wilde-bookings

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‘The Picture of Earl Grey’ Tea Tins

Earl Grey Tea for your readings of ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ by Oscar Wilde

Shot by the amazingly talented EvieSEO

Dorian Gray Quote Tea Cup below by her too.

First published on susanisblogging.wordpress.com

So, I basically love reading everything. Literally everything. YA, contemporary, mystery, thriller, non fiction, literary fiction - but my honest to God first love with books is classics.

Although when I’ve got a huge TBR to tackle I tend to stay with quick, easy books, most of them new releases, I have a few classics that I keep going back to and that are easy to understand and always keep me engaged.

Jane Eyre

This is hands down one of my favourite books of all time. I was about 11 when I first read it, and I was struck by how normal  Jane  was, and how raw her emotions were. Because the narrative starts off when Jane is still a child, the language is much simpler, and only becomes slightly more complex when she reaches adulthood. The characters are well defined, the story is dramatic and iconic, and the feminist MC makes this a book I can just fly through in a couple of sittings.

Sense and Sensibility

Although I do love Pride and Prejudice, this Austen work is one that I completely fell in love with when I read it a few years ago. As it’s slightly lesser known than P&P, the plot is more of a surprise than expected and has wonderfully sassy female leads. Austen generally is very easy to understand and read given the time period in which she was writing, but the stories and characters are still wonderfully complex and engaging.

The Picture of Dorian Grey

Basically the gayest book ever written, with a wonderfully conceited MC. The writing is beautiful and poetic, but Wilde never obscures his meaning with over flowery language, only adds to it. Although the text is more dense than some of the others on this list, the book is much shorter with (sometimes) better pacing.

1984

Although this is such an iconic book with a constantly referenced premise (Big Brother, anyone?), the plot is still thrilling and surprising, with succinct but well crafted prose. As it’s set in what designed to be a dystopian future, it’s so easy to get lost in the sinister society Orwell creates in this surprisingly short book.

Little Women

Despite being a fairly hefty book, because this novel is aimed at a younger audience the language and plot are a breeze to get through. I adored this book when I was still in primary and I adore it even more now; I immediately connected with all the sisters, and their first Christmas in the book is so pure and lovely that this is such an escapist book to me. What I love is that it’s not all twee, either - tragedy does strike, and the drama is so real and personal.

Hearing Colin talk about the Hook backstory has me both excited and nervous.

Given that he hinted it would impact relationships combined with filming and Emilie talking about learning about Belle’s roots I gotta say I am leaning toward bumpy seas for Captain Book. It’s one of the few relationships the show has worked to develop with Hook and one I think he values.