white people classes

😒

Hell all teachers should do this in the mornings!! You see her class is predominantly black. All ideas start somewhere..and I’m pretty sure she never once told anyone it was her idea…come on. 

We gotta stop reaching with certain shit, unless this lady get on TV or something and start claiming it was her idea or taking praise for it this should not be a problem! The whole point is to engage and be interactive with the kids. 

btw Barry White Jr actually said in his video that he hopes more teachers start doing it.

Things People Need To Remember

• White people are not the problem, racists are.
• Muslims are not the problem, terrorists are.
• CIS people are not the problem, transphobic people are.
• Christians are not the problem, homophobic and judgmental people are.
• Rich people are not the problem, wealthy people who used the poor to become rich and make fun of the lower class are.
• Those who share, celebrate and honor a culture are not the problem, those who wrongly appropriate a culture to lower it or make fun of it are.
• Men are not the problem, misogyny and those who think are they’re the better sex are.
• Women are not the problem, misandry and those who think are they’re the better sex are.
• People are not the problem, their bad actions are.

‘Gay’ means gay white men with large discretionary incomes, period. Perceiving gay people in this way allows one to ignore that some of us are women and people of color and working class and poor and disabled and old. Thinking narrowly of gay people as white, middle class, and male, which is just what the establishment media want people to think, undermines consciousness of how identities and issues overlap. It is essential, however, in making connections between homophobia and other oppressions, not to fall prey to the distorted reasoning that the justification for taking homophobia seriously is that it affects some groups who are 'verifiably’ oppressed, for example, people of color, women, or disabled people. Homophobia is in and of itself a verifiable oppression and in a heterosexist system, all non-heterosexuals are viewed as 'deviants’ and are oppressed.
—  Barbara Smith, Homophobia: Why Bring It Up?

Just my opinion but maybe the mlm’s are right that redneck revolts outreach to conservatives makes them vulnerable to infiltration by fascists and it’s something they have to constantly remain vigilant against and maybe the anarchists are also right that impoverished working class white people aren’t completely devoid of any revolutionary potential and they happen to be the majority of the population in communities where redneck revolt has branches so there’s some utility in reaching out to them and giving them the opportunity to attain some class consciousness

  • Them: Why don’t you ever stand for the National Anthem/Pledge?
  • What I say: Oh, my knees are bothering me, ya know?
  • What I mean: I don’t believe in compulsory patriotism. A country must earn the respect of the people, not force it upon them by making us precede every gathering and ceremony with what amounts to lyrical brainwashing. And I, currently, am not particularly proud of our country or the people who lead it, so I’m not going to stand. Is that alright with you Stan???
How to Stump a Racist Prof Who is Claiming White Privilege Exists

1. Ask them to define “white.”
A. If they say it is skin tone, ask them to draw the line.
B. If they say it is a class that people assimilate to, point out that that means black people can assimilate. If they say black people cannot, point out that it is really about skin tone then.

2. Ask them to accompany you to the registrars to make a formal accusation that the registrar afforded you racial preference. The prof will back down. They know that they have no evidence to support such an allegation.

3. Ask them in what precise way the white homeless child of a meth user has it easier than a black homeless child of a meth user. Demand something specific.

4. If they try to use slavery…
A. Cite the fact that a VERY low percentage of US residents could afford to own slaves.
B. Press them to explain why they have excluded the ripple effects of white slavery from their equation.

5. Demand they deliver some kind of tangible evidence that every “white” person is given a leg up. When they try, there will be ample instances of impoverished whites who did not benefit from their example, and you can point out that class privilege is a better model to explain what they think they see.

ibtimes.com
Fat-Shaming And Body-Shaming, A History: Author Talks Thigh Gaps, 'Dad Bods' And Why We Hate Fat
Amy Farrell, author of "Fat Shaming," explains why we mock overweight people.

This article is really good and informative. It talks about the history of fat hate and diet culture, as well as it’s origins in among middle-class white people. It explains how Fat was the evil antagonist, the sign of an uncivilized and “primitive” body and linked with “scientific” racism that [attempted] to prove that African people and indigenous people were inferior. I’m not surprised fat hate started with white people. They seem to be the root of all evil. 

-Mod Mariah 

If something doesn’t apply to you, then you have no right to speak on behalf of a whole group that is affected by it. When women, the LGBTQ+ community, the mentally/physically disabled, Muslims, immigrants, POCs, etc. say that they are offended or that they are hurt or being disrespected or being oppressed or that they are fearing for their lives, fucking LISTEN TO THEM. Believe me, they know a hell of a lot more about their oppressions than you do.

So stop telling minorities that there’s nothing to fear or that if we just do everything the “right” way we’ll be fine. Not everything is so black and white and to act like it is is just showing that you are coming from a position of privilege that, unfortunately, not everybody has.

Stop telling minorities how to feel about what is going on around them and what is happening to them. They shouldn’t have to feel these horrible things- nobody should- but they are. The least you can do is realize that their feelings are valid and try to help them.

Stop telling minorities, “Oh, well, I’m an [insert minority group here] and [blah blah blah] doesn’t hurt/offend/scare me.” Because yeah, it’s great that you are in a position of privilege/power where you aren’t being affected by these things, but use that position to help others and just acknowledge the fact that not everybody has the same luxuries that you do.

Just because you can’t see or understand the magnitude of what is going on, it doesn’t mean that it isn’t happening. It just means that it isn’t happening to you. (at least not to the same extent as other people are)

Instead of telling minorities how to feel, listen to us. Open up your eyes. Don’t stay ignorant. Try to understand the viewpoint of different minorities and realize that although you will never truly be able to, you will have at least a tiny bit more of an understanding- you will gain some sort of compassion by doing so. Then find a way (or ways) to join in the fight for justice and equality.

flickr

Saraç (Loriner)

Since white people never understand simple statements unless people of color repeat them ten times, let me say this again: racism is taught. Racism is not a belief pre-determined by biology, neuroanatomy, genetics, or anything else. Racism is how white supremacy manifests. White supremacy is the reason that white people are taught to be racist since childhood, and white supremacy is the reason everyone, including people of color, grow up embedded in a racist environment. White entitlement is maintained by the mechanisms of white supremacy. It propagates through imperialism, modern slavery, police brutality and other forms of state violence, incarceration, and even education. There is no excuse or explanation for racism other than white supremacy - no, working-class white people aren’t racist because of capitalism wreaking havoc on their lives; white women aren’t racist because of patriarchy; white LGBT people aren’t racist because of heternormativity; white disabled and neurodivergent people aren’t racist because of ableism. 

That white supremacist groups are able to appeal to all these classes of white people who are marginalized on some axis is proof of white supremacy - even though these specific groups of white people may face some type of marginalization and even violence, they still align with their race because it affords them a facade of power. And look, this has been the case for hundreds of years. Poor Irish immigrants in the south (USA), who were quite literally seen as the dregs of Southern society, were not only still regarded better than black people, but they themselves celebrated that at least they weren’t grouped with black people. Unions and labor organizations routinely discriminated against black people, against East Asian immigrants, and against Jewish people - in fact, many of them were created to combat the onset of immigrant labor. Plenty of white feminist and white LGBT activists contribute their time to racist and imperialist causes and organizations to “empower” themselves. Similarly, if you’re going to tell me that I should excuse racist white neurodivergent people because “they don’t have the same handle on objective reality and are susceptible to being racist because of that”, not only are you inadvertently exposing your own ableism, but you’re also telling me that neurodivergent people of color don’t matter and that people of color should be “fine” with violence if it’s coming from a white neurodivergent person. 

White neurodivergent people are not racist because of their home circumstances or neurochemical imbalances or developmental dysfunctions or symptoms of mental illness. They are racist because even they are socialized to be racist. White supremacy affords power to even the most marginalized white people because even the most marginalized white people will still gain the benefits of white socialization and will still be regarded as superior to all people of color. Moreover, neurodivergent people of color who may also struggle with cognitive functions and perceptions of objective reality aren’t enacting racist violence. So to say that racism is symptomatic of mental illness is meaningless. 

Notice how white middle class people are SILENT about the grenfell tower but when it comes to the Manchester attacks they were steady hashtagging… just goes to show the class gap really does exist in our society

I have never really understood exactly what a ‘liberal’ is, since I have heard ‘liberals’ express every conceivable opinion on every conceivable subject. As far as I can tell, you have the extreme right, who are fascist racist capitalist dogs like Ronald Reagan, who come right out and let you know where they’re coming from. And on the opposite end, you have the left, who are supposed to be committed to justice, equality, and human rights. And somewhere between those two points is the liberal.

As far as I’m concerned, ‘liberal’ is the most meaningless word in the dictionary. History has shown me that as long as some white middle-class people can live high on the hog, take vacations to Europe, send their children to private schools, and reap the benefits of their white skin privilege, then they are ‘liberal’. But when times get hard and money gets tight, they pull off that liberal mask and you think you’re talking to Adolf Hitler. They feel sorry for the so-called underprivileged just as long as they can maintain their own privileges.

—  Assata Shakur

anonymous asked:

Hello! So I was scouring the Internet for advice today but I couldn't find any on this topic. My problem isn't that I don't have any ideas (I probably have too many) but the problem is that I don't LOVE any of my ideas. I like them. I think they're all fine ideas. But liking them isn't going to motivate me long enough to finish a novel. How can I give my ideas that extra uumph to make me love them? How can I figure out what's missing or why I don't feel this way about any of my ideas?

Hello, nonny!  What a challenging question…  This one’s been in my inbox a couple days, just because it’s such a big question.  But I’ve thought it over and I think I have some ideas for you :)


The Thrill Is Gone – How to Find It Again

So generally, there’s no one answer or cure-all to this problem.  I’ve had this issue multiple times, with different causes.  My first novel didn’t have enough meat to the plot; my second novel had been over-planned in my head to the point that it no longer excited me.  My third novel had way too much plot, so that by the time I got ¾ the way through, I’d written over 200K words and felt sick of the idea.  I started my fourth novel way too soon, and am now going back and planning it more!  So there are obviously many different reasons that a story doesn’t take off (or dries up eventually).

The first step is to figure out what’s missing, like you said.  There are a few aspects of your story to assess…


1. Plot

I’m discussing plot first because, to me, it’s the most important part of fiction.  Plot, conflict, and stakes are foremost to my stories.  You could have the most complex and sympathetic characters, but without plot, they’re static and become boring.  But for some reason, this is the part of story ideas that new authors neglect most!

So if your story has great characters and an immersive setting, but you can’t get into it, try asking a few questions about your plot:

  • What is the point of the plot?  What’s the message you’re conveying in the story?  Even if your story isn’t an allegory or a metaphor or the next Chronicles of Narnia, there should always be a conclusion to which all plots arrive – otherwise, the story can feel aimless.  The best way to find your message is to look at the conflicts involved (e.g. Man vs. Man, Man vs. Nature, etc.) and find the “winner”.  What worldview, belief, or concept “defeats” the other concepts?  It can be as simple as Good vs. Evil, or more complex, like Loving the Sincere Drug Addict vs. Settling for the Selfish Dentist (provokes the question “Is love worth danger in relationships?”).
  • Does the plot have ups and downs?  And really consider both ends of the spectrum here.  Stories become dull if they are made up of victory after victory – or if they’re made up of nothing but loss and tragedy.  No matter the genre, you have to strike some sort of balance, lest the story become predictable and emotionally non-engaging.  Find victories and failures, even in unassuming places, to keep readers invested and hopeful.
  • Do you have a satisfactory ending?  Or do you have the ending     planned yet?  I’ve found that I can’t really commit to an idea unless I see a resolution – otherwise I feel too nervous to start.  If you do have an ending planned, make sure it’s the right ending.  It can feel like there’s one possible conclusion, and once you’ve found it, you stick to it – but question it, brainstorm it.  It may not be a happy ending every time, but when you find the right one, you’ll know it.
  • Do you have the right plot at all?  Look at your story as a whole.  Does it start too early or too late, relative to the real meat,     the real action?  Is it told from the most impactful POV?  Does the plot cover too much ground for one book, or is it not enough to fill the pages?  Consider all the characters, backstories, and subplots you have, and ask yourself if any of them are more interesting than the main plot.  If so, shift your focus.  Use them instead.

2. Characters

Maybe it’s not your plot that’s going sideways.  Maybe you have it all worked out – the head, the tail, the whole damn thing – but it still doesn’t feel right.  It doesn’t feel like it’s coming to life, somehow.  It feels flat.

That can be a character problem.  It would be like sitting by the campfire and hearing the most fascinating, horrifying story, except it’s told by a man with The Most Boring Voice Who Talks So Incredibly Slowly and Takes All the Fun Out of Everything.  An example: The Hunger Games.  Those books bored the crap out of me.  Unless someone was being killed or Haymitch and Effie were interacting, I just didn’t care.  And those books had a great plot behind them!

So here’s what you need for a good cast of characters:

  • A solid protagonist.  Solid = three-dimensional, empathetic, and relatable; having a goal, an internal conflict, a self-image, and fears or shame.  They should have different facets of themselves – their head and their heart, their desires and doubts, and that little voice in their head that says, “Give up on that.  Be realistic.”  Give them strengths, weaknesses, and a couple of bad habits, for kicks.
  • A variety of supporting characters.  You don’t have to have thirty characters + six secret characters stuffed under your trench coat; but with however many characters you have, make them as different from each other as possible.  Give them some similarities, of course, so that they can relate to each other – but never make them so close together that you have to decide, “Who should say this line?  Character A or Character B?”  Make them unique enough that the words come out of their mouths, instead of you having to decide where to put the words, yourself.
  • Relationships, relationships, relationships.  And I’m not talking about romantic relationships.  I mean, sure, those too – but there are many different kinds of relationships to explore.  Friendships, enemy-ships (?), parent relationships, sibling-ships, silent alliances, “annoying friend-of-a-friend”-ships, “my-ex’s-little-sister”-ships, “you’re-the-ruler-of-the-galaxy-and-a-Sith-lord-but-also-my-dad-please-stop-being-evil”-ships…  You get the idea.  Make them unique, make them strong, and allow them to evolve over the course of the story.
  • Diverse morals, interests, and personalities.  My first short stories focused on white middle-class people who were culturally and politically identical.  They lived in one house, usually, and watched the same TV shows and made the same references.  They had the same sense of humor.  They rarely disagreed on anything that wasn’t clear-cut (e.g. “You drank the last Pepsi!”  “I was thirsty!”).  So do yourself a favor and don’t make my mistakes.  Give your characters unique ethics, cultures, backgrounds, personalities, goals, appearances, and conflicts.  You’ll be more invested by then, I’m sure.

3. Setting

Lastly, I’d like to add that while your characters and plot could be well-developed, there’s always a chance that they’re placed in the wrong setting.  This is why many story ideas can seem great, but won’t get off the ground – maybe they’re set in a pre-made universe like Middle Earth or Panem when they could be their own story.  Maybe your tragic romance is set in the middle of apocalyptic war, when instead, it should be drained down to a period piece.  Maybe your story is perfect, except you’re writing it too close to home – in the real world, in the present year.  There are a million factors to picking the right setting, including:

  • Applicable history and culture.  If you’re writing a story about someone who’s oppressed, or someone who’s a politician, or someone who’s a witch, you’re going to need to back that up with history.  Develop a history for the oppression or politics or witchcraft – where these things began, how they developed over time – and a culture for them now – how oppressed people survive and how witches in your world interact, etc.
  • Imaginative scenery, influenced by the characters.  Even if your story takes place in New York City in 2017, allow your characters’ living spaces and workplaces to have a unique touch – colors and quirks that your readers can see in their mind.  If even you can’t see what you’re writing, inspiration is going to be difficult to find.
  • A lifelike background.  Just because the plot focuses on your characters does not mean everything going on behind it should be quiet and dead.  Anyone who looks out a window in a city building can see other people living – people on the highway will see other cars taking other people other places.  Everyone who has a friend will hear a little something about their friend’s siblings, their friend’s friends, their friend’s neighbors.  Life and stories exist outside of your plot; make sure you’re not writing about a ship in a bottle.
  • An aesthetic.  That sounds gross and teen-tumblr-y, but let me tell you personally: I don’t feel truly ready to write (and love) my story until I can hear the music for the future movie adaptation – until I can see the kind of clothes the people wear, the games they play, the places they eat and shop.  I think of the colors and themes in my scenes (e.g. my first novel was set primarily at night in a grunge/city setting; my current novel is very green and outdoorsy and gives me that feeling of bonfires just after sunset).  Once you get that “feeling” from your story, you’ll know it.

Anyway, this reply took me like three days to write because I really wanted to get into it.  I hope some of this helps you to fall in love with one of your ideas, so you can get started :)  If you have any more questions, be sure to send them in!

(I have 26 questions in the inbox, though, so be patient with me…)


If you need advice on writing, fanfiction, or NaNoWriMo, you should maybe ask me!

Fatness, Race, Class and Gender.

Content note: Swearing. And when I start swearing, you know shit’s bad.

So which one comes first?  Are you black or fat first?  Are you LGBT+ or fat first?  These are questions that need to piss off and die immediately.  I cannot seperate myself into palatable components for your digestion.  I could draw a Venn diagram of how they all overlap, but sadly the people who ask these sort of things don’t want to learn - they want you prove yourself.  Spoiler alert: you will never be worthy to them.

If you discuss fatphobia, but never mention how race affects how you are treated, then what the everlasting fuck are you doing?  Fat liberation is blindingly white, cisgender and heterosexual.  These are the voices who get heard, whose articles appear in popular media.  These are the people who can afford to attend Fat/Body positivity conferences and know they will receive a warm welcome.  They will never be the only one of their ethnicity in a group of fat folks.

If you discuss fatphobia, but never mention how fat LGBT+ people (with a few Bear-shaped exceptions) are subject to punishing drives of fat hate; how poverty affects fat LGBT+ people of colour differently than their white counterparts, then take the first exit out of here, you useless cumstain.

I am thoroughly sick of the white, able-bodied cisfemale gaze being the only thing I see in fat liberation.  I am tired of their voices as the only ones amplified. And I could happily live the rest of my life without reading another piece on fatphobia that only concentrates of American white women who are at the smaller end of the fatness scale.

I want to read about experiences of disabled fats, LGBT+ fats who are black or brown, fat folks who are elderly and/or poor.  Because we are the ones who face multiple oppressions, who can’t afford to shop the latest fat celebrity lines (I’m looking at you, Beth Ditto) to look incredible.  We are the ones who get written out of conversations time and again, even though we have been speaking out for decades.  

So all you gusset-tickling, wankers can just shut your mouths for one shit-stained minute.  The rest of us would like a chance to be heard.

Additional goodies for your consideration…

• Political action resources > https://alexaweinstein.tumblr.com/7_Ways

• Reliable sources of information > https://alexaweinstein.tumblr.com/Sources

• Recommended reads and documentaries > https://alexaweinstein.tumblr.com/Recommended

I suspect that ‘dumb white hillbilly coal miners voted for Trump and now they’re losing their healthcare’ makes for a more vindictively satisfying narrative than the real one: ‘middle-class white people voted for Trump, and nothing much is happening to them’.