whose economy is it

what white people think racism is: when you mean to someone because of their race

what racism really is: social and legal systems that puts a race beneath another, vilifying them, fetishizing them, sexualizing them, and creates a usually negative bias towards that group.

where childhood is not an option when you’re the villain or where you are always seen at a child’s level no matter your age

where you are always responsible if someone else says/does something racist towards you, because existing invites aggression somehow

where you do not fit beauty standards, because beauty is afforded to the human, and your conditioned low self-esteem lets you know that

where you’re either synonymous with violence, stupidity, or infantilization, because you cannot make your own choices that aren’t irrational.

where your feelings are routinely invalidated and your daily life experiences are not enough evidence and cannot be trusted, because you’re a suspicious character whose humanity is always on trial. so you do not get to define universally what racism is

where you do not get feel anything besides rational at all times, to be carefree or upset or angry without it being a stereotype of you overreacting to everything

where if you fit into a stereotype it could mean your death and the rest of your race tries to put you down as a self-elevating technique, because they have internalized the lie that when you deny your race and culture you become human. where fitting a stereotype means “see i knew they where all like this”

where if you don’t fit into a stereotype you are not your race and culture, because people have such narrow views of what you’re supposed to be that you cannot possibly exist and be your race at the same time, so people of every race take away yours. Oreo. Banana. Coconut. Apple.

where you will legally get more time for the same crimes

where you will socially be demonized more the same crimes

where when you quell the crimes keeping your race down, there are always more that’s made up to keep you in your place (The War on Drugs =_=)

where you get paid less for the same work

where you get hired less with the same qualifications

where having a culturally-coded name that’s not acceptable, like Ibrahim, Jose, or Unique can stop you from getting a job

where there are so many things in place to keep you impoverished and uneducated but it’s still your fault if you don’t have the strength and good luck to defy the lack of social mobility and create your own

where entire countries whose cultures and economies have been destroyed are trying to restart alone and the people that destroyed them blame the country for its own destruction

where the farther your features are from your race the more beautiful you’re considered

where your rank in social hierarchy changes how people treat you the more they find out about your identity, and the more marginalized you are by coming out of the closet or not being christian or not being able-bodied and neurotypical the worse you get racism, because you are a bigger target for various acts of violence and microaggressions

where you get used to microagressions before you hit double digits

where your most recent experience with a microaggression was probably yesterday if the day just started

where you idea of a microaggression is the white summation of racism

where your family teaches you how to assimilate to white culture to try and protect you from all of the above

where your death is an opportunity to blame you for it and demonize you in your grave

where there is a death count just for existing

where there is a death count just for existing

where there is a death count just for existing

anonymous asked:

(part 1) ur gonna roast me for this but im legit curious why mafia AUs are so bad? im asking in a non confrontational way, i get it romanticizing mafia is wrong, but i also believe that 1)most mafia AUs are a really toned down type of mafia;2)they do make for some interesting kinds of dynamics with fanart and with fics; 3)in a fic specifically u can create your own world and call something mafia and still make it so they don't kill innocent people but only idk members of other gangs or sth

(part 2) plus theyre a way to put ur charas in a completely diff context and see what theyll do. i mean i dont believe that writing ships in a certain context (like mafia) equals romanticizing that context. mafia AUs arent even my fav things to read (in fact i almost never do), im sure many ppl romanticize it and i obvs dont agree with that but im just trying to udnerstand bc i believe fandoms are a way to explore things that we normally wouldnt.

I’m not gonna roast you don’t worry xD okay wait let me check if I replied to this already if yes I’m gonna c/p because it’s half past midnight otherwise I’ll just go at it again wait *checks tags* fff obviously I don’t have a general post but anyway pls read this after you’ve done with my post and then this which is also choke-full of links. plus for a (not nice) laugh: here. AH WAIT I FOUND THE POST.

okay, so, let’s have it out of the way: I have nothing against mob aus or crime aus. I have a problem against calling them mafia AUs because in the US mafia = organized crime at large, in Italy mafia = ACTUAL EXISTING ORGANIZATIONS THAT ARE ACTIVELY HARMFUL. now that I introduced the topic I’ll c/p you the reply I gave to another anon who while discussing the issue pointed out that most writers don’t even know Italian mafia is a thing, which is pretty much on the same discourse so…

*The thing is - in the US it might not be enough of a deal anymore and I honestly do get why people make the mafia = regular mobsters, since the mafia was the first foreign organized crime being exported to the US via italian immigrants (sorry if this sounds horrible in English but I just woke up and I still didn’t have coffee) so I understand that mafia became the umbrella term.But the thing is that - as you said, these people don’t even know that there’s a mafia in Italy anymore or where the word comes from.

 I’m going to link to italiansreclaimingitaly’s tag about the mafia and its perception outside Italy because they posted about this extensively and it’s an excellent resource, but meanwhile I’m gonna do a very short bullet point list and about the topic:

  • Mafia might not be a big deal in the US, but it still is here. We have the beauty of four different mafias (Cosa Nostra - the Sicilian one, camorra which is the one in Campania but has tendrils spread everywhere, the ‘ndrangheta which is in Calabria and the Sacra Corona Unita in Puglia) which are all active [especially camorra and 'ndrangheta] and whose actions have direct impact (negative) on our economy and on our society. Actually mafias are one of the main reasons we’re currently economically fucked up, and if I start talking about how mafia culture keeps some areas literally backwards I could talk about it for three months.
  • There are still people who are killed for standing up against them. These days the most prominent personality is Roberto Saviano who is a writer who dared to put together a book documenting minutely the way camorra works and he’s been living under protection for years by this point. Like, they want him dead because he wrote a book. And I’m sorta sure that he was talking about leaving Italy and going to the US after years of sticking with it here because he can’t take it anymore but I don’t know if it was a taken decision or if it’s still debating it.
  • It wasn’t even thirty years ago that we had the stragi di mafia - in english it’d be something like the mafia slaughters, basically around the beginning of the nineties there were a number of bombs planted by the mafia targeting people who were trying to oppose it including judges Falcone and Borsellino, actually the anniversary of Falcone’s death is like… tomorrow. And they’ve killed people for way longer than that. Here is a list of only Cosa Nostra victims including the ones from the eighties/nineties. And people are still dying because of it. The slaughters I’m referring to are just the ones in the nineties which are enough of a number.
  • They also perpetuate a culture where if you testify against your mafia-employed relatives you’ll be shunned forever. There are women who testified against their families and couldn’t see their children anymore never mind that they weren’t automatically considered a relative anymore the moment they sided against the mafia. Some people have committed suicide after becoming witnesses also because our police force/justice system can be terribly non-supportive in this kind of situation so they got left on their own. Never mind that back in the day - it was the beginning of the nineties? - I recall at least a particular story of - I think, correct me if I remember wrong but I can’t remember the names for the life of me - where this guy testified against the local mafia when he either used to work for them or was forced to pay them the pizzo and in retaliation his six-year old (or five? Anyway he had a son younger than ten for sure) got kidnapped, killed and thrown into acid to dispose of the body. That happened in what, 1993? 1994? It’s pretty much yesterday. And now the camorra is doing the same - there’s a list here of camorra victims among which accidental passerbys that got killed because they were in the way which I can tell just by glancing is not complete. And I’m not even going into the 'ndrangheta. That is to say, here mafia still kills people and cripples our country.

Now, I get that it’s a word, but the point was: let’s say that instead of the Italians the Japanese came to the US first and the umbrella word for organized crime was yakuza rather than mafia and let’s say yakuza was still what it was originally in Japan while in the US it stopped being a big deal and people write yakuza!AU instead of mafia AU. Let’s say someone Japanese gets angry at that and goes like 'listen the yakuza is a real deal it does this this this and that and it’s a plague in our country so can you please at least look it up before writing your fanfic’, which is what had happened way back then when this whole mafia and fanfic thing blew up. A bunch of people told us to get over it because it’s just a word and if it’s a problem in Italy it’s not in the US so why should they care? Now, if we had been Japanese (or Chinese or Russian or Mexican) would they have said the same thing? Considering the general tumblr attitude I’m pretty sure they would have received either an apology or 'this is an important deal let’s keep that in mind’ with signal boost reblogs and stuff. 

It’s the fact that we should get over people not knowing that it’s still a real problem for us and that they can’t take five seconds to google it that is the problem imo. Especially when instead of mafia au you can just say mobsters au or tag it as organized crime and everyone is a lot happier, mostly because as the tag above explains romanticising the mafia is a good thing for them because it means they can act outside Italy with less stigma because everyone thinks that the mafia is dead or not relevant anymore, if I’m explaining myself. (And it’s active outside Italy - like, there was a mafia kill in Germany in 2007 where six people died (sorry the link is in Italian but there isn’t an English wiki page, if you look the city up you’ll find something probably) and it was because of the 'ndrangheta.

I’d really like to not get worked over it because it meant it was a thing of the past y'know, but the problem is that it isn’t and I’d rather spread some awareness in hope some of these writers look it up (because it’s a good thing that people know what mafia is since as stated they have tendrils everywhere - if you read Saviano’s book the entire first chapter is about how camorra regularly deals with Chinese import/export in Italy for one) than shrug and figure that since they’ll think everything is good for fanfic then it’s not even worth my time.*

Now, ^^^ that was the c/p-ed reply that should answer most of your doubts. What I didn’t address was:

im sure many ppl romanticize it and i obvs dont agree with that but im just trying to udnerstand bc i believe fandoms are a way to explore things that we normally wouldnt.

aaaand as we say here in Italy, this is where the donkey falls (sorry we have weird sayings), because in theory there’s nothing wrong with that… except that in 99% of the mafia aus I’ve seen around the thing is that they’re supposed to be cute.

like, I see a lot of shit with TINY MAFIA BOSS STEVE ROGERS with RUSSIAN ENFORCER BUCKY (????? bucky isn’t even russian???) and the yoi thing I saw before had the japanese character being the leader of a russian mafia gang which is… like… guys it doesn’t happen it really doesn’t, and a lot of them re-use wrongly terminology taken from the godfather without context or knowing what the hell it means, and it’s always from the criminals’ pov and they’re somehow seen as criminals doing justice where the police can’t (???) and like… no. mafia bosses/enforcers/employees are bad people period, and at least here if you try to leave or repent they kill your family in retribution. like, not even ten years ago there’s been a woman who used to belong to a mafia family (or one colluded with the mafia) who testified and her entire town/family shunned her and she couldn’t take it anymore and… killed herself drinking acid if I don’t recall wrong. it’s not even special cases. this shit is not funny, it’s not cute, it’s not adorable and it’s not good fodder for your imagine your otp scenario (srsly I saw one like.. let me find it,

LIKE. just look at this shit. in a regular context, the enforcer goes to the show owner to force them to pay a monthly sum to their boss lest they destroy their shop and their lives and their family’s life never mind that mafia culture is deeply homophobic so the mafia enforcer flirting with the shopkeeper is like completely fucking out of the question. I mean, people here like to shit on the sopranos but that show was actually excellent representation of Horrid Criminals Who Were Never Supposed To Be Good People and the small arc that happened when one of tony’s friends turned out to be gay (closeted) was REALLY well done. btw, it ended that when they found out he was gay most of the crowd rejected him and thought badly of him until I think they killed him also for other reasons, but that spiraled from finding out he liked dick. and that’s american mafia that they actually based on well-done research of the culture in Italy it came from, I assure you that here it doesn’t work that differently. like. the shit above is so inaccurate and frankly offensive, it’s like… I get people romanticizing problematic stuff but the thing is that when you tell them that it’s actually offensive you get brushed off as ‘ah well you’re being too sensitive it’s just a word u__u’. now, I’m all for exploring shit we wouldn’t be into, but not like THAT, because that’s like mafia romantic comedy and that’s not how it works. now, you wanna do a fic where the mafia characters are deeply flawed and bad people and the police tries to catch them? fine, great, go ahead. you wanna do a fic where the enforcer above deals with dunno an entire life of internalized homophobia when he finds the shopkeeper attractive and feels conflicted over having to con money out of him and doing horrible shit for a living and maybe understanding that crime isn’t worth it and then he actually collaborates with the police and gets shit from about everyone he knows and loves for that? okay, awesome, go ahead. nothing bad in that.

but the shit above is not exploring things we wouldn’t/writing darkfic, it’s THINKING THAT A CRIMINAL ORGANIZATION WHICH IS STILL A THING IN OUR PART OF THE WORLD IS CUTE AND ADORABLE. and that only plays in their favor because it takes the bad aura out of the word and we really should not let that happen. like. that is what is bad about mafia aus and mafia discourse, that people don’t realize the mafia is alive and well and thriving and not a thing that doesn’t exist or a generic word for organized crime.

you wanna write the shit above? okay, CALL IT CRIME AU or mob au, not mafia au.

btw, add-on: idk if I mentioned it in the above post or not, but in case I didn’t, I said that people would balk at the idea of a mexican cartel au. sadly since then I’ve found out a fandom where not only there is one but it’s also extra cutesy and people apparently love it and it has a bunch of kudos/comments and idek I’m not even touching that with a ten foot pole but like… I’ve avoided it and everything that author wrote because to me it’s just… nope. like, nope. if you do mafia aus don’t make them fucking cute. (also: in the same fandom I had to mute a v. famous fanartist whose art I actually liked but did cutesy mafia aus and.. like… haahahhaahahahahaha nah sorry. can’t go there. nope.)

finetalpies  asked:

So now my mom is saying we should all vote Green because voting strategically to remove the Liberals is "bad" and also that John Horgan acted like a jerk during the debate and she believes all the crap aboot the NDP ruining the economy. It's frustrating because I know she used to be an NDP voter but suddenly she's gulping down the anti-NDP propaganda. Can you help me out with resources again? I'm specifically looking for the posts talking aboot how the economy actually fared during NDP/Lib govs

Fact Check: Did the NDP really spark a ‘decade of decline’ as Liberals claim? (the answer is mostly no)

This article on the BC NDP in the 1990′s also busts a lot of myths about the economy:

BC’s Economy: Whose Was Best?

Fact: The BC NDP’s economy in the 1990′s was better than Gordon Campbell’s BC Liberals were in the 2000′s.

Another account comparing the BC NDP & BC Liberals in power:

ARE THE BC LIBERALS BETTER FISCAL MANAGERS THAN THE NDP?

Pro-tip: The BC NDP come up on top again.

The BC NDP left the BC Liberals with a 1.5 Billion dollar surplus, the BC Liberals lied about it:

Campbell Misled Public on NDP Finances

On the BC Liberal side here’s some resources:

20 times Christy Clark got caught making stuff up about the economy

3 staggering charts show how big the gap between rich and poor is growing in British Columbia

B.C. has Canada’s highest inequality of wealth: report (2014)

B.C. has second-highest poverty rate in Canada: Think tank

Vancouver homeless count reveals 10-year high (2016)

Running on ‘Debt Free BC’ Slogan, Clark’s Liberals Added $10.85 Billion to Debt in Four Years

I think that’s probably good for now. But if you want more resources, let me know.

The Harsh Reality of Student Loans

Reading about the changes in student loan debt, rising interest rates, and horror stories from graduates dealing with paying back these ridiculous loans has my stomach so messed up.

Then we have the oldies and rich folks who lived in an easier time (economy wise) or whose parents had enough money to support their college education saying it’s our fault and we’re just entitled.

Bruh, I’m not a liberal in the least. I might have been years ago but growing up has made me realize the harsh reality of life. I know I chose to take out these loans and go to school. I also know it was the stupidest choice of my entire life, and I still have (hopefully) at least 60 more years of living to do.

I signed that contract and my life vanished at that point. Except I didn’t know it. My parents had no clue how loans worked. I was 18 and obviously stupid as hell. I wasn’t taught in high school about interest rates or paying debt or budgeting or anything. I was only told “you have to go to college to be successful and have a good paying career”. Boy, were these people lying.

I had no idea my college debt would result in me developing severe anxiety before I even graduated. I had no idea the reality of it before I signed that contract.

Also, those contracts make absolutely no sense. They’re written for attorneys and not the general public. I had no idea what I was reading. All I knew was I had to go to college to have a good life. Most people would say they’d do anything to be successful or be happy, am I right? Well, that’s what I did. I signed a contract with a blood sucking parasite also known as a bank. Two of them to be precise.

And guess what? When I realized my mistake, TWO YEARS LATER, you better believed I left the college that I loved and was getting so much experience at to go back home and attend a local school. I have paid out of pocket for the entire last two years of my schooling, totaling over $12,000. All the while only working part time because school takes up my whole life.

But I’m still left with $55k in debt from my first TWO years in college. Because I was uninformed, I was pressured, and I felt I had no other choice at the moment. I admit I made a terrible decision. And that is SO sad.

I believe in education so much. I love learning. I have loved school since I was 6 years old. I was so excited to go to college. And I HATE that it has now become my biggest regret and the biggest cause of my stress. I HATE that I will try my hardest to pave the way for my children to be successful without going to college, or working to save money during their first 18 years of life so they don’t have to feel this pain like I do.

Student loans are the biggest joke ever. All you high school students out there, pay out of pocket if you can. Forget the fun experiences if you want to go. Get your education. Or skip college, go to a trade school, or work on moving up in a basic job that will pay decent. You’ll probably make more money getting $10 an hour working 40 hours than you will getting paid your $18-25 working 50+ hours while you struggle to pay your student debt.

DO YOUR RESEARCH. DONT SIGN THE DANG CONTRACT. FIGURE OUT WHAT YOU ACTUALLY WANT FIRST. UNDERSTAND THE RAMIFICATIONS OF YOUR DECISION.

sure you’ll get to enjoy college, but that debt will likely stick with you for decades after graduation. That is NOT a burden you want.

The Gallifrey High AU That No One Needed But Here It Is Anyway

SO JUST A DISCLAIMER I WAS HANGING OUT WITH @coordinatorromana AND THEY WERE WEARING A GALLIFREY ACADEMY SHIRT UNDER THEIR GALLIFREY ACADEMY JACKET AND THIS AU LITERALLY STARTED WITH ME SAYING THAT THEY LOOKED LIKE A VARSITY ATHLETE FOR GALLIFREY HIGH SO IT’S THEIR FAULT NOT MINE

The year is 2XXX. Korean society has evolved so far that our ID schematics have been condensed into chips taking the shape of normal contact lenses. These ID lenses are given to children and are changed according to their growth needs. When their eyes stop changing a permanent lens is fixed onto one of their eyes, thus making ID cards and numbers obsolete. However, a growing number of reports are surfacing of chips becoming scrambled or dislodged after injuries, accidents, and other incidents. What happened to Leela Sae’s eyes to make her unidentifiable? In this new technological age spurred by chaebol conglomerates, whose family will come out on top? Will Korea’s economy be torn asunder in the rumbling threat of an economic war?

I imagined 갈리프레이 고등학교, 갈고 for short (Gallifrey High School, “Galgo” or “Sharpening” for short) as a Special High School, a fancy private high school for students whose parents are affiliated with conglomerates, diplomats, politicians, all kinds of important people. So basically like an international school minus the white people and with only three years in high school: Korean high schools split the twelve grades 6-3-3 as opposed to 5-3-4 as is common in America. (Yes this does mean that I headcanon the entire cast as Korean in this AU). Usually in these private schools, students from lower income families with certain professions (lower level civil servants/bureaucrats, small business owners, etc.) have access to certain degrees of financial aid that depend on how well the student does in school. In some rare cases, a very low income and potentially first generation student can gain a full scholarship for exceptional talent.

This is how we first meet Leela (새리라, Leela Sae), a seventeen-year-old cast out into the world who uses a fake last name for Reasons. She’s always wanted to be free as a bird and bird in Korean is 새 so she chose it as a new last name. She gains admission to Gallifrey High by winning a taekwondo tournament hosted by the conglomerate owned by Romana’s family, the 나라 (Na-Ra, “Nation”) corporation. The tournament was meant to scout new muscle to work as guard staff for Na-Ra with the promise of job security and a scholarship to 갈고 for the youth division. Because Romana is the heir apparent of the corporation, she is of course present at the tournament and as the newly-elected student body president she welcomes Leela to the school. Leela transfers to Gallifrey High as a second year, the same year as Romana.

Romana (나루마, Ruma Na) is the sole child of the ruling Na family, making her heir apparent to the corporation from the age of fifteen. She excels in school, consistently ranking first in her class, but finds her true passions lie in leading the school to victory and prosperity in all aspects of student life. However, recent tensions between conglomerates and within her own family’s corporation have kicked off power struggles in the Korean market as well as in school. A separate faction led by Darkel, the heiress to Kim and Co., a competing conglomerate and the Na corporation’s closest rival and bitterest enemy.

Darkel (김다루, Daru Kim), another second year and the Student Body Vice President, has consistently scored just below Romana in rankings, but despite her sharp intellect her unpopularity and refusal to listen to her peers made her lose the opportunity to hold power over the entire school, an opportunity she thought should be rightfully hers. As such, she gathered all the students whose families worked with or for her and rallied them against Romana and the Na-Ra corporation. This started a kind of turf war in the high school as well as starting an economic meltdown of global proportions as Na-Ra and Kim and Co. slashed prices, salaries, everything to compete against each other, resulting in the near-total collapse of the Korean economy.

As the war rages on, Darkel seeks out Narvin, the Student Body Treasurer and lures him to her side of the fight, intending to bankrupt his family’s large pharmaceutical company later to monopolize more power over the school and the economy.

Narvin (빈나라, Nara Bin, play on words with “empty nation” and also yes matching to one of the conglomerates guess which) is the Treasurer and is very stingy with club budgets despite only being a second year, but that’s what he likes so much about that work: He could know and control the money flow of the entire school. Although he starts out working with Darkel, when he discovers Darkel’s plan, he crosses sides to join Romana, despite his reservations about her and the transfer student she always hung around. Now, he doesn’t care to admit it but he cares deeply about Romana and Leela in the aftermath of the Sul War. Narvin is a huge nerd who is on the math team and participates regularly in the physics Olympiad.

On the other hand, Brax (시보락, Borak Si) seeks to gain more power than his position as Secretary of the Student Body by aligning himself and his family’s company with Romana. As a third year, this year is his last chance to try for student body president and he is growing more desperate. Darkel considers him a prime threat as a key player in this war due to his parents’ microchip development and manufacturing company, Si Sees Ltd. This emphasis on technological advancement to tear the other side apart led to the coining of this economic war the Sul War, for “Kisul”, meaning “technology.”

Wynter (태위영, Wi-Young Tae) is an impressionable first year who looks up to Romana and considers her his 선배. His family is among the first to go bankrupt when the falling cost of iron makes his family’s ironworks company go under and he leaves the country to pay off his debt to loan sharks.

Andred (뢰안도, Ando Rae), a second year who took interest in Leela, the new transfer student, as he was also a recipient of financial aid as the son of a lower ranking bureaucrat. He found Leela’s blunt language and unconventional wisdom charming and they dated for a while until Leela saw that Andred was just like all the other spoiled asshole brats at this entitled school and left him. Soon afterward, Andred was expelled for beating another student into unconsciousness despite multiple suspensions and warnings from similar behavior.

Matthias (아마디, Madi A, first name means “words”), was a quiet second year student but his family seemed to be the only one really staying afloat as he kept to himself and was often ignored by the likes of Darkel and Romana. However, when he was noticed he was generally well liked and as the son of a high ranking politician he knew how the game worked even if he chose not to play. Until now. Sensing a weakness in both Romana and Darkel, Matthias seized an opportunity to make himself student body president with the support of weary and newly broke students and the promise of rebuilding Korea’s techno-economic infrastructure.

The Doctor (닥터, Doctor), is a truant. No one knows what year he’s in, only that he’s smart but he pops in and out as he pleases and the teachers can only sigh and shake their heads at him because heaven knows they’ve tried yelling, punishing, locking up, it didn’t seem to matter to him.

Valyes is taking his second year a second time because he failed out the year before. Despite knowing how the school works and how the political game is played he lacks the common sense and patience to use what he knows effectively. (Yes I realize I’m being way too nice but I’m trying to get something of a consistent tone here ;w; )

Other minor commanders and such are class reps in the student council.

I haven’t met Ace yet where I’m up to (haven’t started season 6 yet) but according to Alex’s description my version of Ace is a delinquent with constantly dyed hair who could use the nearest object to smash your head in but would rather shatter your kneecaps and let Leela finish you off.

anonymous asked:

I do want to say something about the mafia thing real quick. IDK how long ago it was, but it was something I saw. I think when people write mafia AUs, they're not even going off Italian Mafia. They're going off of what they perceive is how the American mafia worked during the time of, say, Al Capone. I don't know how the Italian Mafia works, but I can say that the American mafia isn't a big deal anymore. Most mafia AUs I've ever read are set in the US, during the prohibition era. Very US-centric

Not that the American mafia was glamorous either, but writers generally romanticize. Especially fanfiction writers. I’m not saying it’s cool to make light of things. It’s not. But honestly, I don’t even think most of these writers are even aware that the Italian mafia is a huge deal. I’m not even sure they know there’s an Italian mafia. Writers romanticize a hell of a lot of things. Mobs, war, homelessness, you name it. I guess I just honestly don’t think getting worked over the word.

Yeah you are perfectly on point about what exactly they romanticize when talking about mafia, thought actually that is also kind of a problem because when I see posts praising Al Capone for being ‘the right kind of criminal/a criminal that did things honorably’ I wonder if people have even watched Untouchables in their spare time because he definitely was not. But the thing is - in the US it might not be enough of a deal anymore and I honestly do get why people make the mafia = regular mobsters, since the mafia was the first foreign organized crime being exported to the US via italian immigrants (sorry if this sounds horrible in English but I just woke up and I still didn’t have coffee) so I understand that mafia became the umbrella term.

But the thing is that - as you said, these people don’t even know that there’s a mafia in Italy anymore or where the word comes from. I’m going to link to italiansreclaimingitaly’s tag about the mafia and its perception outside Italy because they posted about this extensively and it’s an excellent resource, but meanwhile I’m gonna do a very short bullet point list and about the topic:

  • Mafia might not be a big deal in the US, but it still is here. We have the beauty of four different mafias (Cosa Nostra - the Sicilian one, camorra which is the one in Campania but has tendrils spread everywhere, the 'ndrangheta which is in Calabria and the Sacra Corona Unita in Puglia) which are all active [especially camorra and 'ndrangheta] and whose actions have direct impact (negative) on our economy and on our society. Actually mafias are one of the main reasons we’re currently economically fucked up, and if I start talking about how mafia culture keeps some areas literally backwards I could talk about it for three months.
  • There are still people who are killed for standing up against them. These days the most prominent personality is Roberto Saviano who is a writer who dared to put together a book documenting minutely the way camorra works and he’s been living under protection for years by this point. Like, they want him dead because he wrote a book. And I’m sorta sure that he was talking about leaving Italy and going to the US after years of sticking with it here because he can’t take it anymore but I don’t know if it was a taken decision or if it’s still debating it.
  • It wasn’t even thirty years ago that we had the stragi di mafia - in english it’d be something like the mafia slaughters, basically around the beginning of the nineties there were a number of bombs planted by the mafia targeting people who were trying to oppose it including judges Falcone and Borsellino. And they’ve killed people for way longer than that. Here is a list of only Cosa Nostra victims including the ones from the eighties/nineties. And people are still dying because of it. The slaughters I’m referring to are just the ones in the nineties which are enough of a number.
  • They also perpetuate a culture where if you testify against your mafia-employed relatives you’ll be shunned forever. There are women who testified against their families and couldn’t see their children anymore never mind that they weren’t automatically considered a relative anymore the moment they sided against the mafia. Some people have committed suicide after becoming witnesses also because our police force/justice system can be terribly non-supportive in this kind of situation so they got left on their own. Never mind that back in the day - it was the beginning of the nineties? - I recall at least a particular story of - I think, correct me if I remember wrong but I can’t remember the names for the life of me - where this guy testified against the local mafia when he either used to work for them or was forced to pay them the pizzo and in retaliation his six-year old (or five? Anyway he had a son younger than ten for sure) got kidnapped, killed and thrown into acid to dispose of the body. That happened in what, 1993? 1994? It’s pretty much yesterday. And now the camorra is doing the same - there’s a list here of camorra victims among which accidental passerbys that got killed because they were in the way which I can tell just by glancing is not complete. And I’m not even going into the 'ndrangheta. 
  • That is to say, here mafia still kills people and cripples our country.

Now, I get that it’s a word, but the point was: let’s say that instead of the Italians the Japanese came to the US first and the umbrella word for organized crime was yakuza rather than mafia and let’s say yakuza was still what it was originally in Japan while in the US it stopped being a big deal and people write yakuza!AU instead of mafia AU. Let’s say someone Japanese gets angry at that and goes like 'listen the yakuza is a real deal it does this this this and that and it’s a plague in our country so can you please at least look it up before writing your fanfic’, which is what had happened way back then when this whole mafia and fanfic thing blew up. A bunch of people told us to get over it because it’s just a word and if it’s a problem in Italy it’s not in the US so why should they care? Now, if we had been Japanese (or Chinese or Russian or Mexican) would they have said the same thing? Considering the general tumblr attitude I’m pretty sure they would have received either an apology or 'this is an important deal let’s keep that in mind’ with signal boost reblogs and stuff. It’s the fact that we should get over people not knowing that it’s still a real problem for us and that they can’t take five seconds to google it that is the problem imo. Especially when instead of mafia au you can just say mobsters au or tag it as organized crime and everyone is a lot happier, mostly because as the tag above explains romanticising the mafia is a good thing for them because it means they can act outside Italy with less stigma because everyone thinks that the mafia is dead or not relevant anymore, if I’m explaining myself. (And it’s active outside Italy - like, there was a mafia kill in Germany in 2007 where six people died (sorry the link is in Italian but there isn’t an English wiki page, if you look the city up you’ll find something probably) and it was because of the 'ndrangheta.

I’d really like to not get worked over it because it meant it was a thing of the past y'know, but the problem is that it isn’t and I’d rather spread some awareness in hope some of these writers look it up (because it’s a good thing that people know what mafia is since as stated they have tendrils everywhere - if you read Saviano’s book the entire first chapter is about how camorra regularly deals with Chinese import/export in Italy for one) than shrug and figure that since they’ll think everything is good for fanfic then it’s not even worth my time. 

Ugh sorry for the rant I didn’t mean for it to get this long /o\ but thanks for giving me the chance to and pointing the fact out because it’s something I’ve suspected for a while so it’s good to have external perspective on it. I just hope that I explained myself decently /o\

independent.co.uk
UK now the worst-performing advanced economy in the world after post-Brexit vote slump
Canada became the last G7 nation to report figures on Wednesday, confirming the UK’s position at the bottom of the list.

The UK is now the worst-performing advanced economy in the world, with growth slumping to just 0.2 per cent in the first three months of the year.

It means Britain is bottom of the G7 group of advanced economies, while Canada has surged to the top, with an expansion of 0.9 per cent in the period.

After Canada became the last G7 nation to report figures on Wednesday, the UK’s position at the bottom of the list was confirmed.

Before the Brexit vote, just under a year ago, the UK economy was flying high, outgrowing Germany, Japan and the US.

Now Britain is languishing alongside Italy, whose economy also grew at 0.2 per cent in the first quarter of the year.

Behind Canada at the top is Germany with 0.6 per cent growth, followed by Japan with 0.5 per cent, France on 0.4 per cent and the US at 0.3 per cent.

The UK economy had initially held up better than expected in the months since last June’s Brexit vote, as consumer spending remained strong.

However, signs of a deterioration have been gathering as Theresa May readies herself to begin divorce talks with fellow EU leaders.

Inflation jumped unexpectedly to 2.7 per cent for the year in April, thanks to a dramatic slump in the pound which has made imports more expensive.

Price increases are now outpacing wages according to the latest Office for National Statistics data. As a result, shoppers may soon have to rein in the spending that has kept the economy afloat, experts say.

Earlier this month the Bank of England downgraded its growth forecast for 2017 to 1.9 per cent.

By contrast, Canada’s economy is on course to register a 3.7 per cent expansion, according to the country’s national statistics agency.

anonymous asked:

Forgive me if I missed it but where would you place yourself on the political-economic spectrum? E.g., libertarianism & socialism, fascism & communism?

“Unlike the anti-capitalists of the far Left, New Rightists do not oppose the market or free enterprise per se, only a dog-eat-dog capitalism unaccountable to anything other than the bottom line. As Benoist writes, “I would like to see a society with a market, but not a market society.” Against both the liberal creed of laissez-faire and the Left’s statism, New Rightists favor an organic economic system in which market activity is geared to the general welfare. For this reason, they advocate a “recontextualization” of the economy within “life, society, politics, and ethics” in order to make it a means rather than simply an ends. Long-term development, innovation, and risk-taking enterprises (frowned on by the short-term profit concerns of anonymous managerial boards and institutional investors) would, they claim, actually benefit from a market subordinated to supraeconomic considerations, as such historical opponents of liberal capitalism as Bismarck’s Germany, Henry Carey’s America, Franco’s Spain, or the present East Asian “tigers” demonstrate. Economic freedom and healthy enterprises, they add, cannot long be sustained in atomized, impersonal, and indifferent societies geared solely to economic interests, prone as they are to unrest, uncertainty, and the loss of commonly accepted beliefs.

In rejecting liberalism’s market dogma, whose principal concern is financial speculation, the New Right by no means advocates a Soviet-style command economy (whose impetus, incidentally, was not sociocultural but economic). Guillaume Faye thus argues that while middle- and long-term economic objectives are rightfully the prerogative of the state, since they impinge on the welfare of the entire commonwealth, the execution of national economic strategies ought nevertheless to be in the hands of entrepreneurs free of bureaucratic micro-management. Unlike the present European situation, in which the economy is subject to the predatory laissez-faire forces of the global market, as well as to highly-regulatory, exorbitant-taxing domestic bureaucracies, identitarians propose a “liberal” functioning market, unhampered by unnecessary state controls, supportive of free initiative, protected from foreign interests, but nonetheless subordinate to the national interest.

Similarly, New Rightists emphasize that the “good society” is not necessarily the wealthy one, for the ability to generate the means of existence is hardly the same as the generation of existential “meaning.” Markets may be ideal in facilitating certain kinds of exchanges, but in the higher realms they lack all relevance. A landscape painting sold in a supermarket, for example, may be “economically more efficient” — cheaper to make, easier to distribute, even aesthetically more appealing to the vulgar — than a canvas of John Constable or Claude Lorrain, but to what effect if one loves the real thing? It might likewise make perfect economic sense from a banker’s or manager’s perspective to downsize workforces, divert investments abroad, eliminate national tariffs, and open borders, but healthy communities, with stable tax bases, fairly paid workers, and secure living standards to support family life inevitable pay the price. Above all, the market’s quantitative priorities, emphasizing profits accrued from exchange, rather than the productive needs of the nation, are not even “economically” viable. As Friedrich List, Karl Bücher, Othmar Spann, and certain other Central European economists have shown, liberal economies focused on exchange value are driven by profit and private gratification, not wealth creation. “The power to create wealth [, though,] is more important than wealth itself…[for] prosperity is not a matter of riches or exchanges…but of the degree to which the productive forces are developed.” Markets might therefore generate immense profits for multinational corporations, but, from a societal or national perspective, this has little to do with infrastructural developments, industrial innovations, the training of skilled workforces, or even efficient distribution systems. For once the well-being of individual investors and international financiers, not the productive forces of the nation, are taken as the “bottom line,” the market’s principal concern is no longer the economy, only the self-interest of those seeking to maximize their returns within it.”

— Michael O’Meara, New Culture, New Right: Anti-Liberalism in Postmodern Europe

The history books, which have almost completely ignored the contribution of the Negro in American history, have only served to intensify the Negroes’ sense of white supremacy. All too many Negroes and whites are unaware of the fact that the first American to shed blood in the revolution which freed this country from Britain oppression was a black seaman named Crispus Attucks. Negroes and whites are almost totally oblivious of the fat that it was a Negro physician, Dr, Daniel Hale Williams, who performed the first successful operation on the heart in America, and that another Negro physician, Dr. Charles Drew, was largely responsible for developing the method of separating blood plasma and storing it on a large scale, a process that saved thousands of lives in World War II and has made possible many of the important advances in postwar medicine. History books have virtually overlooked the many Negro scientists and inventors who have enriched American life. Although a few refer to George Washington Carver, whose research in agricultural products helped to revive the economy of the South when the throne of King Cotton began to totter, they ignore the contribution of Norbert Rillieux, whose invention of an evaporating pan revolutionized the process of sugar refining. How many people know that the multimillion-dollar United Shoe Machinery Company developed from the shoe-lasting machine invented in the last century by a Negro from Dutch Guiana, Jan Matzeliger; or that Granville T. Woods, an expert in electric motors, whose many patents speeded the growth and improvement of the railroads at the beginning of this century, was a Negro?

Even the Negroes’ contribution to the music of America is sometimes overlooked in astonishing ways. Two years ago my oldest son and daughter entered an integrated school in Atlanta. A few months later my wife and I were invited to attend a program entitled “music that has made America great.” As the evening unfolded, we listened to the folk songs and melodies of the various immigrant groups. We were certain that the program would end with the most original of all American music, the Negro spiritual. But we were mistaken. Instead, all the students, including our children, ended the program by singing “Dixie.”

As we rose to leave the hall, my wife and I looked at each other with a combination of indignation and amazement. All the students, black and white, all the parents present that night, and all the faculty members had been victimized by just another expression of America’s penchant for ignoring the Negro, making him invisible and making his contributions insignificant. I wept within that night. I wept for my children and all black children who have been denied a knowledge of their heritage; I wept for all white children, who, through daily miseducation, are taught that the Negro is an irrelevant entity in American society; I wept for all the white parents and teachers who are forced to overlook the fact that the wealth of cultural and technological progress in America is a result of the commonwealth of inpouring contributions.

The tendency to ignore the Negro’s contribution to American life and strip him of his personhood is as old as the earliest history books and as contemporary as the morning’s newspaper. To offset this cultural homicide, the Negro must rise up with an affirmation of his own Olympian manhood. Any movement for the Negro’s freedom that overlooks this necessity is only waiting to be buried.

— 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Taken from his last book “Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?” (1967) (pages 41-43)

“If you think Islam breeds terror, you are definitely someone who has no fucking clue what they’re talking about.

The Ku Klux Klan was born out of a war-torn and (objectively) oppressed population in the South. The Nazi party flourished in a nation whose economy was intentionally ruined to the point where citizens had to wheel around millions of dollars to buy a loaf of bread. Both of these groups were expressively Christian.

Were all southerners members of the KKK? No, but a lot were. Were all Germans members of the Nazi Party? No, but a lot were.

Yes, ISIS and Boko Haram are large organizations. But the appeal of them lies with the disenfranchisement and subjection to an environment where street violence is a daily thing. Young men are pushed into service to these groups because they genuinely see no other choice, and these groups give them a chance to feel like they have some purpose in this world other than to die and be forgotten about. The only reason why Islam is even in the question is because scripture can be so easily manipulated to provide any sort of viewpoint an educated ‘scholar’ wishes to push.

And honestly, seeing the way some of you talk about Islam, if someone offered you a gun and a plan to destroy ‘the enemy’ you’d probably join up too. Especially if they quote a bible verse that seems to provoke violence.

The Middle East was a bastion of learning and civilization when Europeans were busy lording over their serfs and killing their brothers to assume the throne. It wasn’t until the Mongols burned Baghdad to the ground in the 1200’s that the balance of power shifted Westward.

If you think groups like Boko Haram and ISIS just popped up out of nowhere because Muslims decided Western civilization needs to be destroyed, you actually have no idea what the West has done to Africa and the Middle East over the past 200 years.”

—  I didn’t write this but it should be posted
Venezuela’s paradox: People are hungry, but farmers can’t feed them

By Mariana Zuñiga and Nick Miroff, Washington Post, May 22, 2017

YUMA, Venezuela–With cash running low and debts piling up, Venezuela’s socialist government has cut back sharply on food imports. And for farmers in most countries, that would present an opportunity.

But this is Venezuela, whose economy operates on its own special plane of dysfunction. At a time of empty supermarkets and spreading hunger, the country’s farms are producing less and less, not more, making the caloric deficit even worse.

Drive around the countryside outside the capital, Caracas, and there’s everything a farmer needs: fertile land, water, sunshine and gasoline at 4 cents a gallon, cheapest in the world. Yet somehow families here are just as scrawny-looking as the city-dwelling Venezuelans waiting in bread lines or picking through garbage for scraps.

Having attempted for years to defy conventional economics, the country now faces a painful reckoning with basic arithmetic.

“Last year I had 200,000 hens,” said Saulo Escobar, who runs a poultry and hog farm here in the state of Aragua, an hour outside Caracas. “Now I have 70,000.”

Several of his cavernous henhouses sit empty because, Escobar said, he can’t afford to buy more feed. Government price controls have made his business unprofitable, and armed gangs have been squeezing him for extortion payments and stealing his eggs.

Venezuela’s latest public health indicators confirm that the country is facing a dietary calamity. With medicines scarce and malnutrition cases soaring, more than 11,000 babies died last year, sending the infant mortality rate up 30 percent, according to Venezuela’s Health Ministry. The head of the ministry was fired by President Nicolás Maduro two days after she released those statistics.

Child hunger in parts of Venezuela is a “humanitarian crisis,” according to a new report by the Catholic relief organization Caritas, which found 11.4 percent of children under the age of five suffering from moderate to severe malnutrition, and 48 percent “at risk” of going hungry.

The protesters who have been marching in the streets against Maduro for the past seven weeks scream, “We’re hungry!” as riot police blast them with water cannons and tear gas.

In a recent survey of 6,500 Venezuelan families by the country’s leading universities, three-quarters of adults said they lost weight in 2016–an average of 19 pounds. This collective emaciation is referred to dryly here as “the Maduro diet,” but it’s a level of hunger almost unheard-of outside war zones or areas ravaged by hurricane, drought or plague.

Venezuela’s disaster is man-made, economists point out–the result of farm nationalizations, currency distortions and a government takeover of food distribution. While millions of Venezuelans can’t get enough to eat, officials have refused to allow international aid groups to deliver food, accustomed to viewing their oil-rich country as the benefactor of poorer nations, not a charity case.

“It’s not only the nationalization of land,” said Carlos Machado, an expert on Venezuelan agriculture. “The government has made the decision to be the producer, processor and distributor, so the entire chain of food production suffers from an inefficient agricultural bureaucracy.”

With Venezuela’s industrial output crashing, farmers are forced to import feed, fertilizer and spare parts, but they can’t do so without hard currency. And the government has been hoarding the dollars it earns from oil exports to pay back high-interest loans from Wall Street and other foreign creditors.

Escobar said he needs 400 tons of high-protein imported animal feed every three months to keep his operation running, but he’s able to get only 100 tons. So, like many others, he’s turned to the black market. But he can only afford a cheaper, less nutritious feed, meaning that his hens are smaller than they used to be–and so are their eggs.

“My quality went down, so my production went down, too,” he said.

Escobar’s hogs also are skinnier. An average full-size pig weighed 242 pounds two years ago, he said. “Now they weigh 176.” Last year, he lost 2,000 hogs in three months when the animals got sick and he couldn’t find vaccines.

The piglets born since then are undersized. Many have bloody wounds at the tips of their ears. “When an animal has a poor diet, it looks for nourishment elsewhere,” explained Maria Arias, a veterinarian at the farm. “So they end up chewing off the ears of other pigs.”

Venezuela has long relied on imports of certain foodstuffs, such as wheat, that can’t be grown on a large scale in the country’s tropical climate. But trade statistics show that the land reform policies of the late Hugo Chávez, Maduro’s predecessor, made Venezuela more dependent on imported food than ever.

When oil prices were high, that wasn’t a big problem. Now Venezuela’s blend of heavy crude is worth barely $40 a barrel and the country’s petroleum output is at a 23-year low, in part because refineries and pipelines are breaking down and investment in new infrastructure isn’t keeping pace.

The government hasn’t published farming data in years. But Machado, the agriculture expert, said annual food imports averaged about $75 per person until 2004, then soared after Chávez accelerated the nationalization of farms, eventually seizing more than 10 million acres. The government expropriated factories, too, and Venezuela’s domestic food production plummeted.

By 2012, annual per capita food imports had increased to $370, but since then, oil prices have slumped and imports have dropped 73 percent.

Instead of spurring growth in domestic agriculture, the government has strangled it, farmers say. Domestic production of rice, corn and coffee has declined by 60 percent or more in the past decade, according to Venezuela’s Confederation of Farmer Associations (Fedeagro), a trade group. Nearly all of the sugar mills nationalized by the government since 2005 are paralyzed or producing below capacity.

Only a small, well-off minority of Venezuelans can afford to buy much food on the black market, where a pound of rice imported from Brazil or Colombia sells for about 6,000 bolivars. That’s roughly $1 at the black-market exchange rate, but for an ordinary Venezuelan worker it’s an entire day’s wage, because the bolivar has lost 99 percent of its value in the past five years.

Venezuelans who don’t have access to hard currency depend on government-subsidized groceries doled out by pro-Maduro neighborhood groups, or wait in supermarket lines for rationed, price-capped items. Those who join anti-government protests have been threatened with losing their food supplies.

The price controls have become a powerful disincentive in rural Venezuela. “There are no profits, so we produce at a loss,” said one dairy farmer in the state of Guarico, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he feared retaliation from authorities. To get a new tractor, he said, he would have to spend all the money he earns in a year. “It’s a miracle that the industry is still alive,” he said.

Four of his cows were stolen this month, probably by hungry families in the nearby village, he said.

According to Vicente Carrillo, the former president of Venezuela’s cattle ranchers’ association, the overall size of the country’s herd has dropped in the past five years from 13 million head to about 8 million.

Carrillo sold his ranch more than a decade ago, tired of threats from squatters and rural activists who accused him of being an exploitative rural capitalist. His family had owned the land for more than a century. “I dedicated more than 30 years of my life to this business, but I had to leave everything behind,” he said.

Escobar, the chicken and hog farmer, said the only way for farmers to remain in business today is to break the law and sell at market prices, hoping authorities look the other way.

“If I sold at regulated prices, I wouldn’t even be able to afford a single kilogram of chicken feed,” he said.

If it’s not a fear of the government that keeps Escobar awake at night, it’s criminal gangs. Since one of his delivery trucks was robbed in December, he has been forced to make “protection” payments to a mafia boss operating out of the local prison. Every Friday, three motorcycles stop by the farm to pick up an envelope of cash, he said. Calling the police would only escalate the danger.

“I know how to deal with chickens and pigs,” Escobar said, “but not criminals.”

Market report: High Street gets boost as City urged to ‘buy British’

Analysts at Barclays helped to enliven a quiet day for markets with a dose of patriotism as they urged clients to “buy British”.

Shares in companies whose performance is closely linked to the UK economy have been “underloved and undervalued” since Brexit and as the High Street decline continues, Barclays said.

“Valuations continue to price in a recessionary drop in consumer spending growth,” the investment bank said.

However, it added that a collapse in the UK economy “appears unlikely” and reckons some of the UK’s biggest names are now worth a punt, even after a slight recovery recently.

Lloyds Banking Group, Marks & Spencer, and WH Smith were all added to its European recommended portfolio today. Barclays’ backing helped the bank to rise 0.4p to 72.18p, M&S to improve 4.05p to 388.95 and WH Smith to gain 16p to 1790p.

However, optimism eluded pub operator JD Wetherspoon — another bell-wether of British spending.

Not only did it miss out on being on Barclays’ list, but it was dragged down 7p to 1007p as Citi analysts contradicted their rivals and downgraded Wetherspoons from Buy to Neutral “amid growing concern for the outlook of UK consumers” and after a strong share price run.

The FTSE 100 nipped back above 7500, climbing 31.41 points to 7502.12 thanks to mining and oil shares, which rose as commodity prices strengthened. Royal Dutch Shell rose 9.39p to 2174.39p and mining heavyweight Rio Tinto was up 39.5p to 3207p.

Credit Suisse’s downgrade to underperform knocked Micro Focus, which is soon to buy HP Enterprise’s software business for £6.8 billion, down 79p, or 3.2%, to 2393p as analysts expressed concerns about “structural pressures” at the software giant. They said cash conversion is just 75% of profits, lower than many industry rivals.

Premier Oil was 1.25p up at 63p after drilling started at a well off the coast of Mexico in which it has a 25% stake.

Metals Exploration, the Philippines gold miner controlled by property moguls Nick and Christian Candy, tumbled 0.88p, or 26%, to 2.5p on AIM after annual losses swelled to £18 million.

Contrary to popular belief, terrorists do not attack western countries only. They also attack Arab countries, because terrorists do not care if you’re a muslim or not, if you speack English, French, Arabic, German, Spanish, Japanese or whatever, they are fanatics that have no religion and that should not be considered human beings. 

Today in Tunisia, 4 terrorists attacked innocent people at the Bardo museum in Tunis, our capital. A little note here that Bardo museum is the equivalent of The Louvre, but in Tunisia. Smaller, and not as rich in content sure, but just as important to us Tunisians. 

100 people were hold hostages, 19 were killed and 24 others were injured. 19 people were killed; 17 non-Tunisian tourists and 2 natives. So far, I haven’t heard anyone but very few foreign channels talk about this incident. Sure, Tunisia isn’t a huge country, but I thought terrorism was an international enemy, and that we were supposed to talk about it publicly each time it strikes to show just how cruel these animal were.

Everyone talked about the events of Charlie Hebo in France, and the hostages in that coffee shop in Sydney, so why are they ignoring this incident? A bomb went off inside a museum, 19 people died and 24 are still being treated in emergency rooms, so how is this less important of an attack?

But do you know what is the worst part of this? Tunisia is a country whose economy depends largely on tourism. And what happens when 7 tourists get killed and dozens more get held hostages for hours straight? Tourists do not come anymore and that’s really a shame because just yersterday, I’ve been to a place in Tunisia that I didn’t even know existed before and it is of such natural beauty that I could do nothing but stare in amazement for hours.

Terrorism has no nationality and no religion, so let’s please stop trying to give it one.

mage-marquisearchive  asked:

What do you think of Dolly Madison? I know the age difference in her marriage was beyond creepy, but she seems like a pretty cool gal other then that. (she's also smirking in all of her portraits? what's up with that?!)

OKAY LITERALLY I AM GOING TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION BUT I HAVE TO MAKE A QUICK ASIDE AND SAY THAT I MISREAD “DOLLY MADISON” AND THOUGHT YOU SAID “DARTH MAUL” WHICH MADE THE REST OF THE MESSAGE REALLY INCREDIBLY CONFUSING.

I’M GLAD DOLLEY/DOLLIE/DOLLY MADISON SAVED THAT PORTRAIT OF GEORGE WASHINGTON WHEN D.C. WAS BURNED IN THE WAR OF 1812 AND SHE HERSELF SEEMS LIKE A PLEASANT ENOUGH LADY WHO HELPED SHAPE AND DEFINE THE OFFICIAL ROLES OF THE FIRST LADY IN THE OVAL OFFICE, BUT I’M ALSO FORCED TO REMEMBER THAT SHE WAS A SLAVEOWNER AS WELL, ONLY SELLING HER SLAVES TO SETTLE THE DEBTS SHE WAS LEFT WITH AFTER HER HUSBAND’S DEATH. 

MUCH OF MY OPINION OF HER IS INTERTWINED WITH HER HUSBAND JAMES MADISON, HONESTLY. THE AGE DIFFERENCE (17 YEARS) WAS SOMEWHAT CREEPY, BUT ON JAMES’ PART, NOT DOLLY’S, AND GIVEN HOW MUCH TIME JIMBO SPENT STANDING NEXT TO LITERAL CHILD MOLESTER THOMAS JEFFERSON, IT ALMOST SEEMS LIKE SMALL POTATOES. 

ONE OF THE REASONS I HAVE TROUBLE WITH DOLLY IS THAT SHE WAS INCREDIBLY LIKABLE AND CHARISMATIC, WHICH DID A LOT TO BOOST THE NUMBERS OF JAMES MADISON AND WHAT IS NOW REFERRED TO AS THE DEMOCRATIC-REPUBLICAN PARTY, WHOSE POLICIES TENDED TO PUT AN EMPHASIS ON THE SOUTHERN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY (YOU KNOW THE ONE, WHERE SLAVES DID ALL THE WORK AND THEIR LAZY CAPTORS MADE ALL THE MONEY?) AND EXPANSION INTO THE WEST (THIS DIDN’T BODE WELL FOR THE NATIVE AMERICANS!)

I CAN’T EXACTLY BLAME HER FOR ALL THAT, THOUGH, THAT’S MORE JIM AND TOM’S FAULT, BUT THE FACT REMAINS THAT HER REPUTATION AS AN ALTRUIST IS SOMEWHAT MARRED BY THE FACT THAT SHE AND HER HUSBAND OWNED LITERALLY HUNDREDS OF SLAVES AT MONTPELIER, AND THE ONLY SLAVES THEY FREED WERE THE ONES WHO BOUGHT THEIR FREEDOM, AND THE REST WERE SOLD OFF ALONG WITH THE PLANTATION TO COVER THEIR DEBTS

ALSO AS FOR THE SMIRKING I THINK THAT’S JUST WHAT SHE LOOKED LIKE

Proudhon & Private Property

There is widespread confusion as to what leftists precisely mean when they argue against ‘private property’.  Because property is broadly defined as everything one owns, we have seen ridiculous notions of leftists trying to redistribute toothbrushes, shoes, towels etc.  But the left goes on a specific definition of property, and while Proudhon and Marx had differing views on private property (connected to their differing social projects), Proudhon’s criticism of property has remained relevant through to the present day.

Proudhon looks to the legal rights embodied in property, and property rights as both a right to use or be in and a right to claim sole ownership of a thing.  He argues that while the first is a useful right, the second goes against the other inalienable rights his country (France) was founded upon.

Proudhon criticizes first the idea of property as an inalienable right; as opposed to other inalienable rights property ‘exists for the majority of people simply as a potential’, one cannot buy or sell one’s liberty or equality before the law, and in effect ‘property’ as a right merely defends the deeply unequal status quo of property relations.

Proudhon (as well as Marx) also distinguished between personal property (clothing, toothbrushes, towels) and private ownership of the means of production (land, factories, etc).  The first is a fact of life, the second leads to problems, and the combination between the two (housing or education as both a necessity and a market for profit) leads to horrid contradictions.  The control of the means of production leads to yet another contradiction: that is, while products are created communally by laborers, the profit those products gain is expropriated individually.  This leads to an increasingly skewed economy, whose inequality is justified by the ‘right to property’.

Mod R

AFROXE-NO-PHOBIA Illustration by Negritude Republic

In response to the recent Afrophobia attacks. We hope to rid our society of this scourge.

Stand up against xenophobia and don’t just post, tweet or speak out about how you feel and do something to fight xenophobia.

Movements like Negritude, African Humanism, Black Consciousness would attest, the ‘self’ always becomes more than just a reaction to the ‘other’. It takes up positive forms. So negritude is just not about a negro, but about a new attitude. The collectivized memories of victimhood do not just become archives of common suffering, but repositories of emancipation. This positive formulation of these inherently negative identity codes means they are much more than just the ‘other’ to the ‘other’.

Who is a South African?

The end of Apartheid created the need for a new identity in South Africa. The Post-Apartheid regime thus was always clamoring to bring South Africa back to Africa. Under this pursuit, Africanness became the defining feature of the new identity discourse in South Africa. Simultaneous to this, xenophobia against foreigner Africans emerged potently as a counter-discourse to Africanness.

Ever since the end of Apartheid, xenophobia has been a recurrent reality in South African politics. The worst manifestations of this were the 11 May 2008 attacks in which 62 people were killed. Xenophobia in South Africa has a peculiar, even hypocritical, profile. (Solomon and Haigh, 2009). It is the ‘foreigner’ with a particular colour – more black than the South African black – that is routinely characterized as the ‘despicable other’. Xenophobia in South Africa has emerged potently in form of ‘Afro-phobia’ (Sevenzo, 2010).

Admittedly, Xenophobia would not be a right term for characterizing the structured and manifest violence targeted against foreigners in South Africa, since White foreigners are usually not at the receiving end of this hatred. On the contrary, they are considered as being good for the economy and culture of the country (Nyamnjoh, 2006:28). At the receiving end of the discourse and practice of xenophobic violence is a specific foreigner (with a particular shade of Black): African. Paradoxically, it is the same country whose mining sector, the backbone of its economy during and post-apartheid, is largely sustained by the foreign Africans (Sharp, 2008).

The xenophobic discourse, that partakes from the notion of modern statehood, harps on indigenity/nativity/autochthony as being the basis of citizenship and a qualifier for one’s identity of being a South African (Neocosmos, 2006). To Vale, it is unconvincing that the native question in South Africa has still not been resolved (Vale, 2002).

References
Interrogating Africanness and Afro-phobia Vineet Thakur, Jul 18 2011

Appiah, Kwame A (2008). ‘African Identities’, in Geschiere, Peter et al. (eds) Readings in Modernity in Africa (Pretoria: UNISA Press), pp. 88-91.

I have to point out that I am an American negro. And I live in a society whose social system is based upon the castration of the black man, whose political system is based upon castration of the black man, and whose economy is based upon the castration of the black man.

A society which, in 1964, has more subtle, distinctive, deceitful methods to make the rest of the world think that it’s cleaning up it’s house, while at the same time, the same things are happening to us in 1964 that happened in 1954, 1924. They came up with a civil rights bill in 1964, supposedly to solve our problem, and after the bill was signed, three civil rights workers were murdered in cold blood. And the FBI head, Hoover, admits that they know who did it, they’ve known ever since it happened, and they’ve done nothing about it. Civil rights bill down the drain.

No matter how many bills pass, black people in that country, where I’m from, still our lives are not worth two cents. And the government has shown its inability, or either its unwillingness to do whatever is necessary to protect black property where the black citizen is concerned. So my contention is that whenever a people come to the conclusion that the government, which they have supported, proves itself unwilling, or proves itself unable to protect our lives and protect our property, because we have the wrong color skin, we are not human beings unless we ourselves band together and do whatever, however, whenever, is necessary to see that our lives and our property is protected, and I doubt that any person in here would refuse to do the same thing if he were in the same position, or I should say were he in the same condition.

Just one step farther to see if I am justified in this stance, and I am speaking as a black man from America which is a racist society. No matter how much you hear it talk about democracy, it’s as racist as South Africa or as racist as Portugal or as racist as any other racialist society on this earth. The only difference between it and South Africa, South Africa preaches separation and practices separation, America preaches integration and practices segregation. This is the only difference, they don’t practice what they preach, whereas South Africa practices and preaches the same thing. I have more respect for a man who lets me know where he stands, even if he’s wrong, than the one comes up like an angel and is nothing but a devil.

— 

Malcolm X, Oxford Union Debate, Dec 1964

Half a century on and not a damn thing has changed.

Studio in the Rue de Furstenberg (1865). Frédéric Bazille (French, 1841-1870). Oil on canvas. Musée Fabre, Montpellier, France.

Bazille shared the studio with Monet. Although Bazille is absent, his box of paints, palette, and brushes are visible. He depicts his daily world with great economy. The work pays subtle tribute to Monet whose Honfleur landscapes painted in 1864 adorn the walls.