wildcards

nytimes.com
The Democrats Win the Summer
But it may not matter which party had the better convention.
By David Brooks

It could be that in this moment of fear, cynicism, anxiety and extreme pessimism, many voters may have decided that civility is a surrender to a rigged system, that optimism is the opiate of the idiots and that humility and gentleness are simply surrendering to the butchers of ISIS. If that’s the case then the throes of a completely new birth are upon us and Trump is a man from the future.

If that’s true it’s not just politics that has changed, but the country.

And I think this is the most terrifying part to me - watching the BernieBros and anyone-but-Hillary group succumb to the same bitterness and viciousness that has swallowed the Republican convention whole. The invalidation of everything that the Democratic Convention appealed to - the principles that make America great (yes, I say that as an Australian who would never give up her citizenship). The belief that a finger lifted to the establishment by nominating and supporting a wildcard is better than trying to fix it. The conviction that the only person who matters is them and their opinion and their anger; that their Muslim, non-white neighbour deserves no safety or security or consideration in their vote because they were not given what they wanted.

Yes, it is an entirely human selfishness that prompts such a mentality; that doesn’t mean that we should give in to it.

Google Ngrams, now with wildcards and embedding

Google Ngrams will now let you search for wildcard characters using an asterisk, to answer questions like, what word most commonly comes before or after another word? 

You can also combine this with part-of-speech labels. For example, in the chart below, I’ve searched for the ten most common nouns that precede “language”. We can see that “Hebrew language” was the most popular in the 1800s, and that “programming language” was really popular in the 1990s but has recently been overtaken by “body language”. 

It won’t work in tumblr’s dash view, but on most sites you can now embed an interactive ngram graph the same way you’d embed a video: just click the “embed” link to the right of a chart. 

Here’s some more fun things you can do with the wildcards. Note that you can also click on a line to highlight it or right-click anywhere on the chart to expand or contract the lines. 

For a more precise search, I’d still recommend a corpus like COCA or BNC, but the wildcards and part-of-speech tags are definitely making Google Ngrams even more useful and interesting. 

NSFW Alphabet Masterlist

A=Aftercare // B=Body Part // C=Cum // D=Dirty Secret // E=Experience: // F=Favorite Position // G=Goofy // H=Hair // I=Intimacy // J=Jack Off // K=Kink // L=Location // M=Motivation // N=No // O=Oral  // P=Pace // Q=Quickie // R=Risk // S=Stamina // T=Toys // U=Unfair // V=Volume // W=Wildcard // X=X-Ray // Y=Yearning // Z=Zzz