why be socially responsible

phoenix-feminist  asked:

Please mentor me and teach how to start becoming a witch!!!

That’s…That’s a TALL order, honey. Seriously, there are entire volumes written on the subject, and I can only speak from my own experience.

What I can do is offer you the advice I’d give to any new witch, direct you to my website (I’m trying to add as much resource material as I can), and let you know that my inbox is open for any questions you might have. (I made a post here about my specialties and the subjects on which I can answer questions.)

The best thing to do when you’re starting is to do lots of research. Look into the different philosophies and religions under the pagan umbrella. Talk to witches here on tumblr, get a first-hand account of their practices if they’ll allow it.

Read blogs and articles and field guides about herbs and trees. Become aware of the social issues facing the pagan community. Discover why there is no such thing as “black” magic and why there are some formerly common words (g*psy, spirit animal, smudging, totem, chakra, karma, etc.) which you should never use improperly again. Learn about cultural appropriation and why you should never, ever do it. Make yourself socially aware and socially responsible.

Learn about yourself. Discover what speaks to you. Develop your own set of beliefs, your own set of practices. Understand and accept that these can and will change as you continue to learn. Understand that witchcraft is a practice, not a religion, but that you can apply religion to it, if that is your wish.

Be aware when you look for book sources that a lot of authors in pagan literature are coming from a Wiccan or Neo-Wiccan viewpoint. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it’s important to know, and it’s important to read critically. Steer clear of books by D.J. Conway, Laurie Cabot, Margaret Murray, Edain McCoy, Silver RavenWolf, Ana Riva, and most theory-based books by Scott Cunningham and Kate West. These have been known to be problematic and rife with incorrect information.

And remember: Not all witches follow the Wiccan Rede.

My website has a page of source material that I refer to frequently, and a page of online resources for supplies, e-texts, and witch-owned etsy shops. There are also downloadable spreadsheets listing the magical uses of several hundred types of herbs, flowers, and other plants on the Plant Magic page. (I don’t claim to be an expert, I’m just sharing what I’ve learned.)

Respect your fellow practitioners, no matter what deities they do or do not follow. That includes the Satanists, the Luciferians, the Lokeans, the Christopagans, the secular witches, and the atheists too. Do not knock it because you don’t understand it. Expect that as a new practitioner you’re going to catch some flack if you make a mistake. Don’t take it personally. Consider your mistakes to be valuable learning opportunities. If you’re in the wrong and an apology is called for, make one. Learn from that too.

There is no one right way of being a witch or practicing witchcraft. There are only three hard and fast rules:

  1. Be respectful of the beliefs and practices of others, even when you don’t agree with them. (That includes not forcing your beliefs on others.)
  2. Never stop learning, always seek more knowledge and experience than you had yesterday.
  3. Don’t be an asshole.

Discovering your area of expertise may not happen right away; some specialties only come with time. There are three things you can do to help yourself along the way:

  1. EXPLORE - Read. Network. Talk to people. Find out about all kinds of shit you can do with magic. Find out what types of magic interest you. Find out which types of magic are appropriate for you to be practicing (be careful not to take things from closed cultures or religions).
  2. LEARN - Make a list of magical things that pique your interest. Study up on those things. Talk to people who include those things in their practices and see if they’re willing to give you some advice. Build up a knowledge base.
  3. PRACTICE - If it holds your interest through all the studying, give it a try. Start with the basics and hone your skills. See if it feels right. If it does, keep at it. If not, move on to the next thing.

If you’re going to work with herbs, definitely get your hands on some medical books and field guides. It helps to be able to identify the plants and also to be aware of any health risks associated with using or handling them. Here are a few that I recommend:

  • The Complete Guide to Herbal Medicines (Fetrow & Avila)
  • Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs (Rodale Press)
  • Western Medicinal Plants & Herbs (Peterson Field Guides)

*surveys post* Yeah, that should be good to get you started.

One last thing: family situations.

While it’s important to have pride in yourself and to not be ashamed of being a witch, it’s also important to maintain your personal safety. If you are in a situation where you honestly feel that you could be harmed or evicted for openly practicing witchcraft, then either find a safe space elsewhere for your physical practices, restrict yourself to non-physical practices (i.e. meditation and studying), or don’t practice until you’re in a place where it’s safe to do so. I don’t generally encourage lying, but if lying, even by omission, if going to keep your skin whole, then do it.

Stay safe and good luck, witchling!

Why is it suddenly the responsibility of social media and corporations to censor what your child sees on the Internet.

Are you a parent or aren’t you? Do YOUR fucking job, don’t make everyone else babysit your kid for you. The internet was never supposed to be a safe playground or baby proofed for kids.

They have safe mode and filters and parental controls for a reason, USE THEM.



Originally posted by queen-m4rceline

Iris had arrived at the Lake Grimstone compound the day before, but today was the day she decided she was going to reach out and meet people. Since her parents were no longer her housemates she didn’t have any more late-night obligatory how-was-your-day conversations. Without those Iris was quite certain she’d no longer meet the minimum requirement of socializing that kept a person sane. Only problem was, she’d made very few friends in her lifetime and those connections had been few and far between. In fact it had been so long since she’d made a friend she wasn’t even sure how to start.

A friend was a big commitment, you had to make time in your social schedule for them, offer emotional support, and share your views on controversial things. How did one build up trust and prove their conversational worthiness through one encounter sufficiently to merit that? The pressure was enough to make her sweat. Iris was sort of hoping the universe would just throw her a bone and drop a friend right into her lap. Then, as if she’d been heard, she noticed a person walking along the path near her dorm. Be they potential future friend, enemy, rival, partner in crime, or unfortunate eccentric acquaintance, she was ready to meet them.

Iris jerked a hand out and gave a stiff wave, instantly regretting the action, but unable to take it back.

“Hi, uh,” she choked out, coughing as her throat tightened in response to mild social-anxiety. Why had she had she thought it would be a good idea to seek out a stranger? She didn’t know this person and they probably didn’t want to know her. Did she give up and awkwardly walk back into her dorm or should she try to persevere?

Trying to work through the awkwardness, she tucked a strand of hair behind her ear, deciding that she probably couldn’t make it worse. “D-do you think you could give me a hand with something?”

In Light of Some Discourse That Has Found Its Way on My Dash...

Let me make something clear as both an original writer and a fanfiction writer: critiques aren’t things that you’re required to accept. At the end of the day, no one has the right or the authority to tell you what to do. Now your relationship with accepting or rejecting critiques can vary greatly depending on the situation you’re in (i.e. being a novice fanfiction writer vs. being an aspiring writer being given edits from an editor that can be the difference between getting published and throwing your manuscript out). But at the end of the day, it’s your work, so it’s always your decision what happens to it.

Now, that being said: writers have a responsibility to do their characters, their settings, and their subject matter justice. This is because you are creating media that is being consumed by the public, and this consumption of media may and can have societal implications.

You are not required to change your story if it’s seeped in harmful stereotypes about a group of people. However, you certainly cannot become defensive when consumers notify you of the harmful stereotypes that you have put into your writing. Now assuming that you are a socially responsible and ethical creator of content, the mature thing to do would be to acknowledge your shortcomings (especially if the criticism concerns subject matter you are not an expert on) and to make attempts to correct the errors of your writing.

What you shouldn’t do is fall back on the common attitude “my writing I’ll do what I want with it.”

No. A thousand times no.

Whether you’re writing fanfiction or publishing a book, you have to realize that any creative content you release is going to have implications on the audiences that read them. This is especially true when it comes to writing about cultures, identities, and lived experiences different from your own. Your words have implications on the lived experiences of these cultures and identities, especially if they perpetuate harmful stereotypes or blatant pieces of misinformation. You words have the power to offend and anger people. When you find yourself in the position of angering and offending people because you have misrepresented their lived experiences, your job isn’t to get defensive.

Your job is to acknowledge their feelings and acknowledge the impact your words have caused.

This is why research is important. This is why cultural competency is important. This is why social responsibility is important.

If you’re writing about a culture, identity, or lived experience that you know nothing about, obviously it is impossible to understand every single thing about that subject matter. But it should be your responsibility as a responsible writer to understand and learn as much as you possibly can. Attempts at accuracy should be important for writers. And I understand, depending on your skill level and access to information, it is often difficult to attain this accuracy yourself.

This is why listening to critiques is so important.

When another person’s culture/identity/lived experience is at stake, you should expect anger and annoyance. Because it doesn’t feel good to read representations of your lives and see them depicted incorrectly, no matter how big or small the error, and it feels even worse to have your corrections and offers for information stomped on and ignored because “it’s not your writing.”

If someone tells you you’ve misrepresented the lived experiences of queer people despite all of your research, listen to them. Talk to other queer people, learn about what you’ve done wrong, and make the personal decision to do your research better the next time around and provide a more positive depiction of queer communities in the future.

Lack of resources or lack of access to information does not excuse incorrect or unrepresentative writing.

Your words have an impact, and you need to recognize that impact. If you can’t do online research, read other representative pieces of writing. Talk to people. Reach out to more experienced writers. Hell, maybe come to the understanding that you might have to make certain aspects of your story vague or eliminate them altogether because you do not know enough about a subject matter to write honestly on it.

This takes practice. This takes experience. This takes time and patience. But it is something that needs to be taken seriously. 

Now, that being said, this is not a direct attack on anyone. I’m purposefully not answering the post that inspired this and I’m purposefully not tagging anyone in it. These are my own thoughts as both a reader and a writer about a topic that has always and will continue to be important to me and it angers me when people choose to treat it lightly and carelessly.

Good day. 

Tumblr Tuesday: Civil Rights and Equality Edition

Black Girls Talking
Official Tumblr of the pop culture podcast featuring four black girls talking. Hitting play feels like you’ve crashed the slumber party of four super smart women who care.

Gradient Lair
For and about black women in media. Featuring a stand-out womanist-perspective essay on the surprise Beyoncé album.

Why Be Socially Responsible?
“Social responsibility?” you ask. “What’s in it for me?” you ask. Stop asking questions and start fulfilling your obligation to humanity. We are all connected, ya bozo. 

Kid President
Kid President’s rules are all golden: “Before you say something about the barbecue sauce on somebody else’s shirt—you should take a look at the barbecue sauce on your own shirt.”

Photo by Blake Bolinger

42t0nes  asked:

Hello doll! I'm very new, and completely inexperienced when it comes to the craft. Although strangely enough I find myself extremely drawn to it, what are the basics & how do I begin my practice?

Hello, little witchling! I’m not sure how to go about answering your question, since there are literally entire books written on this subject and without a better understanding of what path you’re drawn to, it’s difficult to give advice. “The basics” differ slightly depending on what type of craft you wish to practice and which witch you ask about it. Ask ten witches about the basics of witchcraft, and you will get ten different answers. However, I can give you the stock advice that I would give to any new witch:

The best thing to do when you’re starting is to do lots of research. Look into the different philosophies and religions under the pagan umbrella. Talk to witches here on tumblr, get a first-hand account of their practices if they’ll allow it.

Read blogs and articles and field guides about herbs and trees. Become aware of the social issues facing the pagan community. Discover why there is no such thing as “black” magic and why there are some formerly common words (g*psy, spirit animal, smudging, totem, chakra, karma, etc.) which you should never use improperly again. Learn about cultural appropriation and why you should never, ever do it. Make yourself socially aware and socially responsible.

Learn about yourself. Discover what speaks to you. Develop your own set of beliefs, your own set of practices. Understand and accept that these can and will change as you continue to learn. Understand that witchcraft is a practice, not a religion, but that you can apply religion to it, if that is your wish.

Be aware when you look for book sources that a lot of authors in pagan literature are coming from a Wiccan or Neo-Wiccan viewpoint. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it’s important to know, and it’s important to read critically. Steer clear of books by D.J. Conway, Laurie Cabot, Margaret Murray, Edain McCoy, Silver RavenWolf, Ana Riva, and most theory-based books by Scott Cunningham and Kate West. These have been known to be problematic and rife with incorrect information.

And remember: Not all witches follow the Wiccan Rede.

All of the following are on my bookshelf and I recommend them for basic reference:

  • Garden Witchery (Ellen Dugan)
  • Garden Witches’ Herbal (Ellen Dugan)
  • The Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes
  • Grimoire for the Green Witch (Ann Moura - critical reading needed)
  • Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs (Scott Cunningham - same)
  • The Complete Guide to Herbal Medicines (Fetrow & Avila)
  • Rodale’s Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs
  • Western Medicinal Plants & Herbs (Peterson Field Guides)

If you’re going to work with herbs, definitely get your hands on some medical books and field guides. It helps to be able to identify the plants and also to be aware of any health risks associated with using or handling them.

If you don’t have occult shops or can’t find supplies locally, here are some websites with good reliable products and reasonable prices:

  • The Magickal Cat - general supplies, stones, herbs, books, etc.
  • Baba’s Cupboard - general supplies, stones, herbs, books, etc. [Tumblr witch owned and operated]
  • Starwest Botanicals - bulk herbs, loose teas, and tea-making supplies [Get your muslin sachets and press-and-seal tea bags here!]
  • Ruth Roy’s Wellcat Herbs - herbs, spices, teas, and incense [I personally recommend this one. I go to Ruth Roy once a year at the PA Ren Faire for those hard-to-find items and I’m always impressed with the quality of her products.]
  • Mountain Rose Herbs - herbs and incense
  • 100 Candles - candles of all sorts
  • Specialty Bottle - glass and plastic bottles, crocks, and jars [Bulk rates on everything, just be careful of shipping prices for higher quantities, it adds up fast.]

There is no one right way of being a witch or practicing witchcraft. There are only three hard and fast rules:

  1. Be respectful of the beliefs and practices of others, even when you don’t agree with them. (That includes not forcing your beliefs on others.)
  2. Never stop learning, always seek more knowledge and experience than you had yesterday
  3. Don’t be an asshole.

I also run a sideblog over at Witch In A Pinch, which deals with cheap and easy witchcraft for beginners or those with a tight budget. If you get stuck or need specific advice, my inbox is always open.

Best of luck!

A Year Every Minute Pt. 13

A story centered around the lives of Gaster, Sans, and Papyrus from beginning to end. Themes will be both happy and tragic.


Putting off talking to Sans about his origins until he was well was only a temporary solution. As soon as the child started to feel better he continued to ask about it, Gaster always postponing it until he no longer could. After a few days without any coughing or sniffling, Sans finally put his slippered foot down and approached the doctor sat hunched over his work.

“dings, i’ve felt better for like… two days now. when are you going to tell me about my parents?”

Keep reading

42 Character Development Questions - Ameline Edition

Reply or send me an ask with any number(s) and I will answer them :)

PHYSICAL PRESENCE AND GESTURE.
1. How do they move and carry themselves? Pace, rhythm, gestures, energy?
2. How much physical space do they use, active and at rest?
3. How do they position themselves in a group? Do they like to be the center of attention, or do they hang back at the edges of a crowd?
4. What is their size and build? How does it influence how they use their body, if it does?
5. How do they dress? What styles, colors, accessories, and other possessions do they favor? Why?
6. What are they like in motion–in different environments, and in different activities? What causes the differences between these?
7. How do they physically engage with other people, inanimate objects, and their environment? What causes the differences between these?
8. Where and when do they seem most and least at ease? Why? How can you tell?
9. How do they manifest energy, exhaustion, tension, or other strong emotions?
10. What energizes and drains them most?
11. How are they vocally expressive? What kind of voice, accent, tones, inflections, volume, phrases and slang, and manner of speaking do they use?
12. How are they bodily expressive? How do they use nonverbal cues such as their posture, stance, eyes, eyebrows, mouths, and hands?


DISPOSITION AND TEMPERAMENT.
13. How do they greet the world — what is their typical attitude towards life? How does it differ in different circumstances, or towards different subjects? Why do they take these attitudes, and why do they change? How do these tend to be expressed?
14. What do they care deeply about? What kind of loyalties, commitments, moral codes, life philosophies, passions, callings, or spirituality and faith do they have? How do these tend to be expressed?
15. What kind of inner life do they have — rich and imaginative? Calculating and practical? Full of doubts and fears? Does it find any sort of outlet in their lives?
16. Do they dream? What are those dreams like?
17. Are they more shaped by nature or nurture — who they are, or what has happened to them? How have these shaped who they’ve become as a person?
18. What kind of person could they become in the future? What are some developmental paths that they could take, (best, worst, most likely?) what would cause them to come to pass, and what consequences might they have? What paths would you especially like to see, and why?


CONNECTIONS WITH OTHERS.
19. How do they behave within a group? What role(s) do they take? Does this differ if they know and trust the group, versus finding themselves in a group of strangers? Why?
20. What kind of individual relationships do they have with others, and how do they behave in them? How are they different between intimate relationships like friends, family, and lovers versus more impersonal relationships?
21. What kind of relationships do they tend to intentionally seek out versus actually cultivate? What kind of social contact do they prefer, and why?
22. How do people respond to them, and why might these responses differ?
23. How do they respond to difficult social moments? What makes them consider a social situation difficult?
24. How do they present themselves socially? What distinguishes their “persona” from their “true self”, and what causes that difference?
25. What do they need and want out of relationships, and how do they go about getting it?
26. How do they view and feel about relationships, and how might this manifest in how they handle them, if it does?


ACTIVITIES AND PREFERENCES.
27. What do they strongly like and dislike, in any category? Why?
28. What are they likely to do if they have the opportunity, resources, and time to accomplish it? Why?
29. What kind of activities, interests, and hobbies do they have? What significance and impact do these have in their lives, both positive and negative?
30. What is their preferred level of activity and stimulation? How do they cope if they get either too little or too much?
31. Is there anything that counts as a “dealbreaker” for them, positively or negatively? What makes things go smoothly, and what spoils an activity or ruins their day? Why?
32. Do they have any “props” that are a significant part of their life, identity, activities, or self-presentation somehow? What are they, how are they used, and why are they so significant? How would these props’ absence impact them, how would they compensate, and why?


THINKING AND LEARNING.
33. How do they learn about the world–what is their preferred learning style? Hands-on learning with trial and error? Research, reading, and note-taking? Observation or rote memorization? Inductive or deductive reasoning? Seeking patterns and organization? Taking things apart and putting them back together? Creative processing via discussing, writing about, or dramatizing things?
34. How do they understand the world–what kind of worldview and thought processes do they have? Why?
35. How and why do they internalize knowledge? What effect has that had on them?
36. How much do they rely on their minds and intellect, versus other approaches like relying on instinct, intuition, faith and spirituality, or emotions? What is their opinion on this?
37. Have they had any special education or training that colors their means of learning about or understanding the world? Conversely, do they lack some kind of education considered essential in their world? What kind of impact has this addition or lack had on them?
38. Is there anything they wish they could change about their worldview or thought processes? What, and why?
39. What sort of questions or thoughts recur in their lives, either specifically or as a theme? Why are these never answered, or answered permanently to their satisfaction?
40. What do they wonder about? What sparks their curiosity and imagination, and why? How is this expressed, if it is?


FREE FOR ALL.
41. What associations do they bring to mind? Words or phrases, images, metaphors or motifs? Why?
42. I have a question of my own!

stop making excuses.

one thing I hate about the art world is the acceptance of the idea of an apolitical “aesthetic appreciation” of literally anything.

suddenly men aren’t simply drawing busty pinup girls because of their sexual objectification of them, they are simply “expressing their appreciation for a certain aesthetic.” bullshit! bull! shit!
the same fucking power dynamics of sexual objectification of women, misogyny in art, REMAINS as long as you replicate it’s conditions and actions!

ripping off of traditional, fine, pop, and folk art from any subaltern/marginalized/foreign peoples you, a white and/or western person, consider ~exotic,~ or ~trendy,~ is not suddenly ok because you fall back on the rhetoric of “inspiration” and “borrowing aesthetics from everywhere.” there are material and ideological consequences for your art! you must, MUST take responsibility for the effects your art will have on people or you have abandoned social responsibility in your work.
Why would you accept social responsibility in social settings, i.e. manners politeness appropriateness etc, yet leave it at the roadside when it comes to what you are putting tons of work and passion into?!

art is still a social interaction!
you must take responsibility for your social impact in art in the same respect that you must take responsibility for your social impact in all other areas of your life!

If you have some sort of “aesthetic appreciation” for Nazi Germany, you must without hesitation examine how this identical behavior manifests in neo-nazis! You must without hesitation ruthlessly self-interrogate! You must, in your analysis, consider the conditions and perspectives of the Holocaust, Jewish people, the German state, contemporary holocaust deniers, neo-nazis, and many more variables!

Nothing is politically neutral!

If you have some “aesthetic appreciation” for ‘lolicon’, 'shotacon,’ or other forms of child pornography, then you must without any hesitation research and listen and internalize the perspectives of child sexual assault survivors of all nationalities, japanese child sexual assault survivors, and many more variables and important historical perspectives on this issue! This is not a “politically neutral” subject or a “total fantasy!” Fiction is not a category that is “separate” from Reality! People are deeply influenced by media they consume!

No art or aesthetic is pure or etherial or fantastical in essence! Those are interpretive categorizations applied to them! In a real material sense all fiction is produced by people who are inherently fundamentally rooted in the material world, as are all audience for any media, as are all results of all profits from all media!

If you have some sort of “aesthetic appreciation” for trannies, ladyboys, traps, futa, futanari, dickgirls, femmeboys, girlyboys, chicks with dicks, hermaphrodites, ET FUCKING CETERA, Then you have got to do some fucking reading and listening and discussion about transmisogyny and intersexism as soon as humanly possible! You must seek the perspectives of people psychologically victimized by these types of media and internalize their experiences! You must try your hardest to analyze the fetishization of trans women, the biological essentialism, the misogyny, the intersexism, the implicit messages that this media is sending! You must self-interrogate and identify ideas you have incepted and replicated as a result of your consumption of these types of media!

Your mind is not a steel-affixed perfect clear lens that perceives the world and media “as it is!” Your mind has uncountable implicit biases and presumptions that you are ignorant of!
But your mind is also malleable! You have the capacity to learn new information! You have the capacity to learn new habits! Your mind can change and develop from where it is now, just as it has already changed and developed from when you were an infant!

If you hear that something is problematic or offensive, neither accept it ignorantly nor reject it ignorantly! Investigate, listen, read, analyze, self-criticize, consider the source, research research research! do not be content and stop reading once you find a viewpoint you already agree with! the only way to grow is to challenge your preconceptions! Acknowledge that you are not neutral, you are never neutral! When you get a “gut feeling,” interrogate what ideology is producing that! Nothing is non-ideological!

Oh hai, Tumblr!

We’re interrupting your regularly-scheduling reblogs to share some exciting news - you may have noticed that we’ve got a new intern helping us out on the ole NPR Tumblr, and she’s pretty awesome so we want to officially introduce you to her. Everyone, meet Vesta:

Hi! I come to D.C. in ✌ from the perpetually summery, concrete- & palm-tree- bound metropolis of Los Angeles. I just graduated from UCLA with a degree in Film, Television and Digital Media. I spent an intense couple years there developing my voice as a storyteller and mediamaker (film/digital/Web).

I always had a hunch, though, that working in Hollywood wasn’t the right fit for me. So I tried it out and realized I was right. I don’t like traditional film production or Hollywood’s gravitation toward lucrative blockbusters. I love nonfiction storytelling and socially responsible media. That’s why I chose the concentration I did (“interpretive” — a fancy word for experimental — digital media) and dedicated my senior year to researching, coding and filming Greenspaces, a participatory media installation in Los Angeles.

I'm here now, delving into creative possibilities at the intersection of social tech & storytelling. I like art, film, food, and fluffy things. 

…and while we’re at it, we thought this would be a good time to formally introduce ourselves, your NPR Tumblr mavens/webmasters/writers of terrible puns!

So hi, I’m Ariel, and I’m a photo editor for NPR.org. I used to work here, and I helped start this, and I’m a big fan of this lil gal. Also, people tell me a *lot* of Little Mermaid jokes… you know, bc of the name or whatever.

Originally posted by disneyboost

Hiya, I’m Emily and I’m a producer for NPR.org (and I sit right next to Ariel)! I started at NPR as an intern four years ago and before that I interned here and here. I love dogs but I’m highly allergic to them, so dog GIFs are perfect for my lifestyle.

Originally posted by animalgifdaily

It may not seem like it sometimes, but we do read every piece of mail y’all send our way. So while we’ve got your attention, we thought we’d *also* address the most common message we get from you guys:

“Tagging your name to every comment is clearly the mark of a person over 40.“

Fun fact: Despite our penchant to reblog cute animals and the latest trend in knitting, we’re actually not 40! FWIW, we’re all solidly millennials and [mostly] digital natives. We like to sign our posts here (unlike on our personal Tumblrs) so y’all know who’s reblogging what, and who’s making which bad jokes. (Emily’s jokes are way better than mine. -Ariel) (That’s debatable. -Emily)

Originally posted by spoopylitus

So send us more notes, tell us what you like and don’t like, and *definitely* check us on our old-lady style. This is why we love you guys.

-Ariel, Emily, & Vesta

People talk about personal responsibility being the solution for the black community as if black people are a monolithic group but the minute you ask for the police to be held accountable and have a little personal responsibility in police involved shootings, especially when it’s caused by racial profiling, they come out there talking about how not all cops are bad, how cops can’t be held responsible, finding every excuse as to why the cops were right to kill. 

I’d really like for anyone who thinks “social constructs” are inherently bad to go without any social constructs for a week.

No money. No job. No Internet or phone. No movies, TV, music, or print. No friendship, no family. No house, no clothes, no language.

At the end of that week, then we can talk about gender and sex as social constructs.

I can only presume that by then you’d understand that me saying “sex is a social construct” is NOT the same thing as me saying “sex is a lie”, and that you’d likewise understand why, when you say “gender is a social construct”, my response is “So…?”

And if not—OK then. Go back to living without social constructs.

Go on, enjoy grunting naked in the weeds, free of all social constructs. I’m sure you’ll love it.

christin4-mari3-deactivated2016  asked:

LMAO I had an eating disorder and was in the hospital because I was DYING. I would LOVE to have money for surgery to change my body. It is "necessary" for my well being cause if I had the money I could make the changes to my body instead of being sick and dying!! Well that's not how life works buddy. Get the FUCK over yourself. You fucking asshole. You sound so selfish. People need that kind of money for shit like open heart surgery. Do you know how childish you sound? You are scum&should DIE

trans people having fundraisers to treat sex dysphoria is not only a major cause of starvation in the world, but a major cause of lack of access to medical care, apparently.

why aren’t these people yelling at billionaires who actually have the resources to change stuff but instead actively perpetuate the system responsible for violent social inequality. why do they yell at a transsexual prostitute with $5,000 instead. i wonder

  • Cis woman calls another cis woman a bitch: Happens frequently during arguments.
  • Trans woman calls a cis woman a bitch: Cis woman reproduces "The Transsexual Empire" in response, says that male socialization is why this happens, basically throws a huge fit.
  • Me: Not a fan of "bitch" as an insult but come on. A trans woman doing this is no different than a cis woman doing this. If you have to go "OH YEAH? WELL YOU'RE A MAN" in response then you are literally made of shit and should flush yourself down the nearest toilet

ok dudes here’s the deal. ultimately, if you are an adult, you can choose whether or not to wear a helmet. that’s truth. but i wanna let you know some excuses for it that just don’t work

“It looks stupid” y'know it looks kinda stupid when your brain is splattered all over the ground but

“helmets don’t protect the rest of your body so what’s the point!” yes. it doesn’t protect everything so why even bother protecting the most important thing?

“it doesn’t look professional” well see when you are a professional, or when you have a very popular social media account, this is why you have a responsibility. because if you don’t wear a helmet, you are encouraging your younger followers to refuse to wear a helmet even if you never say out loud “helmets are dumb.” They model after you. You have a responsibility and it’s time that helmet look professional.

“helmets are expensive” ok ok i feel that. but even with the bs people say about troxels, they are pretty inexpensive and they will save you from having to pay a hella expensive medical bill.

“i dont want to” well then that’s your decision but just know that it’s an irresponsible and illogical one

WHY BE SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE?
— 

- How about, to avoid global recession!

The credit crisis resulting from the bursting of the housing bubble is — according to general consensus — the primary cause of the 2007–2009 recession in the United States.

This credit crises was brought about by irresponsible real estate lenders making mortgage deals they knew were not sustainable. Taking part in risky practices without regard for anyone, or anything.

Result… a global recession that every individual on this planet now has to deal with every day!