whwt

anonymous asked:

I'm really curious as to what your opinion is on West Highland White Terriers? I've always wanted one, and I know terriers tend to be healthier than other breeds, but what should I be aware of issues this breed has?

I’m fairly sure all the vetblrs reading this question know what I’m going to say, because it’s very common knowledge about this popular breed, but first the disclaimer:

These posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what your dog is going to encounter in their life.

Originally posted by plutostheory

The West Highland White Terrier, Westie or WHWT for short, is a dynamic and charismatic little breed. Despite being a small breed they’re not fragile, and are reasonably well constructed on the inside.

They are moderately prone to avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can present as a unilateral lameness. Fortunately for dogs this small simply removing the femoral head may be just as effective a treatment as a total hip replacement, and markedly cheaper. We do see a few for multiple cruciate ligament tears, but this is usually in their middle or senior years and usually secondary to doing something like leaping off the verandah after a bird.

Dry Eye (keratoconjunctivitis sica) is reasonably common in these dogs, which is a little surprising as their eye shape is fairly sensible. It’s caused by a lack of tear film production in one or both eyes. Usually this is immune mediated and needs lifelong medication to prevent recurrent corneal ulcers.

Atopy, Allergic Dermatitis, Malasezia Dermatitis and other related skin disorders are what the breed is most well known for in veterinary circles. So much so that the WHWT is the dog most likely to feature on any info pamphlets handed out to vet clinics about new skin products or treatments.

You ever see these pure white dogs with bronze/brown staining n their feet, belly, groin? That’s because they’re so itchy, they lick and chew themselves so often, that they have stained their skin and fur with their own saliva. That takes an awful lot of licking.

If the cause of the dog’s itch is an infection, and yeast infections are very common in this breed, then controlling the infection should control the itch, but it’s not that simple and rarely that simple) if the dog also has an allergic component. Dogs can be allergic to anything in their environment, including the yeast infection on their skin.

This is one of the reasons dogs with chronic skin disease, like the WHWT, can be so frustrating to treat. Almost every dog of this breed I’ve encountered has had some sort of skin issue.

As these dogs get older, they do seem to be a little more prone to pancreatitis, hepatitis and diabetes mellitus. I have to wonder whether these conditions are associated in any way with the prednisolone most of these dogs live on for several months each year. It will be interesting to see if the frequency of these conditions change with the advent of new, different anti-allergy medication.

Oh, and recently the West highland White Terrier was suggested to be the breed seen most often for esophageal foreign body obstruction. That means it’s being seen in veterinary practice as the breed most likely to attempt to swallow something whole, and getting it stuck in its esophagus. Whether this is a breed predisposition or not, I can’t disagree with the hypothesis because a full half of dogs I’ve seen with objects stuck in their esophagus have been WHWTs, distinctly more than any other breed.

Whether this is a testament to the breed’s stubbornness despite its small size could be debated.

This is not an exhaustive list, but it is what I see most commonly in practice.

(liberals after seeing a flyer about socialism in a public place) i jjsut feel,, sso threaynted… whwt if thye break the winddow of starbcujks while imm drinkingn my latte,,

imagine shizuo living in a house in a secluded area with not a lot of people and a lot of grass, trees, and flowers. he sits outside and listens to the sound of gushing water in a nearby river. celty, kasuka, and his other friends visit a lot and bring him pudding. he smiles more and he’s finally not afraid, he’s at peace.

zooxanthele  asked:

I'm sure you have a long waiting list going, but could you do a breed health post on Cairn terriers? :3

They’re fairly uncommon here, and these dogs are very similar to the West Highland White Terrier, but I can give you a brief overview based on my experience.

Please note the disclaimer. These posts are about the breed from a veterinary viewpoint as seen in clinical practice, i.e. the problems we are faced with. It’s not the be-all and end-all of the breed and is not to make a judgement about whether the breed is right for you. If you are asking for an opinion about these animals in a veterinary setting, that is what you will get. It’s not going to be all sunshine and cupcakes, and is not intended as a personal insult against your favorite breed. This is general advice for what is common, often with a scientific consensus but sometimes based on personal experiences, and is not a guarantee of what your animal is going to encounter in their life.

Originally posted by fuckyeahcairnterriers

Atopy and allergies are extraordinarily common in the WHWT and also common in the Cairn Terrier. The Cairn is not as popular as the WHWT, and if it was I suspect we’d see them on more advertising for allergy products too.

Mitral valve dysplasia is a common heart condition of smaller dogs, and the Cairn is no exception. While it’s usually older dogs that are afflicted, it is reasonable common and this heart condition is managed, not cured.

Lion jaw, or craniomandibular osteopathy, is uncommon but when it does show up, it seems to be often in these dogs. This genetic condition causes abnormal bone growth to occur on the lower jaw, sometimes becoming severe enough to prevent proper opening and closing of the jaw. This usually occurs in younger dogs.

Portosystemic shunt is also relatively rare but shows up with increased frequency in this breed. In this condition there is an abnormal blood vessel that bypasses the liver, resulting in a whole host of symptoms including stunted growth, an underdeveloped liver and a range of neurological symptoms. Some pups are treatable with surgery, but it’s not a routine procedure.

Luxating patellas are also reasonably common, as they are in many small breeds. The severity of the condition will determine whether an affected dog would benefit from surgery.

1/19 This is a very accurate photo of my mornings. I like to journal, plan my day, drink coffee, and read the NYTimes or blogs on my iPad. My dog usually decides to join me.

I’ve always wanted to keep a journal but it has never clicked until this year…so far. My professor talked about how she struggled with journaling over the years but finally got it when someone told her she was making it too complicated and to just have a goal of writing at least 3 sentences a day. I’ve been taking this approach and so far so good. It is so much less pressure. I recommend if you have trouble journaling as well.

virulentslacker  asked:

A few months back i was putting the rubbish out on the night before collection day, and while i was walking back down my really long, unlit driveway i saw this thing. It was a lanky humanoid, seven foot tall from ground to shoulder with arms reaching its knees. Its limbs were super thing but widened at the wrist, and its fingers touched the ground. Its skin was a rusty, dark brown. Whwt really weirds me out is the "head" (1)

It was like an upside down cone, or pyramid, i’m not sure. It started at the shoulders, where the neck should be, and broadened out gradually, stretching above the roofs nearby. It had no features, nothing like a face. But i felt it turn and look at me. I stared at it, blinked, and it was gone. The scary thing is, the moon, the stars and the clouds had all shifted, and when i came back inside, ten minutes had passed. Even though, as far as i know, i only saw it for a moment (2)

I have a crystal clear image of it. I think it communicated with me but whatever happened, i have no memory. The only thing i know for sure is that before it saw me, it was staring at the moon, and it seemed sad. I’m not afraid of it, but i feel bad for the creature, i think it’s lost, or lonely, maybe because the people it talks to forget what they talked about. I kinda hope i see it again one day. (3)


this is very bizarre, i havent heard of many stories like it at all