white album

5

The Beatles recording at Trident Studios, St Anne’s Court, London on 1st October 1968, working on Honey Pie for the White Album. The backing track was recorded during this 16 hour session, with Paul on piano, John on electric rhythm guitar, George on bass and Ringo on drums (of course) played with brushes.

Pics: Linda McCartney.

white album explained (part 2)
  • birthday: paul's that guy who's like hey happy birthday and the other person is like ? it's not my birthday and paul is like oh haha i thought we had the same birthday weird :^)
  • yer blues: john wants drugs
  • mother nature's son: the most passively egotistical song a person could write (until let it be)
  • everybody's got something to hide: john takes paul's hello goodbye how to write a song advice but the end product wasn't as good
  • sexy sadie: even the instruments are dripping with sarcasm
  • helter skelter: PAULL IS!!!!! INTO SERIAL KILLERS!!!!!!!! (i bet your parent(s) said that at least once if they've heard this song)
  • long, long, long: is anything playing hang on *turns up volume* oh yeah it's just long, long, long
  • revolution 1: so weird bc it sounds like past john writing to future john complaining about like bagism, or like a song paul would write when he and john were doing that cute back and forth thing for a while
  • honey pie: when the beatles' time machine breaks down in the 1930's, they need to use the power of music to save the day. written + driected by paul mccartney, executive producer george martin
  • savoy truffle: proof that chocolate is both sexy and scary
  • cry baby cry: rich people doing casual rich people things like painting a painting and holding a seance
  • revolution 9: if......you become naked *crowd chants*
  • good night: really cute but kinda awkward if you're listening to the album at like 1pm

“The four songs written and sung by Christine McVie make it clearer than ever that she’s one of the best female vocalists in pop, and a deft song crafts-woman as well. “Say You Love Me,” “Over My Head,” “Sugar Daddy” and “Warm Ways” transform conventional pop-song structures into durably attractive and believably genuine pieces – each sounds like an ideal radio song. McVie’s singing – slightly husky, not beautiful but unaffected – is simply captivating; she does everything right.”

-Rolling Stone x

July 11, 1975: Fleetwood Mac releases their self-titled album with new members Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham.