why is it usually the villains

Someone finally asked 'South Park' co-creator Trey Parker to be in a movie

With 25 years of animation work and well over 500 characters under his belt, you’d think South Park co-creator Trey Parker would have fielded hundreds of voiceover offers throughout the years. Or at least, dozens. Or even… one?

“This was, believe it or not, the very first pitch I ever got,” Parker tells EW of his role as manic ‘80s villain Balthazar Bratt in Despicable Me 3 (out June 30). “My instinct is usually ‘F— no, I do my own s—,’ but when I got it, I was actually really flattered. I was like, ‘Wow, someone actually asked me to do something.’ And also I was kind of like, ‘Well, why the f— has no one ever asked me to do this before?’”

Parker already knows the answer—or at least, he has a fairly good guess. For years, he assumed that his association with the lewd and long-running Comedy Central cartoon that he co-created with Matt Stone in 1997 rendered him a woefully incompatible selling point for children’s animation. “For a while I thought, you take a kids’ movie and you throw Trey Parker up there and maybe some adults go ‘nuh-uh,’” he says, laughing. “But also, I do every voice I could possibly do on South Park, so it’s not like you can say, ‘Hey, come do some new character for us.’ Until this offer came in, I hadn’t really thought about it that it’s the first time anybody’s ever asked me to do something like this.”

For the 47-year-old, stepping into Despicable Me 3 also marked the first time he would be directed in the recording booth by someone other than himself. Save for 1998’s BASEketball, Parker has always had a hand in writing and/or directing every major project on his resume, and on South Park, he wears hats of writer, director, producer, and performer. Here, he had one job—to act.

“It was definitely tables turned,” he explains. “The funny thing was, with every actor I bring into the booth on South Park, I know for sure they’re not going to do it big enough. You stick a mic in their face and you put headphones on, and you automatically get smaller—especially real actors who are used to being so small because the camera’s zoomed right on their face picking up every little nuance. So as a director on South Park, I’m always telling people to do it bigger. And the opposite happened here. When I walked in that first day, they gave me the big speech I always give to people: ‘Now listen, don’t get discouraged, but we’re probably going to want you to bring the energy level up.’ And I’m thinking, ‘Oh my God, this is exactly what I tell people.’ So I do the first couple of Bratt’s lines and they go, ‘Oh! Okay…so…let’s bring it down a little bit?”

The booth means something different to Parker, whose time recording lines on South Park is often a first pass on the material; he’ll take note of reactions from his colleagues, rewrite lines in his head, direct Stone and the other voice actors, and perform his own role, with 100 things in motion at once. (“To me, the booth is just the beginning,” he says. “It was really weird [on Despicable Me] to say the lines and then be done. I’d be like, ‘I’m done? You mean like, go get a sandwich done? Really?”) On the grander timeline, a major animated feature like Despicable will usually take anywhere between two to five years to complete—a stark opposition from the weekly process of South Park, wherein an episode famously goes from conception to air in six days. “I started to get the idea of the corporate machine—you’ve got these celebrities that you’ve got to schedule time with, and pay them every time, so you’ve got to [cover your bases],” Parker recalls. “I would do a line and they’d go, ‘Okay, but he’s angry here, so can you do it angry?’ So I would. And then they’d say, ‘Now, can you try it like he’s sort of happy?’ And I’m like, ‘Well, is he happy or is he angry?’ And I slowly started to realize that they’re trying to get every version of this because they just don’t know yet. For me, it’s a matter of running back and forth in the booth. For them, they’ve got to get every single thing they can, and realizing that was really helpful to me. At first, I thought I was just really f—ing up a lot.”

Parker has claimed he can only do about 80 variations of his voice, so inevitably, the character of Balthazar Bratt (an insane former ‘80s child star who lost his fans after puberty and subsequently vowed to destroy them) would logically share some sonic quality with at least one resident of South Park. The lucky character: Randy Marsh. “Bratt looks a bit like Stan’s dad, although the difference to me is that Randy is a big f—up but has a big heart, and Bratt doesn’t. But Randy’s voice is just kind of my voice anyway, so I worked on it enough so that it didn’t sound exactly like Randy and was his own thing,” says Parker. “The other thing I thought of when I saw the character was Kirk Cameron—a guy who obviously was the s— in the ‘80s and then went crazy and turned to religion. I wanted Bratt’s voice to be somewhat generic, because Illumination is so much about the visual of things that if you add too zany of a voice, it starts to become overly cartoony.”

Ironically, it was Despicable Me, not South Park, that clued his daughter, Betty, into the brilliance of what her dad does for a living. Parker says, “I had brought her into South Park to do a line as Kyle’s little brother—I think she was 2 and a half at that point — and I had put her in front of the mic and said, ‘Say this,’ and she did, but I know that it was definitely stuck in her head, like, ‘What was that?’ But then there was a day on Despicable Me when I brought my wife and daughter into the booth, and she sat there for an hour on the couch, and they showed her a little bit of animation, and she was just watching me with these headphones on doing these big lines, totally laughing. So the next week, I brought her in to do more on South Park, and she just lit up. She put the headphones on and goes, “Okay, how should I do it now?’ She just suddenly got it.”

What Betty doesn’t know just yet is that Parker took the role in Despicable because of the opportunity he saw—not in voicing a part in someone else’s film, but in finally making something that his daughter could actually see. “That’s been the nice thing—I did it for her, and the thing that made it all worth it was when we saw Sing, and as we’re sitting there in the theater, the preview came up for Despicable Me. And the trailer ended, and it was that thing where everything was super loud and then the theater got really quiet because the trailer’s over, and she just yells out in the silence, ‘That’s my daddy!’ Man, it was the best feeling ever.”

Horror parodies are seldom as funny, and never as scary, as fright-flicks that play their scares, er, straight. Jordan Peele — the shorter half of the 21st century’s funniest sketch-comedy duo — understands this, and that’s why Get Out, his debut feature as writer and director, is so truly, madly, mercilessly entertaining, even when it makes you want to jump out of your skin. It is small-c catholic in its tastes, liberally sampling elements of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, Rosemary’s Baby and Invasion of the Body Snatchers before morphing into the most potent racial revenge fantasy since Django Unchained. But a parody it’s not: It’s as gnarly as Green Room, 2016’s nerviest thriller, whose villains wore their bigotry on their tattooed arms. What makes Get Out stand out is that its social critique — usually present in the horror-survival genre as subtext — is very much its text.

That’s a writing trick Peele and his creative partner, Keegan-Michael Key, used over and over again through five seasons of their marvelous Comedy Central series, one that boasted production values that stood head and shoulders above anything else in sketch TV. Key & Peele’s movie sendups looked like real movies, and now we have a good idea why: Peele is a world-class filmmaker. (Nearly all Key & Peele episodes were directed by Peter Atencio, who also directed the two comics in last year’s Keanu. That was a funny movie, but it had nothing like the invention, the intensity or the shimmering, righteous anger that Get Out possesses.) His movie is as much a triumph of craft as of inspiration.

‘Get Out’: A Terrifically Topical — And Terrifying — Satire

Photo: Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures

why is crewniverse so insistent on hiring celebrities for REALLY IMPORTANT characters? you know how in most cartoons when they have a celebrity cameo they’re usually not important to the plot and they only show up for an episode or two? THAT is how you use a celebrity voice. might as well have a silly non-important character with the celeb because they’re too expensive to get back. 

(this is a character from woy voiced by weird al. is he super ultra important to the plot? no! he’s just a silly one off/two off villain. a lot of weird al’s cameos are like this lmao)

i’m not saying all celebrity voice one offs have to be completely silly and can’t be emotional, though

for example, michael jackson’s cameo in the simpsons, where he wrote “happy birthday lisa” (even though he wasn’t allowed to sing it under contract so he handpicked an impersonator himself). it was emotional, but again he wasn’t an integral plot important character

the crewniverse can’t seem to understand this. the two celebrity voices they’ve had so far who they Apparently don’t have enough money to get back (nicki minaj and uzo aduba) have been integral plot important characters, sugilite and bismuth. one is the fusion of two of the main characters, and the other is an old member of the crystal gems who was bubbled by rose quartz and only let out after years of imprisonment

these two characters, being THIS plot important, should NOT have had celebrity voices if money is really the issue. characters this important should have affordable voices so they can show up more and get fleshed out properly. the crewniverse should’ve used the celebrities they could only get once to voice a character who ISN’T so vitally important to the story of the show. it was a really bad move.

not having enough money to have a returning celebrity voice for a plot important character is the crewniverse’s own fault. as i said, it was a bad move. it isn’t an excuse. it’s a bad decision. technically TWO bad decisions.

Stereotyped vs Nuanced Characters and Audience Perception

Writing with color receives many questions regarding the stereotypes Characters of Color and their story lines may possess.

There’s a difference between having a three-dimensional character with trait variance and flaws, versus one who walks the footsteps of a role people of their race/ethnicity are constantly put into. Let’s discuss this, as well as how sometimes, while there’s not much issue with the character, a biased audience will not allow the character to be dimensional.

But first: it’s crucial to consider the thinking behind your literary decisions.

Trace your Logic 

When it comes to the roles and traits you assign your characters, it’s important to ask yourself why you made them the way they are. This is especially true for your marginalized characters.

So you need an intimidating, scary character. What does intimidating look like on first brainstorm? Is it a Black man, large in size or presence? (aka a Scary Black Man) A Latino with trouble with the law? If so, why?

Really dig, even as it gets uncomfortable. You’ll likely find you’re conditioned to think of certain people in certain roles on the spot.

It’s a vicious cycle; we see a group of people represented a certain way in media, and in our own works depict them in the way we know. Whether you consciously believe it’s the truest depiction of them all or not, we’re conditioned to select them for these roles again and again. Actors of Color report on being told in auditions they’re not performing stereotypical enough and have been encouraged to act more “ethnic.” 

This ugly merry-go-round scarcely applies to (cis, straight) white people as they are allowed a multitude of roles in media. Well, then again, I do notice a funny trend of using white characters when stories need a leader, a hero, royalty, a love interest…

Today’s the day to break free from this preconditioned role-assigning.

Keep reading

Romance, Representation And You

So the last post I reblogged got some interesting comments I want to touch on, namely people stating that they don’t dislike Romance because it’s fluffy and feel good, but because it is often sexist, misogynistic, ableist, heteronormative and woefully lacking in diversity, which yes, absolutely, yes. Those are entirely valid criticisms of the genre—indeed I find them to be valid of any genre, whether it’s sci-fi, fantasy, young adult or otherwise. There is a shocking lack of diversity in our fiction and media—and not because people don’t want it or aren’t trying to make it, but because publishing houses and media can’t see the co-relation between what their marketing teams are telling them, and the actual reality that of course straight white stories are selling the best, of course it is, because you won’t sell anything else, that’s why there’s no sales numbers for anything else.

I worked in a romance publishing house for a good few years, I also worked for their erotica team, and do you know, not once did I ever come across a manuscript with a disabled person? Not a single one. There was also never a manuscript that featured a character with mental illness who wasn’t the villain, or whose issues couldn’t be Fixed With Love™(*vomit*). 

The few times a story featured non white characters, it was usually “The Best Friend Who Gives Sassy Real Advice”, or so horrifically racist that our modus operandi was to nuke it from the office servers rather than try and deal with it because how do you politely tell an author, hey, you’re a fetishistic piece of shit please find God and change the entirety of your story so we can print it, (Answer: you don’t there is no polite way to tell someone they are a  fetishistic piece of shit and you never want their work to darken your inbox ever again.) when you can instead say “Sorry, not what we’re looking for a the moment” and retreat to the relative safety of the slushpile where maybe, just maybe, a hidden gem awaits excavation.

And our publishing house prided itself on diversity because we had an LGBT section, and oh boy let me tell you I was so excited when I got moved over onto that side…only to realize, there’s no w/w fiction because “it doesn’t sell well” and 90% of the m/m fiction is being written by women for women and they fired the one gay author cause his work wasn’t “what was selling” and every bisexual character I ever encountered was either Actually Gay/Actually Straight, or surprise! The Evil Greedy Homewrecker who needs to pick a side, booo hiiiiss, grab your pitchforks and burn the witch.

And I remember, I remember looking to my senior editor who was also my friend at the time, a poly bisexual, mentally ill woman and saying “what the fuck Rebecca” (yes, her name was actually Becky) and she looked at me over our skype call and said “You want to keep your job? Deal with it.”

Because you see, Marketing reigns supreme, and Marketing doesn’t give a shit about people like you and me. It doesn’t care if the neurodivergent person wants to see people like them in fiction, it doesn’t care that people of color want to be more than just the friend/villain, they don’t care that there is more to LGBTQIA+ than the L and specifically the G, it doesn’t care if disabled people want to be represented as more than someone ele’s story arc prop. They don’t care they, don’t care, and do you know why so many publishing houses look down on indie publishing and self published authors and try to call them hacks? Because we don’t give a fuck that they don’t care and we’re doing what we want anyway.

Oh sure you get the usual “but the work is so unpolished, no one has vetted it, it’s just bad, this is why we need publishers to stop the crap from rising to the top”—and yet Fifty Shades of Grey still gets a multi-billion dollar production budget and to the top of the best seller list—do you see, where I am going with this? They’re not interested in selling the best they are just interested in selling, and we are living in a society that has a system designed specifically to a quite literally straight and narrow demographic. So of course XYZ stories sell well, of course they do, because that is where the vast majority of marketing goes, to make sure you buy into it. And Romance…Romance is a lucrative industry to be in if you can get the weight of that campaign behind you…but if you can’t? Well, not only do you have to compete with lack of funding and resources, but also the pervasive lie that because you’re not affiliated directly with X Publishing House or Y Agency, you are not good enough, and no one will want to read your story.

And that’s a bunch of baloney. It’s so much baloney you can slap it between two slices of bread and cover it in mustard because the whole thing is a ham.

Do you know what I would have loved growing up? (And still would) Stories about girls who liked people regardless of gender—and who wasn’t conflicted over it because people are people and gender is fluid and irrelevant to love. Stories about people with mental health issues, where the person is still loved and shown as functional, with their mental health issues, not despite. Stories about disabled and ill people who have fulfilling lives whose arc doesn’t revolve around being brave for simply existing or how much of a saint their families/loved ones are for putting up with them. And do you know what I get instead, even now as an adult who has worked in the industry that sells these stories? I get things like Fifty Shades of Domestic Abuse, and train wrecks like You Before Me where the death of the disabled person is seen as a romantic gesture of selflessness that sets the love interest free to fully live her life. HOW FUCKING FUCKED UP IS THAT. Oh you can argue with me all you want that wasn’t  Moyes intent when she was writing it, but it damn well was the end result.

Yes, Romance is lacking, and yes it needs revamped, it needs more cultural diversity, it needs more inclusion, it needs so many things—but it also needs for people to not want to not write for it because it’s “fluffy” and cheap, like somehow they are selling their souls away. 

I’ve got friends who have written amazing, diverse stories told from their point of view…but they won’t ever get them published because as soon as you mention self publishing or the Romance industry they turn their noses up. And they’re shooting themselves in the foot in doing so, because there ain’t no way a story about XYZ is going to make it in a sci-fi house, no matter who much tech you add in. On the flipside of that, I’ve also got a friend who has written about her experiences as a Black queer disabled woman and it’s filled with relationships and great life stuff and so funny…but she can’t get it published anywhere because she’s been explicitly made to feel like she doesn’t belong in the genre because her stories are too complex, they’re too different they’re too comedic…too…too…too (the list goes on). And that’s awful because Romance is a genre that is primarily about people and if you as a Romance house are telling me you can’t sell a story about people, boy are we well and truly fucked.

The biggest criticism of the Romance genre shouldn’t be that it’s too damn happy and therefore unrealistic and nothing but fluff. What’s unrealistic is the complete lack of diversity and inclusion in the genre that makes it so alienating that a huge part of our society immediately feels like they don’t belong. 

And that’s a bigger problem than fluff.

So great, yes fine, Romance isn’t for you, you can tell me all the time that you don’t like Romance and I will cheerfully talk to you about literally anything else. But don’t ever tell me you don’t like Romance because it’s simple and fluffy when there’s a whole wealth of actual problematic shit to dislike it for.

And to you, yes you, I’m talking to you. You with the idea in the back of your head and the worry that you’ll never be a Serious Author because all you want to write about is romance and people and angst and fluff and also thinking no one wants to read stories about people like you: take that idea and run with with it, learn from your experiences and keep doing it some more and maybe one day we’ll have the publishing industry we deserve that will acknowledge you. But until then: Rebel and Do It Anyway.

Writing Antagonists: (Aka, Your Villains and Bad Guys)

The antagonist is often either one of the most fun things to write, or the most dreaded. But either way, they are a key element of the story, and that cannot be ignored. So, let’s talk about how to make a really great antagonist.

You may have in the past met a writer or teacher or whomever who insists on using the words “protagonist and antagonist” over words like “hero and villain.” Personally, I am not so stingy about it, I feel that I know what you mean anyway so it doesn’t really matter- what there is a legitimate reason as to why you should at least try to think of your villain as your antagonist instead.

And that reason is connotation. Well, denotation too, really- villain and antagonist aren’t completely the same thing, but I’m bringing it down to connotation. 

Simply said, when you think of the word “villain”, you’ll think something like “that’s the bad guy in the story.” And when you think of the “antagonist”, you probably think “that’s a fancy word for villain, aka the bad guy in the story.”

But antagonist isn’t just a fancy word. It’s a fancy concept. It means “the guy that opposes the good guy.” That can be on any argument or view. When writing your antagonist is to remember that nothing is black/white, good/bad thinking, and that includes your antagonist.

Let’s map out the steps to making a complex villain- aka, an antagonist.

First, remember that your antagonist (usually) is a person, just like your protagonist. It might help to develop them outside of their intentions first, and put a person to the upcoming reputation.

Background:

Chances are, your antagonist didn’t just rise up out of the ground ready to kill. They came from somewhere. Your readers don’t even have to know everything about your antag’s backstory, but you do, if you want to really understand them. It often holds the key reason as to why your antagonist is where they are. The drive behind anger, revenge, change, or pleasing someone else can come from the events in their background.

Why do they hold the beliefs they hold? Were they raised that way? Were they taught by some mentor figure? Were they cover from a reality they couldn’t bear? Are they trying to please someone, or get revenge on someone who displeased them? The answer should be in their background.

Motives/Beliefs:

Remember, every villain is a hero in their own mind. They believe that what they are doing is necessary, even if they recognize that it is unpleasant. What are they fighting for? Why does it matter to them so much, that they are willing to overlook all the harm they do?

“The Greater Good”: This is one of the more common and understandable villain motives. They believe that what they are doing now is paving the way to a better future. But keep in mind that what your antag views as a “better future” may be very, very different than the average opinion. Maybe a “better future” for them is a genocidal purge or the world ending in flames. Who knows.

That’s not the only type of motive. Be creative. Work with the information you established in your character’s background to find the most reasonable motive.

Tipping Point:

This is going to be related to your background and motive in an interesting way. Think of your antagonist as a character who has already completed their Character Arc and reached a negative end. Look at the points of change on the character arc- the ones that push your character farther down their path. What are those events? Those are the tipping points that prompted your character towards becoming they way they are now- those key moments where your character had a choice, and they chose to become bitter, hateful, vengeful, cold, or other negative things.

These could be the deaths of loved ones, the promptings of a mentor, or a moment of injustice that made them realize that the world isn’t always kind.

Personality/Actions:

This is the part where you develop them outside of their intentions. How do they behave? 

It’s tempting to just say that your villain is a villain because they torture and kill people. But those are not the only things that make a villain a scary or serious threat. Some characters might jump to violence easier than others. Some might be more into psychological torment. Some might actually seem really charming or persuasive, which is frightening in it’s own way- they might actually be tricky enough to confuse you into making bad decisions on your own. Think about your character’s background again. What makes the most sense for them as a person?

Presentation:

This is how your antagonist comes across to others. Keep in mind that your reader and your other characters don’t know your antagonist like you do. How does this person present to the world? 

-Are they open to discussion/negotiation?

-Are they open about their intentions?

-How quick are they to violence?

-What are their methods of war?

-When you meet them, are they charismatic, quiet, charming, vulgar? Do they have a sense of humor, or are they stoic?

-Do they seem to enjoy what they are doing, or do they express regrets even as they do it?

Moral Complexity:

What are they willing to do to achieve their goals? Do they have weaknesses in their personal lives?

1. Do they have noble ends behind their controversial means?

2. Is there a line even they won’t cross?

3. Do they have someone/something that they care about?

4. Do they prefer to do the killing/torturing etc themselves or do they just give the order?

Remember that if your antagonist does have any of these moral weaknesses, they are not going to want to show it. One has to keep up intimidating appearances, after all. 

Speaking of appearances…

Appearance:

This part is here to tell you what not to do. There are certain appearances that are getting really old with villains.

1. Dressing in all black. Why do they even do that? It’s time to stop associating black with “bad” and white with “good”. It just isn’t like that, so stop making villains all dark and stuff.

2. Scars. I think scars are pretty cool, don’t get me wrong. But if there is no relevant reason for it to be there, don’t talk about it all the time. That goes for all characters, not just villains. Like the color black, scars are not just a villain thing. Everyone has them. Don’t associate them with “bad.”

3. Sexy. I get the idea that making a villain attractive makes them harder to hate, but that can be kind of a cop out of actual complexity. Again, if there is no legitimate reason to make your villain sexy, then don’t. It’s not necessary.

4. Ugly. I hesitate to call any traits inherently ugly, but if you’re striving to make your character unpleasant looking just because they’re bad, then once again, you are associating feature=evil, which is not creative at best and seriously socially harmful at worst. 

Basically, your villains should be just as diverse as anyone else. You don’t need stereotypes to make them scary. Sometimes it’s scarier than anything else to just have an average person. It sort of adds to the idea that anyone could be a villain. And that’s pretty frightening.

Key Point:

- Complicate your villains. They’re not just Evil McEvilpants. 

That’s it for now, but like anything else in writing, antagonists have a lot of possibility and exceptions. But that was your basic rundown on the things to consider when making a complicated antagonist. 

~Penemue

How to Give Your Antagonist a Little Humanity

There is such a thing as your antagonist being too over-the-top. There’s a possibility that they can become static or one-dimensional if you don’t understand why they’re the protagonist. Not many people in the world are evil for the sake of being evil. There’s usually a reason behind what they’re thinking and feeling, so try to explore that with your own characters. Remember, the antagonist is usually the hero in their own story.

Focus on background

Knowing your antagonist’s personal background should add more dimensions to your story. Do they have a family? Is there something specific that happened that shaped them? Understanding where each of your characters came from and how they came to be the way they are will really help add depth. Your readers will begin to see what makes them tick.

Know what they want

Antagonists have wants and needs, just like any other character. You should always know what your protagonist wants if you want to drive the story forward and the same can be said for your antagonist. What are they searching for? Why do they want to stop the protagonist? Do they want the same thing as the protagonist? This will help you figure out your conflict.

Is there someone they care about?

Knowing what your antagonist cares about will reveal a lot about them.  Sure, sometimes mindless unstoppable villains are exciting, but it doesn’t work for every story. Smart antagonists that care about something are usually more enticing. You can make them a bit more humane if you reveal what they care about. Do they believe what they’re doing will actually save the world? Do they think they’re doing the right thing? Consider these questions.

What do they think about the protagonist?

It’s not necessary for the antagonist to absolutely hate the protagonist. Sometimes it’s more interesting if they respect each other or if they already have a relationship. Do they think the protagonist is completely wrong? Do they understand their point-of-view? Knowing what your antagonist thinks will help form a realistic relationship between the protagonist and antagonist. It will help you shape your story into something better.

-Kris Noel

What’s Love Got to Do With it?

Your opinions are so interesting… So I ask you, what you think about Furuta’s love for Rize? What was revealed recently with Mutsuki makes me think they are same in a some way, I mean a twisted love and unhealthy obsession in a one-sided.
Asked by Anonymous

An interesting question posed to me in an ask that I’ve decided to turn into a full meta because I think the asker is missing that Furuta and Mutsuki are not the only ones with unrequited love this arc. Luckily I’ve drawn up a chart.

Why all of this unrequited love all of a sudden? Is it because Ishida wishes to write a Shoujo manga with corpses, and has decided to convert the last arc into one? It goes deeper than that, so let’s analyze it under the cut. 

Keep reading

The types of ship-haters you will encounter in any fandom:
  • Type 1: Chooses to ignore the romantic tension and will classify the relationship as “brother-sister”. May not actually have a sibling if they are this type.
  • Type 2: Disapproves of the white, female character getting together with the man of color, no matter how decent of a person they are. Doesn't like being called racist but may intentionally or unintentionally say something racist to make their point.
  • Type 2a: also works in reverse. However, the people who don't like women of color getting together with the lead white guy are much more vocal than the typical type-2 people.
  • Type 3: Will argue that straight pairings suck and will make arguments that (insert female character x insert female character) or (insert male character x insert male character) have better chemistry.
  • Type 4: shipped one of the less popular ships on the show. They are typically nice people since even though their ship isn't happening, they knew what they were getting into.
  • Type 5: "Did the writers have to put the (insert female character) in a relationship? Why couldn't she be a strong, independent woman?"
  • Type 6: "This ship is TOXIC AF. Here, read my dissertation on why this character and this character should not be together".
  • Type 7: Will argue that the chemistry and romance are forced and the writers suck for forcing this upon us.
  • Type 8: Will argue that one of the characters in the ship is boring. This usually means the character is decent, is not a complete mess, and is actually a good fit for the other person in the ship. Will also argue that the angsty, unstable, dangerous character is "exciting" and "fun".
  • Type 9: Will ignore the canon ship because for some fucking reason, they think the main villain has better chemistry with the lead female / male character. Even if they're presented with facts that the lead character HATES the villain, they will still dismiss the canon ship in favor of their bizarre crackship. Will also make excuses for the villain's behavior.
  • Type 9a: To add to the previous point, it doesn't have to be the villain. As long as they're unstable and dangerous...and a cis, straight white male.
  • Type 10: "I don't care if it's based on a comic book / book / video game / insert other medium, I still don't like it and I think the adaptation should make some changes."
  • Type 11: Will argue about the age difference, which is typically not a problem unless it's like a 20-year gap.
  • Type 12: Will voice their displeasure through memes.
  • Type 13: Will voice their displeasure through gifsets / photos / fanarts / manips
  • Type 14: Will voice their displeasure through really aggressive fanfics.
  • Type 15: The Newcomer ("Hey, I'm new to this fandom but I really hope this character and this character don't end up together. Maybe my opinion might change in the next few episodes / chapters"). By default, these people either turn into shippers or remain as haters.
an apology letter to my muse
—  i am sorry that i made a poetry out of every word you said and i am sorry that many a times i painted you as the villain of my stories when you probably were the hero. i am sorry that i told the world your secrets that you shared with me at 2.17am on the nights when it rained a little less and at 1.39am on the nights that were warmer than usual. i am sorry that i talked about you to complete strangers and that i knew more about you than you yourself did. i am sorry if someone ever comes up to you to ask about why you broke my heart, because you didn’t break my heart, i did that and put the blame on you. i am sorry if i made you stay up nights with me because no one could calm down the voices in my head like you did and no one worried about me like you did and so i told you my problems and sometimes made them yours. i am sorry that i talk to my friends about you and sometimes things get out of hand. i am sorry that i never told you how much i love you because i can’t bear to lose our friendship and i can’t bear rejection. i am sorry for all the times i cursed you at 3am because my stupid brain couldn’t stop thinking of you.
i am sorry that i kind of used you to break my heart over and over again even after it was already broken just to feel the pain so that i could write about it all. i am sorry that i couldn’t let go of you when i should have, i am sorry that i am still holding on, i am sorry.

my ten cents about vriska serket’s “abilities” as a “manipulator”:

i think a lot of the reason people are flabbergasted to see the words “vriska isn’t manipulative” is because first of all, there is a big misunderstanding about the nuance of abuse and abusive situatuations and which harmful aspects of abuse (manipulation, gaslighting, battery, etc) are at play in which instances of abuse. abuse isn’t black and white and not all abuse has the same exact hallmarks – someone can be abusive without being manipulative.

the other big issue i’m seeing is that so much of the fandom has a really poor understanding of vriska’s character.

there are a lot of people in this fandom who believe that vriska is cruel for the sake of cruel, mean because she wants to be, and a master manipulator who destroys the lives of everyone around her and laughs at the wreckage.

in ACTUALITY… vriska is a mess. a lot of the things she does are stupid, impulsive things she later very vocally regrets. she doesn’t actually strive for complete chaos – sadly, she’s very often actually trying to help, but she has poor social skills, no friends who trust her, and a hair trigger temper that often sends her into tantrums. she’s extremely emotional and impulsive.

and it’s not to say vriska can’t be clever – she is a smart girl who sometimes actually does execute plans that work (it happened once!) and the whole situation with jade and prototyping bec (i can’t remember the details exactly) was certainly a time when vriska cleverly executed something she was attempting. it completely fucking failed and blew up in everyone’s faces! but she is clever enough to come up with elaborate schemes in a pinch. they just don’t usually… work, and in most situations she uses brute force or has a meltdown instead of doing anything actually clever

vriska isn’t ACTUALLY a one note villain. that’s why people like her. her motivations are far from one dimensional cartoon villain – in fact, sadly, her motivation for her shitty behavior is either “abused child with no outlet and poor social skills trying to cope” or “my poor temperament flared and now all my friends hate me even more and i have to fix it”

vriska wanting to be a hero is hilarious in the context of the comic, especially when hussie first introduced her and she was absolutely insufferably annoying and pointlessly cruel. but as hussie elaborated on her character she became much deeper and more complex – her wanting to be a hero isn’t just because she’s a glory hound. it’s also because her life circumstances made her a child soldier who could not afford to have friends and whose social skills were too poor for her to ask for help or reach out to others. vriska wants people to respect her for a lot of reasons, but one big one is that she’s an abuse survivor who was starved of positive attention her entire fucking life

of course she wants to be a hero because of mindfang and because she’s a glory hound and etc, but it also boils down to the fact that vriska is literally too. fucking weird to understand “being nice to people” = friends, and probably feels like she’s too far gone for “being nice” to get her anywhere, so she HAS to be the big damn hero. THEN she will have made up for all of her wrongdoings. THEN her friends will truly forgive her. THEN people will like and respect her genuinely instead of hating her and mocking her to her face.

What went down in Dislocoeur
  • INTRO SEQUENCE
  • Ms. Bustier: in many fairy tales the prince breaks the spell by kissing the princess, can anyone tell me why?
  • Rose: BECAUSE DO THE SMOOCHY THING
  • Ms. Bustier: that's not really an answer
  • Max: technically this only applies to 87% of fairy tales
  • Ms. Bustier: there's no way that number is correct
  • Ms. Bustier: maybe like 7% or 8% at most
  • Rose: DO THE SMOOCHY THING
  • Ms. Bustier: yes Rose we got that
  • Rose: DO THE SMOOCHY THING DO THE SMOOCHY THING DO THE SMOOCHY THING
  • Ms. Bustier: who are you even talking to
  • Ms. Bustier: are you saying that in the imperative
  • Rose: pls do the smoochy thing :( #ladynoir
  • Adrien: well I just wrote this poem time to toss it in the garbage with the rest of the fandom
  • Marinette: hmm I wonder what that hot guy threw in the trash
  • Marinette: ooh it's a poem!
  • Marinette: "roses are red, violets are violet, poetry is f**king hard, do the smoochy thing pls"
  • Chloé: hmm why is Marinette looking through the garbage
  • Sabrina: did you know there's an entire fandom in there?
  • Chloé: wow she must be really desperate
  • Max: kk Kim it's time for you to run along this route and meet your crush on a bridge
  • Kim: why is her route so convoluted
  • Max: idk but if you meet her on that particular bridge and give her this particular jewel you've got a 87% chance of success
  • Kim: there's no way that number is correct
  • Kim: maybe like 7% or 8% at most
  • Marinette: I say go for it!
  • Kim: kk, running now
  • Alya: NO WAIT COME BACK
  • Alya: NEVER TAKE ROMANTIC ADVICE FROM MARINETTE
  • Marinette: now imma write a poem to Adrien
  • Chloé: and imma break the hearts of a buncha tweens
  • Chloé: hey tweens! you see how fabulous I am? well I'm never gonna date you
  • Chloé: do you see what you're missing out on
  • Chloé: well that was fun anyway I hope one of you gets akumatized now
  • Chloé: F**K ALL Y'ALL TO THE END OF THE WORLD AND BACK
  • Chloé: b**ch I'm out
  • Kim: *goes to bridge*
  • Kim: this is the Pont des Arts, right?
  • Kim: so where did all the locks go
  • Kim: it's just panes of plexiglass
  • Kim: this is way less romantic now
  • Chloé: hey Kim
  • Kim: hey Chloé lemme smash
  • Chloé: are you for real
  • Kim: I got you blue AND yellow
  • Chloé: you're as pathetic as that meme
  • Kim: she doesn't want blue and yellow
  • Chloé: look I've got a buncha tweens clamoring after me now
  • Chloé: so you're like fourth in line at best
  • Chloé: BYE
  • Kim: what has my life come to
  • Hawkmoth: wow this is even more sad than usual
  • Hawkmoth: like, I actually feel really sorry for you
  • Hawkmoth: so here have an incredibly cool transformation
  • Dislocoeur: now we're talkin
  • Dislocoeur: I've got a bow and arrows!
  • Dislocoeur: pew pew pew!
  • Marinette: and now it's POETRY TIME
  • Alya: whaddaya got
  • Marinette: "roses are nerds, poems are easy, lemme smash pls bc I think you're hot"
  • Alya: wot
  • Marinette: wow romance really isn't all that great when you're honest about it
  • Alya: wow and here I didn't think you'd ever have enough experience with romance to figure that out
  • Marinette: ooh sweet burn
  • Marinette: btw that flying guy just shot you with an arrow
  • Alya: yeah that's where the sweet burn came from
  • Alya: and now I'm suddenly tempted to go confront Nino in a rap battle
  • Marinette: YES DO IT
  • Marinette: ok Tikki let's kick that flying guy's butt
  • Dislocoeur: hey it's Ladybug!
  • Marinette: no not yet
  • Dislocoeur: oops sorry
  • Marinette: Tikki, spots on!
  • Dislocoeur: there we go!
  • Ladybug: welp running away now
  • Dislocoeur: pew pew pew!
  • Chat Noir: hey Ladybug I've got a confession to make
  • Ladybug: look I already know you love me ok?
  • Ladybug: please don't endanger us by confessing what's already incredibly obvious when there's a supervillain trying to shoot us
  • Dislocoeur: *shoots Chat Noir*
  • Ladybug: that one's on him
  • Dislocoeur: yeah kinda
  • Chat Noir: now imma kill you
  • Ladybug: why
  • Chat Noir: because hate always wins
  • Ladybug: citation needed
  • Chat Noir: citation: the US election
  • Ladybug: ok fair point
  • Chat Noir: you just accepted anecdotal evidence as proof of a general claim
  • Ladybug: oops you're right
  • Chat Noir: now prepare to die
  • Dislocoeur: *tracks down Chloé*
  • Chloé: wow and here I thought you couldn't get any more ridiculous
  • Dislocoeur: imma shoot you now
  • Chloé: and give me the ability to make even sweeter burns than usual?
  • Dislocoeur: wait nvm that's a terrible idea
  • Chloé: wow even as a villain you can't succeed in anything
  • Dislocoeur: hey Hawkmoth can you Tier 2 akumatize me?
  • Hawkmoth: sorry buddy you're on your own
  • Ladybug: I gotta figure out how to dehateify Chat Noir!
  • Brain ghost Ms. Bustier: the prince breaks the spell by kissing the princess
  • Brain ghost Rose: DO THE SMOOCHY THING
  • Ladybug: disclaimer—the following kiss is intended solely as a means of counteracting Dislocoeur's akuma-granted ability, and should not be interpreted in any romantic or otherwise non-platonic context
  • Ladybug and Chat Noir: *do the smoochy thing*
  • Rose: YES THIS IS PERFECT
  • Chat Noir: I don't remember any of that
  • Ladybug: good now end that f**ker
  • Chat Noir: *ends that f**ker*
  • Ladybug: well I guess we're done here
  • ROLL CREDITS

diabeticbeauty  asked:

But what BH experiences those pesky emotions. He has no clue how to deal

BH’s default emotion is anger. He’s very familiar with that one. But the rest? Oh boy

  • Sadness: Sometimes he feels bad, but doesn’t understand why. Maybe it’s anger? yeah, it must be anger. he’s just angry that this happened. it’s probably just his usual rage.
  • Happiness: it’s like an allergic reaction to the smell of money, right? (BH gets confused whenever he feels that nice without money around)
  • Fear: BH causes fear. He’s not supposed to experience it. He doesn’t know what it feels like. (At least, that’s what he says. but there was a time, millennia ago, when he knew very well what fear was)
  • Jealousy: He REFUSES to acknowledge its existence, but he feels it. It’s not envy; he already has everything he wants: money, employees, a successful business. But he doesn’t want to lose anything he owns. That’s not acceptable, for someone like him. He’s an extremely possessive, materialistic person, and he refuses to let anyone take away what’s rightfully his.
  • Embarrassment: he doesn’t really feel shame, but he doesn’t like to be made fun of. So he just gets mad, again.
  • Surprised: He can be startled, either by Dr. Flug creating an actually useful invention, Dementia sneaking up on him, or 5.0.5 trapping him in a classic hug-ambush

Overall BH still doesn’t know what the names of feelings are and normally reacts to everything with rage haha

A Complete Guide on How To Lucid Dream

Here’s my step by step complete guide on how to lucid dream. The most effective way to lucid dream (based on my research and personal experience) which may give you a lucid dream tonight!

This will be a combination of some already known lucid dreaming techniques which are WILD,WBTB,MILD, and FILD. Look it up on Google. 

1. Want it.

Yep. Power of the mind. You have to really want it and intend to do it. Try reading a lot about lucid dreaming during the day before you go to sleep at night. Tell yourself that lucid dreaming is easy,everyone can do it, and that you will lucid dream tonight. “Tonight I’m gonna realize I’m in my dream and I will control it.” or something like that. 

2. Go to sleep

Just go to sleep normally. Don’t attempt to induce lucid dream straightaway, it might lead to insomnia. Mind that you might have to have a good sleeping pattern first.

3. Wake up 2 hours before your normal wake up time

Set your alarm clock. If you usually wake up at 6 am, set the alarm at 4 am. I found that 4 am is best for me (after going to bed at 9.30 pm that night)

4. Stay up for 30 minutes

Try not to look at your phone or laptop screen. Sometimes I don’t know what to do to spend those 30 minutes either. Drink a glass of water, go to the toilet, I don’t know, anything to keep you from falling back to sleep. 

5. Go back to sleep

Now you can do this in 2 ways.

-> The first is just to simply go back to sleep.

-> The second is to induce lucid dream using WILD technique. We’re going to trick our body to think that we’re asleep eventhough our mind is actually still awake.

Go to bed and lie down on your back. Arms on your sides and feet not touching each other. Don’t move. Don’t scratch (unless it’s unbearable, go on and go back to position), don’t swallow (there’ll be an illusion of a building saliva and that you should swallow it, try not to. Swallowing will tell your body that you’re still awake. However, it’s not that prohibited. I found that swallowing is kind of alright. The key is to let it pass and not to concentrate on it.).

Sometimes it’s hard staying awake, because you may not think too much but may not fall asleep as well. If random thoughts pop up, just “look” at it but don’t interact with it. To stay awake, I usually do FILD (Finger Induced Lucid Dream) by imagining movements of my middle fingers and then my index fingers, like playing two keys on a piano. Middle finger pressing on the bed; middle finger lift. Index finger press; index finger lift, and so on.

Then these will happen:

1. You will enter sleep paralysis. In which you can’t move your body but you’re still awake. Breathing gets heavier. Some people found this scary which I don’t understand. So I suggest you to think positive and to know that sleep paralysis is normal and it happens every night. Your body does it to prevent you from moving and injuring yourself during sleep.

2. You will hear hallucinatory sounds. I usually hear music or birds tweeting. Mind that these sounds will be very very real, vivid, and sometimes loud.

3. You will enter the hypnagogic state. You’ll see colours and shapes through closed eyelids. Just watch it but don’t interact with it. 

And there’s a missing link in which I assume I simply let myself fall asleep altogether. 

6. You will enter the lucid dream

There are 2 ways : 

1. Out Of Body Experience

In which you wake up in your bed, do a reality check (pinch your nose and try breathing through it, if you can breathe means you’re in a dream). Yep you’re in a lucid dream now. I usually go and fly from my balcony after the reality check. 

2. Visualization

You’ll see shadows which will become more and more vivid, turning into a whole dream scene. Yep you’re in a lucid dream now.

6. Explore

Enjoy. Try to control your dream using the power of your mind. 

Some tips to stabilize your lucid dream when it’s fading:

- Rub your hands together

- Spin around

- Touch things, from your shirt to anything around you. 

Updates:

1. If All Else Fails

If you have tried everything above but keep failing,try this way that works for me all the time. So, after you wake up naturally, go to the toilet etc. Then go back to sleep and attempt to do WILD (Wake Induced Lucid Dreaming). You must be in a comfortable state and (as much as you can) not hearing noises from outside. And while usually you try to concentrate on staying awake, this time try to concentrate on falling asleep. Fall asleep conciously. 

2. The (Not) Scary Part

So I recently found why some people are scared during sleep paralysis. I once saw a giant metal creature like the combustion villain in the movie Thor. And I once experienced feeling dragged down by vines during sleep paralysis. Now the key, is to stay positive. Everytime you feel or see anything disturbing or scary during sleep paralysis, calmly tell yourself that it’s all not real. Relax and say in your heart, “Pfft, this isn’t real. Stop it. Imagine beautiful flowers and focus on other things. Peaceful thoughts.” using a badass tone as if you don’t care. It’s all in your head so keep a positive attitude. Don’t panic and take control.

3. How To Resume

Sometimes while you’re in the middle of the dream it just fades to black. The easiest way to resume it is to stay in position and imagine the last scene/view before the blackout. Usually the scene will emerge from the darkness and poof you’re back.

4. Tips & Tricks

I found that it’s easier to induce LD during naptime. Or when you’re taking a nap while being sleep deprived.


I wrote about eating in a lucid dream here

That’s all from me. Have a nice dream. 

Superhero!Seventeen

Seungcheol
•his power is speed
•have you seen those thighs?
•yea, he’s very fast but I mean this in the nicest way possible
•he’s not the sharpest tool in the shed
•while he is the leader of the superhero in training
•he didn’t get there because of his brain, he got there because of how loyal he is
•he’s run back on their first mission to get seungkwan who was trapped under a broken bridge

Jeonghan
•His power is mind control
•he can legitimately get people to do whatever he wants
•when people heard about his power they thought he would be a villain
•but nope he prefers using guns to using his power
•he only likes to use it to mess with the other trainees
•like he will have hoshi go to the kitchen to get him a glass of water
•he’s very in control of his power though, so he’s the second in charge


Joshua
•his power is hypnotism
•he and jeonghan almost have the same power but his is more complex
•his power puts people in an unconscious state, so they don’t remember
•unlike jeonghan’s where they are awake, and know what they’re doing
•once he had hypnotized someone, he can do it again anywhere
•so his power is better for civilians and smaller jobs, while jeonghan versus the villains


Junhui
•he has the power to fly, a classic power
•he can also go hand to hand combat
•he wasn’t born with this power actually, it developed when he was ten
•so he’s trained for a smaller amount of time compared to people his age
•which makes it more amazing, since he is in the top ten
•he’s closest to wonwoo, mingyu and minghao


Soonyoung
•he has X-Ray vision
•meaning that he can look through walls and stuff
•he can look at people’s insides to help mingyu heal them
•like one time Vernon broke his rib, and soonyoung just told mingyu which one to heal
•soonyoung like to remind everyone that even though that have powers, they’re still teens
•he achieves reminding them by pranking them all
•you’d think that they would realize that they couldn’t get him back with the same pranks
•(he can see wonwoo when he’s invisible, if he uses his own power but shhhh)


Wonwoo
•he has the power of invisibility
•which makes everyone laugh because he’s already so quiet
•his power means that soonyoung tries to make him an accomplice for pranks
•he tries to avoid him, but somehow soonyoung finds him
•he suspects that soonyoung can see him, even though the blonde boy denies it
•he likes reading so you can very often see a book floating around
•mingyu often tags along with him or minghao on missions
•wonwoo can fight but he prefers using stun guns or other non harming weapons

Jihoon
•he has telepathy
•he can communicate with everyone through his mind
•if he he really wanted to, he could connect everyone’s mind so they can hear each mother
•he doesn’t usually go on missions, choosing to stay at headquarters to give information to them
•he’s like the third in charge, everyone respects him since he’s gotten them out out of sticky situations while eating cereal
•he’s gotten kidnapped before and managed to outsmart the villains, and texted his location to seungcheol

Seokmin
•he can talk to animals!
•his favorite animal to talk to is dogs
•dolphins scare him, and he won’t explain why to anybody
•he has most definitely helped soonyoung prank people by using his power
•like he just someimes puts flamingos in the bathroom
•crocodiles in the training room
•elephants outside, really anywhere you go, expect some type of animal there
•For missions, he uses the animals as his eyes, so crows flying around
•he won’t have them fight for him unless the others need help
•he cares for these animals like they’re family
•he has a pet owl named hedwig who likes to make fun of him


Mingyu
•mingyu has the power of healing
•it’s very fitting since he hates hurting people
•he often tags along with minghao or wonwoo since both of them are a little hot headed and get hurt in the process
•he is clumsy himself so it’s a good power to have
•the seungcheol and jeonghan are helping him in hand to hand combat
•(he hates that and weapons)
•while jun is helping home with weapons, just in case
•he like to go with the younger teens on missions since they are pretty reckless on their own

Minghao
•He can walk through solid objects
•walls, force fields are no match for him
•he’s like a ghost, a ghost with a temper
•you can bet that he messes with soonyoung by putting dye in his shampoo
•or walking through the walls and cutting in line for the bathroom
•whatever he holds when he goes through walls, can go but there’s a chance they’ll get stuck
•(they found that out when he tried to fly Jun through the bathroom door)
•he likes to go on missions but he has a bad temper, making himself in danger
•so his partner is mingyu, who they thankfully get along well enough
•even though mingyu once threatened that he would heal minghao’s leg in a weird way so he couldn’t bend it

Seungkwan
•he can see the future
•premonitions usually come it his dreams but they can happen when he’s awake
•he dislikes seeing them, since they usually are bad premonitions
•they are like nightmares for him, since they are training to become superheros
•he has seen the trainees die multiple times in his dreams
•he is connected to jihoon so he can tell the older about the future immediately
•he gets nervous when his power happens, he has no control over when it happens
•when he gets nightmares, either jeonghan or Joshua are the ones who calm him down


Vernon
•He can make force fields
•Multiple ones, or big ones to cover the entire city
•instead of fighting villains, he protects citizens by protecting the city
•he and seungkwan are usually a team, since one sees the future and the other can protect
•seungkwan once got a vision when they were in the middle of a mission, that’s he got stuck under the bridge
•Vernon told seungcheol what happened and blames himself for not protecting the younger
•he uses his power pretty frequently
•he uses it at the dorm, and protects himself against the prank that the others play
•and will put tiny force fields, around his stuff so no one can touch it

Chan
•he can copy other powers
•once he copies a power he has it for three or four hours
•the rarer the powers is, the shorter amount of time he has since it burns him out of energy
•his power is rare, so even though he’s the youngest in training he’s one of the ones who could be a superhero
•he is close to jeonghan since the elder likes to baby him
•he admires jihoon since the green haired boy makes sure they’re all safe, and is still so strong

technomancer98  asked:

Could you write a post about INTJs and why they fail. Examine some of the popular INTJs and explain why they failed. For ex. Voldemort, etc. also maybe how they can succeed. I'm not evil,I swear.

Sure you’re not. But if you take over the world, I want in.

(Notice how my brain immediately switched to “villain” after you said “popular” simply because you used Voldemort as an example. I love my INTJ villains, so if you were hoping for something other than villains, it sucks to be you.)

Many INTJ villains fail because they have to; fiction usually dictates the good guys win (unless you are George R.R. Martin), so the INTJ has to make some stupid nonsensical mistake that their Te would probably not make in real life. Such as: leaving the hero alive (so he can cause trouble later) rather than shooting him in the face. Or stopping to boast about what a genius you are, which gives him time to figure out how to stop your maniacal plan.

If Te-using villains were like actual evil Te’s and had zero moral foundation, the movie or television series would be short, because they would simply “deal with the problem” (Te) and kill the heroes right out of the gate. Like, for example (because I love using him as one) – the cardinal in The Musketeers TV show. The series does an excellent job of establishing him as a solid Ni-Te thinking villain, where most of his decisions and evil actions are motivated through Te.

But then, there’s Lady deWinter.

As my INTJ friend pointed out, from a detached “villain” perspective, she is a loose cannon and if this were real life, and the cardinal really was a narcissist incapable of mercy (thus without any moral conscience), killing her would be the most rational solution (Te), because she endangers him at every turn. He cannot control her, she frequently screws up his plans, and threatens to ‘out’ him through association. She’s a psychopath, which means she could turn on him. Any evil INTJ would know this right out of the gate.

But because the screenwriters “like” her, and want her in the plot, the INTJ villain lets her live, in a colossal betrayal of his functional development.

That’s just an example of real life villainy vs. contrived writing. ;)

(If you want to avoid your villain murdering your hero, but still have an NTJ villain, make damn sure it’s not a “convenient” out unworthy of strong Te. Either he never managed to get his hands on your hero, or he has a rational reason for letting him live. Your hero has to be smarter than the evil NTJ villain.)

Anyway, side trip, back to the main point: INTJs fail because of poor Se.

Se is what grounds a Ni into reality. Unless an INTJ develops it, their futuristic vision or expectation lacks realistic expectations. Their perception about people, situations, or ideas will be wrong. They can become so obsessed with their dream of what the future will be, that they neglect to look around them and see what’s happening right now. And, a poor Se will make them “lazy” and “unmotivated,” so they may sit around and scheme or dream or plan and never actually get up and do anything to make those visions real.

(Example of extreme inferior-Se laziness: the cardinal telling deWinter to plant evidence in someone’s room, when he could walk upstairs and do it himself. :P)

OR… they will act irrationally and impulsively with Se, and ruin the entire thing, because FOR ONCE they didn’t think first and then can’t scramble fast enough (more poor Se) to cover their tracks (see the Musketeers season one two-part finale for a great example of the cardinal doing this).

Voldemort failed because of his arrogance. He was intelligent enough to assume he had covered all his bases and that no one could beat him. He failed because he could not adapt to his environment (bad Se). He failed because he was so fixated on making his personal vision of the future real (I will never die, I will be invincible) he did not look around or bother internalizing the meaning of Potter. He focused on the threat and missed everyone’s motivations. Because he is poor at Fi, he made a mistake common to Te users (good or bad): he underestimated how much people care.

Voldemort murdered Lily Potter, which turned Snape against him. He assumed it would not matter. He was wrong. That killed him long before his actual death. He was dead the minute he discounted Snape’s feelings.

You see this in a “good” INTJ character in the Wolf Hall books who makes the same mistake when he arranges a rational marriage for Henry VIII (a foreign princess, an alliance, everyone wins!) and then forced him to hold to it, due to diplomacy, even though Henry hated her. Cromwell signed his death certificate the minute he did that.

What is RATIONAL is not always good for people’s feelings.

Almost all INTJ villains fall into one of these traps: bad Se (misjudging situations, being delusional, failing to adapt in a dangerous situation, or acting impulsively at the wrong moment, because they cannot sense the right moment) or Te devaluation of others’ emotions (killing someone another person cares about, which causes them to turn on them later).

Non-villains still make these mistakes, but there’s nothing vindictive behind it.

Now, how as a sane, moral human being can you succeed?:

Develop your Se. Stop just trusting your hunches and look for evidence. Stop fixating on the future and engage with the present. Stop standing on the sidelines and physically engage with the world once in awhile. Stop being so intellectual that you are a physically lazy human being.

Develop your Fi. If you dismiss and belittle people, sneer at them, etc., they will not like you. To get anywhere in this world, people must like you. Healthy Te understands the world is “give and take” and unnecessary drama, insults, sarcasm, etc., is unprofessional and immature. You need not engage with people’s feelings, but you must respect them and the power they have over other people, even if they seem silly.

Don’t be afraid to take a chance. Sometimes, you have to stop thinking and try. If you fail, you recoup and try again. We are not defined by our failures, but by our willingness to keep trying.

Give yourself reasonable goals. Ones you can work toward in the short and long term, which will allow you to see you are moving forward. If you develop your Se enough, your goals will be achievable, because you will have a sense of how much you can do. Using Te too much will wear you out, so pace yourself.

Go forth INTJs and be awesome! :)

- ENFP Mod

thoughts on ursula, representation, and fat positivity

the other day i was thinking about how few positive fat characters exist in fiction, particularly fat female characters. as a young fat girl growing up in the late 90s/early 00s, the only fat women i can remember having as role models in media were roseanne barr, queen latifah (particularly her role in chicago), and ursula from the little mermaid.

it’s ursula in particular i wanna talk about here, and why she means to much to me.

it’s true that fat characters, particularly fat women, are always villains/antagonists/negative characters. in this, ursula unfortunately follows suit. she’s a villain, she’s a bad person, she’s evil.

but she’s not evil BECAUSE she’s fat. and there are none (that i can remember) of the usual negative fat stereotypes: eats constantly, lazy, greedy, stupid, dirty/messy, desexualised. on the contrary, she’s active, and ambitious, uses sexual innuendo and is aware of sexual appeal (ie, telling ariel to use ~body language~ while moving suggestively). she’s loud and unapologetic, and never tries to shrink herself, she has an Iconic Disney Villain Song.

it only just occurred to me the other day another level to her that i feel explains further why i was so attached to her (in addition to her being a villain; i have always been attached to fictional villains, esp female villains). there’s a line in “poor unfortunate souls”: “…this one longing to be thinner, that one wants to get the girl, and do i help them? yes indeed.” this shows that ursula has the power to make herself thinner, and she doesn’t. she could make herself thin if she wanted to, and she chooses to be fat anyway.

she does have a thin, stereotypically pretty alter ego, vanessa, but being vanessa isn’t her goal. being vanessa is just a means to an end. she uses the vanessa character just to fuck with ariel.

so we’re shown that ursula 1) has the power to actually make herself thinner, and 2) has the power to appear and live as a thin woman for her life. she doesn’t do either.

the idea that a fat woman can live her life as she is, and not have to change into a thin women even if she could, is really really powerful messaging, especially for a young fat girl being programmed to hate herself and change herself into a thin person at all costs.

fat positive representation matters.

anonymous asked:

Your favorite character is the crying dictator who keeps up a human zoo and wanted to shatter ruby?.... please elaborate

i dont like your attitude. but u gave me an option to talk about my fav, so don’t say u didn’t ask for it.

i’m not gonna defend anything she did, cause i think bd suffers a great deal of ignorance. and i dont mean it as ‘she doesnt know what she’s doing’ kind of ignorance. it’s more of a ‘doesn’t really care’ kind of ignorance. here’s what bd cares about (deeply): Pink diamond and her legacy, yellow diamond and herself. she’s still a villain.

what makes her interesting as a villain is why i like her:

1. her emotions are genuine- she doesnt fake being emotional as a part of conning the hero or anything, which is what you usually see with villains in children’s media- especially when showing ‘sympathetic’ emotions such as sadness and mercy.

2. that still doesnt make her a very noble person. some parts of tumblr, the part that sees black and white, might choose to ignore it, but at no point BD does anything that shows she actually cares for anyone other than Pink diamond (and yellow diamond). 

3. she’s not the type of character that usually is given the title villain. and yet she is. and it’s interesting to me.

4. the sharp contrast between her actual personality and the face she’s putting in front of her subjects is amusing to me. 

5. she made me go back full force into the show, and the fandom, after slowly losing interest in it since the ‘In Too Deep’ event.

6. aesthetically speaking- her design, her voice, and everything surrounding her scenes are pleasing to me.

7. she inspires me to make fanart and is the reason im back to uploading art almost consistently now. 

8. i love the dynamic she and YD share.

9. This face: 

10. even if i didnt have all these reasons, im allowed to like whatever character i want.