anonymous asked:

Are you even native American

Hello nosey nonnie.

Yes I am Native American, but I don’t look it. And no it’s not one of those my great grandmother was Cherokee. I am 2nd generation off the rez Tuscarora, Iroquois Turtle Clan.

This is me and my mother. Yes she is my birth mother, I just got very fucked over in the genes department. I swear I’m adopted but we have many photos of the birth and have several paternity and maternity tests to prove that I fell out of this woman’s vagina.

Here are some more pictures cause I’m pale and I honestly don’t think you believe me:

(My mom actually made every piece of jewelry I am wearing and hand beaded that vest as well).

And here’s pictures of the woman that I blame for my bad genes: My grandmother.

I get told I look like her all the time AND I HONESTLY DO NOT SEE IT, but because I get told I look like her all the time I BLAME HER.

On the left you see my grandpa (full blood native) in his headdress, on the right you see my cousin (also full blood), the great medicine man Mad Bear, here’s a book about him since you seem to be so nosey.

And in case you doubted me, here are a few pictures of me when my ma and I were on the powwow circuit.

This is me with my ma’s regalia (if you call it a costume I will shank you) because a) she had a bad leg day and couldn’t dance and b) mine was not ready and made and I JUST REALLY WANTED TO DANCE. (This is also the day I got burnt ON MY FUCKING HAIRLINE WHERE MY HAIR WAS PARTED. THAT FUCKING HURTS!)

Here’s me in my fancy dance shawl. There aren’t that many pictures of me because a) I fucking hated them b) it’s normally seen as disrespectful to take pictures of dancers out of the circle without their permission and my ma and I were always dancing at the same times AND I NEVER LET ANYONE TAKE MY PICTURE AT THIS TIME IN MY LIFE.

So yes, my family is a very rainbow family, I just happen to be the one WHITE passing one. No really…

Here’s me (in the middle if you can’t guess), Bebe and Audree. I like to call this the ABC Rainbow of the Printup family (because my first name is Cheyenne…..I swear our parents DID NOT PLAN THIS). 

And this is another pic of me and Audree YEARS later

Am I Native? Yes

Do I look traditionally Native? No

Does that mean I am not going to label myself as native? HELL TO THE FUCK NO.

Please reblog and share so that people can understand that there are white passing people of color. Yes even some that pass as white as me. We do exist and no that does not give you the right to basically white wash us. I am proud of my native roots and I will share everything and anything you want to know. The more educational resources we can get out there the better. DON’T BE AFRAID TO SHOOT ME AN ASK. I LOVE IT, but please do not be a dick like this one and phrase it so accusingly. Much appreciated, thank you!

hollywoodreporter.com
'Ghost in the Shell': 4 Japanese Actresses Dissect the Movie and Its Whitewashing Twist
THR invited the women to join a no-holds-barred conversation about cultural authenticity and why Japanese nationals fail to understand the race controversy: "People in Japan worship white people."

How did the movie compare with your expectations?

Traci Kato-Kiriyama: It was stunning visually, but emotionally it didn’t draw me in.

Keiko Agena: It was harder to watch than I thought it was gonna be. To get emotionally invested, you have to really care that she needs to find out who she is. But when she finally meets her mom, my gut felt so weird in that moment.

Kato-Kiriyama: That scene was devastating on all levels. It got me because of the emotion of the mother [veteran Japanese actress Kaori Momoi]. She’s really wonderful. That scene should have been beautiful, but Major had nothing in her eyes. Acting-wise, what a missed moment.

Atsuko Okatsuka: I wasn’t aware they were gonna explain the whitewashing. I thought it was just going to be an action film, no explanation, just go with the fact that it’s a future Japan with this robot cop. And then to be like, “Oh shit, I used to be a Japanese woman!” (Laughter) That was against my expectations.

How did you feel when that twist was revealed?

Agena: That was hard, y’all. Hard and awkward.

Ai Yoshihara: Major’s backstory is white people trying to justify the casting.

Okatsuka: And they f—ed up in the process because now it looks even worse. The text at the beginning of the movie explained that Hanka Robotics is making a being that’s the best of human and the best of robotics. For some reason, the best stuff they make happens to be white. Michael Pitt used to be Hideo.

Agena: That was the other cringe-worthy moment, when they called each other by their Japanese names. We’re looking at these beautiful white bodies saying these Japanese names, and it hurt my heart a little bit.

Kato-Kiriyama: It was supposed to be so touching and intimate, and it felt gross. And kind of laugh-worthy at the same time.

Okatsuka: I would have preferred them just using American names. “You used to be Bob.”

6

So yeah, white-washing is bad, but more often than not unintentional. 

As mentioned above, there have been a few blogs recently that make the claim of being against white washing, yet continuously misdiagnose and lack any fundamental understanding of basic color theory or anatomy. So, the intent of this post is to help give people a vocabulary through which they can address the issue of white washing, while presenting solutions in a way  that other artists can understand and learn from.

White washing is inexcusable, but “too pale” won’t fix it.

The thing about Death Note is that it could have been good, if they had actually Americanized it instead of white washing it. I’ll explain the difference. 

Death Note is amazing, not just because of it’s interesting premise, art, and storytelling, but also because it asks audiences to ponder over various moral conundrums. Sure the larger questions of whether we can sacrifice the few for the greater good, and whether people/States have the right to take away the lives of other are fairly universal, but other shows, books, and mangas have asked the same questions. What makes Death Note so good is that it is deeply grounded in a specific place and political context. It is a commentary on early 2000s Japan. It is specific, yet understandable across many contexts. It asks old questions in new ways, and therefore gives us the opportunity for new answers. 

Imagine if Death Note had actually been Americanized. Imagine a young Native American girl found the Death Note. She’s 15 and pregnant, because Native American women are one of the most vulnerable groups to sexual assault in the United States. She knows who her rapist is. His name. His face. Because it is so rarely a stranger. She also knows the names and the faces of the congress member and representatives who are trying to push an anti-abortion bill that would even rule out an exception for rape. She knows the names and faces of every cop that laughed her out of the police station, and the doctors that asked her what she was wearing before refusing to do a rape kit. Imagine if this girl found the Death Note. 

Imagine if Death Note had actually been Americanized. Imagine a young Black boy found the Death Note. He’s been stopped and frisked for the second time that day, and his best friend was shot 16 times two years before because apparently, a wallet looks just like a gun. He knows the shooter’s name and face, the cop didn’t even get fired and that’s why he was able to frisk our protagonist today. He knows the names and faces of teachers who would rather send their students to juvie rather than detention, or even talk to them. He knows the names and faces of the preachers talk about uplifting the spirit while only caring about uplifting their bank accounts. Imagine if this boy found the Death Note. 

Imagine if Death Note had actually been Americanized. Imagine a young Filipina girl found the Death Note. She’s the only one in her family with papers. ICE raids are becoming more common, but the masks and the shields keep them nearly anonymous. Faceless men take her mother, then her brother, and finally her father. She doesn’t know their names and faces, but she’s had glimpses of ICE vehicle numbers and a knack for hacking. She knows the president, though, stoking anti-immigrant sentiments. Imagine if this girl found the Death Note.

Imagine if Death Note had actually been Americanized. Imagine a young white boy found the Death Note. And his name is Dylan Roof, Adam Lanza, James Holmes, Elliot Rodger, Jared Loughner, or Charles Manson. A Shinigami meets 4chan, MRAs, and the “alt-right”; death god meets god-complex meets white male supremacy. We don’t need to imagine what happens if these boys find the Death Note. We already know, but it would still make damn good television.

If instead, all we get is Light Turner, depoliticised and decontextualized, just another white face on another Japanese story, what is the point?

Not that BTS has necessarily been bad about this before, but I think probably the best thing about the Spring Day MV is that they didn’t use color correcting, makeup, or lighting to white wash their skin

JUST

LOOK

AT

THAT

NATURAL

SKIN

TONE

GOD

FUCKING

B L E S S

PLEASE DO NOT SUPPORT THE NETFLIX DEATH NOTE


this “american” adaptation of Death Note is just wrong in so many ways.
firstly, it’s “american” which apparently equals white, even tho japanese/asian americans exist. the argument that no asians who spoke “good” english auditioned to play any of the characters is stupid in every way. Edward Zo who was born and raised in california, auditioned but was turned down because “they were not looking to see asian actors for the role of Light Yagami.
with this netflix “reimagining” they’re taking everything death note is known for and making it white™
by bleaching the heck out of death note, it’s no longer death note and just falls into the action movie cliché. death note’s whole story revolves around Japan’s justice system that’s not really based on race. in america race is a big thing and we know that most of the prisons are filled with black people and that white people get away with crimes a lot of the time.
so light tuner is just a white guy killing people and getting away with it, and if they follow through the story of death note then a white guy is gonna end up killing a black guy….. YIKES

asians are one of the least represented groups in america, when was the last time you saw a asian lead actor, in a successful movie? when was the last time you saw an asian in a movie when they didn’t play a stereotype? Light Yagami is a handsome, straight A student, light tuner™ looks like a crazy person, someone you’d expect to be Kira.

please just don’t support the release on netflix, if you wanna watch it, please stream it somewhere else. (シ_ _)シ

as for old and new death note fans, watch the original anime, Japanese movies, the drama with kento yamazaki and masataka kubota ♡, the musical, and read the manga! please don’t not support the netflix version.

and let’s use the hashtag “#dead note” instead of “#death note”, let’s keep that movie out of the death note tag.

please spread this 〜 ψ(。。)

As an Asian American living in America, discovering Kpop made me realize that I don’t have to be white to make it big. I should feel proud of my culture and language, and not feel ashamed about it. It showed me that I’m beautiful with my tan skin, dark hair, and brown eyes. It showed me that no matter what race you are, you can achieve something big! Now learning about Exp, I’m so mad, I’m almost livid, because it’s easy for whites to enter the Kpop industry but Asian Americans struggle with entering the American pop industry Kpop allows Asians to be proud of their race, their language, and their culture.

Yes Exp has different races (the two black members disappeared before debut, and that’s so ironic because Kpop takes from Black Culture as well), they’re not Asian except for one. But the point in Kpop was to represent Asian culture, first Korean culture, now also bringing Chinese, Thai, and Japanese culture (and hopefully more Asian cultures soon). This is important because Kpop gets so much crap because the artists are Asian. In America, Asians are seen as jokes. Kpop needs to be respected for it’s Asian artists.

Now Exp marches into the Kpop industry while other rookies have or are working their asses off to debut and these guys come in here because they’re funded…and this begins white washing everything that Kpop stood for! (This happened before with other music genres)

KEEP OFF WHAT ASIANS HAVE WORKED SO HARD TO ACHIEVE IN THE WORLD, WHICH WAS SHOW THAT YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE WHITE TO MAKE IT BIG, TO MAKE INTERNATIONAL FAME, FOR SOMETHING WONDERFUL AND GREAT. OUR HISTORY, RACE, AND CULTURE, ISN’T A JOKE And if Exp continues promoting and this starts a chain of similar events Kpop will lose what made it important, and that’s not okay with me.

5

Source: https://twitter.com/dialacina

She’s the only person I’ve seen talking about the cultural appropriation/whitewashing in Horizon Zero Dawn. I already had bad vibes about this game but this confirmed all of my hunches about it being trash. 

As much as you guys want to spite pissbaby white boys who are crying over a female protagonist, consider this side of the coin as well.

Honestly like I HATE how underrated Peter Pan (2003) is because:

The mermaids were Asian

Tiger Lily was ACTUALLY Native American and even spoke the native  language 

These cuties turn into

THESE HOTTIES!!

And don’t even get me started on the music score

Honestly this new Pan aint got nothing on the old one, sorry ‘bout it