitat for migratory birds. Floodplains and forests are used by many wildlife species including migratory songbirds, waterfowl, hawks and eagles, deer, small mammals, reptiles and amphibians. After a recent snowstorm, it’s also a stunning winter sight. Photo by Jessica Bolser, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

2

Noman’s Land, or No Man’s Land, is a small island off the coast of Massachusetts. The tiny piece of land is located just about 3 miles south of Martha’s Vineyard. The public is banned from stepping foot on the island and no one has lived on it for over 60 years. Fish and Wildlife Services have asked that this island remains as a wildlife refuge and wants it to become federal wilderness which will grant it protection. 

The history of this island isn’t very well known. It used to be used as an aircraft test bombing site between 1943 to 1996. But before that ever happened, a single person used to live on the island. On one day in November in 1926, Joshua Crane saw something on his land he had never seen before. Etched into a stone were what seemed to be ancient Norse symbols. Crane managed to contact a photographer, Edward Gray, who was studying Norse voyages to the area and he went out to the island to see the rock. He took a few photos and sent them to an expert at Oslo University. Once deciphered, it was discovered to read “Liif Iriksson, MI.” - a famous name and the date 1001 in roman numerals. However it still is a mystery if Leif Erikson and his crew really did land on the island. 

I was telling my boyfriend about this and I decided that I had to make a post to introduce tumblr to Pedals the bear.

Pedals is a very special black bear because he always walks on his two hind legs and doesn’t like to use his front paws (bipedal, hence Pedals). A few years ago people started seeing him in and around my town and for a while no one was sure what the heck he was. Some people claimed that he was a man in a bear suit until people started capturing footage of him doing his thing. He became a local celebrity and NJ news networks started covering his appearances. 

People started worrying that he might be injured or a lost performing animal that wouldn’t be able to survive in the wilderness, so they called for an investigation from the local wildlife service to see if he needed to be taken into captivity. After monitoring him though, it became clear that Pedals taught himself how to do this due to an injury to his front paws when he was young, and continued to walk out of habit. He’s perfectly healthy and able to forage and be social with no problem, so he’s still free and wandering around my town. He has fans who follow his appearances and seeing him is a great surprise :]

Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge encompasses some of Alabama’s last remaining undisturbed coastal barrier habitat. The name Bon Secour is French for “safe harbor,” very appropriate considering the sanctuary it provides for native flora and fauna. This refuge is a natural oasis of wildlands, where wildlife can exist without harm. It may be too cold to go in the water, but even in winter, a walk on the beach can be a beautiful experience. Photo by Stephanie Pluscht, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

5

#350Species: Autumn in the Sagebrush Ecosystem

Like Greater sage-grouse, more than 350 species depend on the sagebrush ecosystem for their survival. People are one of them. We will be sharing an ongoing series that highlights the #350species, such as the many animals, plants, and insects that live on the range, that weaves our human stories and sense of place into this complex landscape.

Autumn in the sagebrush ecosystem is a time of transition for the millions of animals and birds migrating through and preparing for winter. Once spanning almost 300 million acres of North America (an area larger than Texas and California combined), habitat fragmentation, development, agricultural conversion, tree encroachment, invasive species like cheatgrass and resulting wildfires have caused the sagebrush ecosystem to shrink to approximately half its original size. As this crucial habitat shrinks and fragments, it becomes increasingly difficult for Greater sage-grouse and other sagebrush-dependent species to travel and survive on the range.

Greater sage-grouse, 350+ other species, and millions of people depend on the iconic sagebrush ecosystem for their survival. The BLM manages about 67 million acres of the remaining Greater sage-grouse habitat. These public lands connect to private, state, and federal lands across the range. Conserving such a large ecosystem and key species like the Greater sage-grouse truly requires an all hands, all lands approach. With this in mind, the BLM and partners are working together and with the Greater sage-grouse plans on efforts that sustain the sagebrush landscape and the many species who call it home. #350species

Story by Nancy Patterson, BLM Rocky Mountain Region

4

New Mexico Milkweed Project Helps Pollinators 

In response to the Federal pollinator strategy and the crisis in Monarch butterfly populations, the BLM New Mexico State Office and Taos Field Office recently collaborated with the National Park Service’s Southwest Exotic Plant Management Team (SWEPMT) to grow more than 10,000 milkweeds for pollinator habitat restoration projects across New Mexico. 

The effort began in 2015 via a cooperative agreement between the National Park Service (NPS) and Santa Ana Pueblo native plants nursery to start growing plants at their facility. The species include Antelope horns (Asclepias asperula), broadleaf milkweed (Asclepias latifolia), and showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa). The seeds came from sites across northern New Mexico and eastern Arizona via the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation in 2011. The Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Los Lunas Plant Materials Center grew three species from 2013-2015, and the three native species provided to the NPS were grown at a seed lot in 2015. 

Keep reading

Carouge à tête jaune  / Yellow-headed blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus).

Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus (Bonaparte, 1826) :
- Carouge à tête jaune ;
- Yellow-headed Blackbird ;
- Tordo cabeciamarillo ;
- Graúna-de-cabeça-amarela ;
- Ittero testagialla ;
- Gelbkopf-Schwarzstärling ;
- Geelkoptroepiaal ;
- keltahupputurpiaali ;
- Gulhuvad ängstrupial ;
- Желтоголовый трупиал ;
- żółtogłowiec ;
- キガシラムクドリモドキ ;
-  黄头黑鹂

Ordre : Passériformes - Passeriformes /
Famille : Ictéridés - Icteridae /
Genre : Xanthocephalus /
Espèce : xanthocephalus - Espèce monotypique /
Longévité : 10 ans.

Songbird / https://www.flickr.com/photos/50838842@N06/19864565935 / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters / (CC BY 2.0)

¤ ♥

http://mokacahuete.tumblr.com/