why can't things work out right

Two things:

- Episode 18 Joshimatsus. Karako stands up in shock when Osoko tells her she bought two unlucky gifts and a theme starts playing. Karako equivalent of Karamatsu’s theme?????? PleASE????
I went back and listened to the previous two Joshi sketches to confirm and while there’s not quite a theme that kicks in when Karako in particular is talking/on-screen, there is a theme there. Here’s hoping!!

- Okay, you know what, damn Episode 18 to hell. I worry about Karamatsu and Ichimatsu on a daily basis because of how they feel and are treated and now I have to worry about them ALL because they’re ALL dying inside. EVERY SINGLE ONE.
When were we ever led to believe that Choro felt unaccepted? Or that Totty felt unnoticed? They really feel like that? Everybody knew damn well how much Kara suffers every week, we all had a pretty good idea about how Ichi REALLY felt under the surface, but now Oso is starting to feel like his brothers are the only collective force keeping him on anyone’s mind because he himself is NOT WELL LIKED AT ALL and it’s breaking his heart. It’s making him fight to the very end of the world, literally, to stay the protagonist of his own show because if he isn’t the protagonist no one is going to look twice at him. W h a t t h e h e l l.

To hell with this, to hell with the popularity polls and character support blogs.
MATSUNO DEFENCE SQUAD GO!

PROTECT THEM ALL.

Study Tips

A lot of the study tips I see aren’t always that great for how I work. So I guess these are tips that help for me. To help get around mental health issues (like having no energy from depression or getting overwhelmed from anxiety). They don’t always work me because I do still need to put effort in to actually do these things and I don’t always do that, but when you do them, they help.

1. Start assignments early. I know every study guide says this but it’s usually in a get as much done as early as you can which isn’t always great, it seems way too early, too much to do when your deadline is so far away so you never get around to it. Plus starting is the hardest thing to do, so if you can get it going before you get too stressed that’s great. But do it in little steps. Which feeds into:

2. Break it all down into little tasks. Like really little tasks. It depends on what kind of assignment you have with how you go about it. I have a lot of essays that require research. So it’ll be broken down into pick a topic, figure out the broader themes of what I want to talk about (you might need to do research before this first and will probably be revised after you’ve done more), find some resources, read and summarise those resources one at a time, plan what each paragraph needs to say, figure out what resources support those, write a paragraph at a time, intros and conclusions, editing. Etc. If you start early, these things don’t get overwhelming. I’ll get one tiny step done between episodes of a tv show, so it doesn’t feel like a massive ton of work at once but it still gets done. Sometimes I just write a sentence or two at a time. Not so great close to deadlines, but early on, not a problem. I got my first assignment in this semester that wasn’t a rush at the end of the deadline and it was amazing not feeling so incredible stressed the day it was due.

3. Follow essay plans. These things are so useful. They seem really cliche but it’s because there’s a way essays work. Intros: Snazzy intro sentence (you can always work on this), summarise what you’re going to talk about (you can even just say I’m going to show this by talking about this (though be wary of if there are preference for first or third person in your writing), paragraphs (topic sentence to introduce the point, evidence supporting that point from your research, connecting sentence to next point) and conclusion (summing up what you’ve said again, but in a more definite way because you’ve shown it now by what’s come before).

4. Accept that there are going to be days that suck. if you’re ahead, you might be able to accept that, if you’re not, you might have to work anyway to get things done. It depend on deadlines, but sometimes change what you plan to get done that day. Find things you can do with less pressure. On terrible days I just try to revise lectures or do readings, depending on how in depth this stuff is. Basically things that require a bit less effort or thinking. So then they’re out of the way when you can focus again. And you will feel a bit better for having gotten something done.

5. Know what your flaws are. One of mine is that I use sentences that are way too long. I don’t bother with this in first drafts, I just have an editing session that looks only for that. I cover topics too broadly at times, trying to cover all aspects of a question instead of specific points in depth. 

6. Check feedback. I hate doing this because I hate seeing what I’ve done wrong but it really is necessary. It’s how I know what my flaws mentioned above are. I didn’t realise I had problems with that until I saw it written as feedback.

7. First drafts don’t have to be great. I see this said a lot for fiction writing but not so much for schoolwork. But just get the info down. Make it readable later. Use headings and dot points if that helps! (it probably will help you find what you’ve written easier) Remove the headings later and turn those dot points into sentences. If you don’t quite know the right word for something at the time, highlight it so you can come back and fix it later.

8. Don’t take online classes unless you have to. The pressure of going to class can help you to keep up with your work. 

9. Don’t take early morning classes. They seem like a good idea when you sign up because then you can get it out of the way and get on with your day. But when you wake up and you just want more sleep, if that class isn’t necessary, you’re not going to go. 

10. Attend your classes. A lot seem pointless to be there. Lectures get recorded. Your tutor may ramble and take two hours for something you can cover on your own in half an hour, but they might also give tips about assignments, you’ve got a better environment to talk to peers, etc. And it’s easier to approach teaching staff if you’ve shown up enough for them to recognise you (not that I’m ever brave enough to do this, but I know I’d be more likely to approach the people I don’t feel guilty about having missed their classes).