which is so hard to color

funny story

when I was little, I would go on Nickelodeon.com all the time and they had this game similar to club penguin except it was called Nicktropolis. and if you forgot your password, a security question you could choose was “what is your eye color?” and if you got it right it’d tell you your password. so I would go to popular locations in Nicktropolis and write down random usernames who were also in those areas, and then i would log out and type in the username as if it were my own and see which of these usernames had a security question set to “what is your eye color?” (which was most of them, since it was easy and we were all kids). i would then try either brown, blue, or green, and always get in, then I would go to their house and send all of their furniture and decorations to my own account’s. and if it I didn’t want it, i could sell it for money

I just saw this on Reddit today and I wanted to share it here.

When you’re a parent, you have to realize that the child you brought into this world is going to be their own person and you’ll have to start getting into things you may not understand and have ZERO interest in.

However, you damn well better act like you are.

I can still remember the feeling as a kid getting Pokemon Red and it being something I loved so much, so I wanted to share that with my mom. I wanted to show her my team, tell her about the gym leaders I took down, and she just took a glance at the Game Boy color and went “mmhhhmm”.

She gave zero shits when I beat Banjo-Kazooie, a game which was INCREDIBLY hard for grade school me and you can make me have war flashbacks if you so much as say “Rusty Bucket Bay”.

My town in Animal Crossing? Catching rare fish? Who cares?

I liked a cartoon series so much that I wrote little stories about it? “No, I don’t want to read it.”

This type of stuff matters to kids so damn much and she’ll never realize how much it hurt our relationship. It might not seem like a big deal she never sat down and watched me play something like Luigi’s Mansion, but that’s how kids try and bond with their parents.

After constantly being shot down they’ll eventually stop talking to you entirely. 

ok so, it turns out that i love drawing altean lance,, a lot

here’s my submission for @splat2zine 💕💖 thank you for having me! ^o^

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Hey guys, Jo’s back!! after a month (ish) semi-hiatus, here’s a little overture to hopefully an entire symphony of posts. This is my bullet journal spread from last week, but as you can see, it’s only for thursday and friday. That week, I had to plan out my day by the hour because I had a lot of things to do, mainly study for my AS levels. The timeslots are mostly blank because I took the photos before I planned for the two days (I think it was Tuesday).

Some materials I used are the Tombow brush pen in the color 772, a coral-pink (?) Zebra mildliner, a 0.5 sarasa pen, uni-pin 0.1 drawing pen, and a 0.7 Muji gel pen.

Oh, and also featured is a simple collage thing I made inspired by Paramore’s (aka my favorite band in the entire universe) new single Hard Times (which I definitely recommend you listen to even if you’ve never listened to them before), along with fake polaroids of the trio.

And yeah, hope I can update more often and post more content. Coming tomorrow is a May monthly planner and calendar printable, so look out for it!

The 2 Elements of an ORIGINAL STORY IDEA

If you’ve been doing this writing thing for more than one day, you’ve likely experienced the following worry: 

“What if my story idea ISN’T ORIGINAL?”

And if my experience is any indication, things spiraled downwards from there: “What if it’s cliche? What if there’s nothing new here?! It IS cliche. It ISN’T original. I’m a failure! ALL MY WRITING NEEDS TO BURN!”

Calm yourself. There’s a way to make sure that your story concept is unique.  

First, what IS a story concept? It’s the initial idea that made you want to write the thing. It’s the “What If” question that starts everything off. Later, it will be the promise that hooks the reader or audience, and makes them want to experience the story. 

So for example: What if Cinderella was a cyborg? What if a rat wanted to be a french chef? What if a fish had to venture across the ocean to find his son who’s captive in a dentist’s office aquarium?   

All great concepts. All of which seem to be comprised of two elements: something that we already know about, a set up that establishes expectations, and then something contrasting and surprising, which creates irony or surprise.  
So the first element of a successful story concept is FAMILIARITY. 

Establishing expectations? Something we already know about? Familiarity?! That sounds like the definition of UNorginal. 

Hear me out. 

What do readers do when foraging for a new novel at the bookstore? Certain readers gravitate to certain shelves. Some go to mysteries, some to crime, a whole lot to romance, and the rest to the other genres that are too numerous to list.

 Why is this? Because genres give them a pretty good idea about what they’re going to get. Readers already know the conventions of the genre. They’ve already put in the work of learning, accepting, and enjoying these conventions. 

Genres give both reader and writer something to go on right away. For the reader, genres are expectations for story events, setting, character, and more, which are automatically enjoyable to them. For a writer, it’s a set of expectations which can be flipped to create something remarkable and unique.  

It’s like telling a joke. Without a setup, there can’t be a punchline. 

The genres are the setup, the individual twist the author puts on that genre is the punchline. Or in other words, readers truly do want the same thing –only different.  

To illustrate this, let’s take a look at one of the most successful stories of all time.

With space ships, interplanetary travel, sentient robots, and aliens running amok, Star Wars LOOKS to be the kind of story that requires the audience to expend lots of mental energy to comprehend and believe. At first glance, it seems that imaginations are going to have to stretch a great deal, and there won’t be anything familiar to ground us – this SEEMS like an uncomfortably new, unwelcoming world. But I doubt if anyone has ever felt uncomfortable or unwelcome while watching Star Wars. And the reason for this can be summed up with one ellipsis-ended sentence:

Suddenly, all is clear. This isn’t the hard-to-imagine future, this is the PAST. We’re not being asked to imagine and believe a totally new world; we’re being taken to the realm of “far, far away”, a place we’ve known since childhood. Isn’t “a long time ago” just another way of saying “once upon a time”? Yes, it is, so we know where we are now. We are in a fairy tale, a myth.  

The familiarity of fairy tales sets us at ease and sets our expectations in place. Expectations which Star Wars meets with flying colors: A farmboy who must become a knight. A princess imploring for aide. A mystical wise-old-man mentor. Sword fights between good and evil. A magic that operates like religion. A dark lord and a dark side. Star Wars was built upon something we already know, something timeless, something we’ve always enjoyed. 

And once those well-known expectations were set, Star Wars was free to add the unexpected and create one of those most memorable story worlds ever.
Think of a story you love, and you’ll probably be able to identify the something-already-known aspect of it.  

How about Harry Potter? 

When we hear “boarding school”, mental images and probabilities are instantly conjured in our minds. We picture classrooms, dormitories, a campus with very old buildings, kids in uniforms, a giant place for meals, living through a schoolyear with a bunch of kids your age, etc. Even if we don’t know much about boarding school, we all know what regular school is like (even us homeschoolers over here *waves*) and our expectations for that are nearly identical from person to person.  

So what does this prove?

It proves that one half of your story’s concept must be grounded in something we already know, and know well. These are the expectations you are going to establish for your reader, before the second element of your concept upends everything and creates something wholly unique. 

You need FAMILIARITY. You need to ground your concept in something WELL-KNOWN. Only then will you be able to create something ORIGINAL. 

Where can familiarity be found?  

1. Genre Conventions 

2. Occupations 

3. Well-known stories  

The possibilities are not limited to these categories, of course. Familiar subjects can be found within many other areas. However, Familiar elements seem to share certain qualities … 

Provides a rough timeline

⦁ Conjures imagery

⦁ Sets expectations for events, characters, opposition, etc

⦁ Has natural potential for conflict 

⦁ Serves as a goal-oriented backdrop for the plot

To see how this works, let’s look at Harry Potter again: 

Familiarity: Going to boarding school. (An occupation)

Timeline: A school year (which Voldy always lets Harry complete before trying to kill him again, bless him.)

Story Expectations: When we hear “school”, we know what we’re going to get.

Imagery: Boarding school conjures tons of possibilities. 

Conflict Potential: It’s a thousand kids living in one castle with a handful of adults – there’s going to be conflict. 

Goal-Oriented: School is inherently goal directed. You want to graduate. And in the case of boarding school, you want to win the house cup. 

But of course, this familiar environment is only HALF of the concept for Harry Potter. The other half, of course, is WITCHCRAFT AND WIZARDRY. Which brings us to the 2nd element of a successful story concept, which will be the subject of the next post.

Crystal Safety, Revisited

There’s an awesome post going around by @prettycitywitch that discusses crystal care and toxicity. I noticed a few errors in it, just due to the source that was used, so I contacted her and got permission to rewrite it to ensure the most accurate information possible is spread around in the witchy community. I’ve gone through every crystal in her list and added a few others. 

Everything in this list has been confirmed by the Gemological Institute of America Laboratory (one of the foremost in gemological research), multiple published mineralogical sources, and/or at least two online mineralogical databases. Crystals of particular concern in each category have been bolded; the other listed crystals have a bit of wiggle room.

Crystals affected by sunlight or heat
Most crystals (including nearly all in this list) are safe to expose to sunlight temporarily - you can wear them in jewelry during the day, for example, but don’t leave them in your windowsill for weeks. In general, colorless crystals may be left in the sun indefinitely, while colored (especially pink) crystals should be stored in a place that doesn’t get direct sun all day. Heat, on the other hand, can easily affect many crystals, but usually only at high temperatures (steam or a jeweler’s torch), so I’ve only included the ones that could be damaged by relatively low temperatures.

  • Amber - may crack in heat
  • Amethyst - may fade over time; safe to expose to sun temporarily
  • Apophyllite - heat can cause flaking; sunlight is fine as long as the specimen is kept cool
  • Maxixe (dark blue beryl) - fades extremely quickly to pale brown in sunlight; color can only be restored through irradiation
  • Azurite - will fade over time with exposure to sunlight; store in a dark, cool environment
  • Celestine - fades in long exposure to sunlight
  • Chrysoprase - may fade in sunlight; restoration of color sometimes possible through prolonged storage in water
  • Fluorite - occasionally can fade in sunlight
  • Hackmanite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Hiddenite - unstable in sunlight and heat to a lesser degree than kunzite; however, some darker green hiddenite is much more unstable than kunzite and great care should be taken, as it can fade in a matter of minutes
  • Kunzite - will fade drastically in sunlight; indoor incandescent light can also slowly affect this stone
  • Larimar - fades over time when exposed to sunlight and heat
  • Morganite - deeper colors or more lilac hues can fade in sunlight
  • Opal - fading is minimal, but sunlight, heat, and changes in air pressure can cause internal fracturing called “crazing”
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may lose color or turn dull in sunlight or heat
  • Sulfur - extremely heat-sensitive; crystals may fracture or burst if left in the sun or held in your hand
  • Topaz - irradiated stones may fade in direct sunlight
  • Tugtupite - exhibits tenebrescence, a temporary change in color due to sun exposure; will return to original color if kept in a dark area
  • Vanadinite - may darken and lose transparency in sunlight
  • Zircon - heat-treated stones may revert to original color over time in sunlight; avoid exposure to UV lights (tanning beds, nail salons, etc)

Water-soluble crystals
Though many crystals will eventually be worn away by water mostly due to tiny particles of other substances suspended in the water, there are very few that will dissolve in water in any significant way. Contrary to what some believe, most crystals with the suffix ‘-ite’ aren’t water-soluble; ‘-ite’ simply means ‘stone’ and is part of most mineralogical names. 

  • Anhydrite - not water-soluble, but instead will absorb water and convert to gypsum; store in a dry environment and do not submerge
  • Boji stone - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron component
  • Calcite - somewhat soluble in slightly acidic water; neutral or slightly alkaline water is usually safe; negligible dissolution in air due to gaseous carbon dioxide
  • Celestine - very slightly soluble
  • Chalcanthite - easily soluble in water, but must be stored in a humid environment
  • Chalcopyrite - not soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Fluorite - very slightly soluble
  • Gypsum - somewhat soluble; solubility decreases in warmer water
  • Halite - easily dissolves in water; moisture from your skin or humidity in the air can eat away at crystals
  • Hematite - not water-soluble, but exposed rough areas may rust
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble; solubility increases with presence of salt
  • Magnetite - not water-soluble, but may rust due to iron content
  • Malachite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Marcasite - water may trigger decomposition into melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid
  • Mica (muscovite, fuchsite, lepidolite, etc) - plate or sheet-like specimens may absorb water into cleavage planes and begin to break apart; aggregated crystals are safe in water
  • Pyrite - exposure to water, including high-humidity environments, can trigger breakdown
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in water containing carbon dioxide
  • Selenite - somewhat soluble; solubility decreases in warmer water
  • Sulfur - soluble in warm water; may form sulfuric acid over time if left in a wet or humid environment
  • Ulexite - dissolves in hot water; slightly soluble in cold water

Acid-soluble crystals
A large number of crystals will dissolve in acid. Many only dissolve in strong acids, such as hydrochloric acid - I won’t list those here because it generally won’t be a concern. There is very little information on mineral solubility in weak acids, such as vinegar, so this list is incomplete. But really, why are you soaking any of your crystals in acid?

  • Amber - “young amber” is soluble in a large number of chemicals
  • Aragonite - easily soluble, even in dilute acids; effervesces
  • Atacamite - readily soluble in acids
  • Azurite - may be slightly soluble
  • Calcite - easily soluble; effervesces
  • Lapis lazuli - composed of a number of minerals, including calcite, which may be acid-soluble; acetone and other substances may remove dye
  • Magnesite - slightly soluble in acids
  • Malachite - readily soluble in acids; color may also be affected
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - soluble in acids; surface will become dull and pitted
  • Rhodochrosite - slightly soluble in warm acids; effervesces
  • Smithsonite - effervesces and dissolves in acids
  • All water-soluble crystals

Crystals affected by salt
Salt is a dehydrator, so any hydrated crystal may be damaged by it. Salt has a hardness of 2 to 2.5 and may scratch any mineral softer than this. It is safe to put non-hydrated crystals of a hardness between 2.5 and 7 in salt, but very fine scratches may occur due to impurities; don’t put cabochons or faceted stones in this hardness range in salt.

  • Apophyllite - may dehydrate in salt, resulting in flaking; usually not an issue unless combined with heat
  • Cavansite - may dehydrate
  • Chalcanthite - dehydrates easily, forming potentially dangerous powder; store in a humid environment
  • Gypsum (including selenite) - hardness of 2; may be scratched by salt; may dehydrate to anhydrite
  • Opal - will dehydrate and develop internal fractures called “crazing”; store in a wet or humid environment
  • Pearl (& mother-of-pearl) - may become dull and pitted
  • Stilbite - may dehydrate

Potentially dangerous crystals

In general, crystals are pretty safe - handling them is usually okay. Many crystals do have somewhat dangerous elements, such as aluminum-bearing garnets, but they’re “locked” in the crystal structure in a way that prevents them from harming us unless the crystal is powdered or dissolved and inhaled/ingested. The occasional garnet or moonstone gem water won’t hurt you in the slightest.

Because there’s no way for this list to be ‘complete’ - I don’t know what unusual stones you might have - I advise you to never make gem waters with or otherwise ingest

  • powdery, very fine, or fibrous crystals;
  • crystals which you have not identified;
  • metal ores;
  • metals, with the exceptions of gold, platinum, tungsten, and titanium; and
  • stones composed of a variety of minerals.

Don’t use these crystals for gem water, elixir, massage oil, etc. Don’t put these crystals in your mouth or otherwise insert them into your body.

  • Adamite - contains arsenic
  • Amazonite - generally safe, but the color is usually caused by traces of lead; don’t use flaky or powdery specimens in gem waters
  • Atacamite - contains copper
  • Aurichalcite - contains copper and zinc
  • Azurite - contains copper
  • Boji stone - composition can vary, so some stones may have dangerous components
  • Brochantite - contains copper
  • Cerussite - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust
  • Chalcanthite - contains copper; wash hands after handling; do not rub eyes after handling; do not inhale; do not ingest
  • Chalcopyrite - ore of copper
  • Chrysocolla - contains copper
  • Cinnabar - ore of mercury; always wash hands after handling; do not inhale dust; never ingest in any form; do not heat; massive (aggregate) cinnabar can contain elemental mercury which is very easily absorbed by the body
  • Conichalcite - contains copper and arsenic
  • Cuprite - contains copper; do not ingest
  • Dioptase - delicate, may break or crumble into powder; contains copper
  • Eilat stone - contains copper
  • Galena - ore of lead; wash hands after handling; flaky/crumbly specimens are common, be careful not to inhale dust
  • Malachite - contains copper
  • Marcasite - decomposes to melanterite, which contains sulfuric acid; do not ingest; wash hands after handling; do not inhale
  • Mohawkite - contains copper and arsenic; may contain other toxins
  • Psilomelane - contains barium
  • Pyrite - broken-down pyrite can contain sulfuric acid; do not ingest; if pyrite appears blackish or crumbly, wash hands after handling
  • Realgar - contains arsenic; wash hands after handling; never ingest
  • Serpentine (sp. chrysotile) - safe unless fibrous; do not inhale; asbestos
  • Stibnite - very soft; contains antimony
  • Sulfur - can form sulfuric acid when in contact with moisture
  • Turquoise - usually safe unless powdery; contains copper
  • Vanadinite - contains lead; may have traces of arsenic
  • Wulfenite - ore of lead and molybdenum; do not ingest or inhale

A few final safety reminders

⚠️ Never swallow any crystals, because some otherwise safe crystals can interact with your stomach acids and produce dangerous chemicals.

⚠️ Never crush, powder, or dissolve crystals with the intention of inhaling or ingesting them - fine powders and solutions make elements more accessible to the body.

⚠️ Wash your crystals in water and gentle soap before making any gem waters, elixirs, etc. with them. Even if the crystal itself is safe, it may have been in contact with other dangerous crystals or chemicals.

⚠️ Never make gem water, elixirs, etc. with crystals that are on/in matrix (the base rock the crystals grew from). You don’t know what the matrix is composed of, and it may contain dangerous minerals or elements.

⚠️ Never burn, hold in a candle flame, or intentionally heat your crystals. Intentional heating should only be performed by a jewelry or gemstone professional in a controlled environment.
The sole exception to this is anhydrite without matrix, which may be carefully raised to 200°C (~400°F), dry heat, to dehydrate it and change any gypsum components back to anhydrite. Be aware that this process can occasionally result in fractures, breakage, or internal damage to the stone.

Keep yourself and your crystals safe, everyone! There’s no way for this list to be complete, because there are thousands of minerals out there, so please feel free to contact me if you have questions about any particular stones!

Skincare and Beauty Recommendations

For all you babes, I made a list of my must have stuff to look the best you can go scam an SD

 Body- Lush Ro Argan. This stuff is the bomb. It’s a body conditioner that smells like roses and honey. Smear that good stuff all over you and let it sit for five minutes. Wash it off and your body will be soft and smooth, no other products needed. I’ve used this stuff for five years and every person that gets a whiff of it compliments me. Guys go crazy for this scent, especially in the bed room downtown haha.JUST GET IT! You get a shower and body cream in one! 

Face Cream- Laneige Water Bank Cream. This shit makes my face look like it’s been kissed by an angel. So dewy and soft! I feel like I look much younger when I apply this because it hydrates so well. Perfect to use if you want something that traps the moisture in your face and is lightweight. I’ve noticed the dehydration wrinkles I had around my eyes and mouth have diminished. My makeup goes on like a dream after I apply this. 

 Face- Kojic acid soap. I use this soap for my uneven skin tone and acne spots. I barely wear foundation because it cleared up my clogged pores and hyperpigmenation. Dirt cheap off Amazon. Haven’t had a major breakout since I used this the past 3 years. 

 Perfume- Tom Ford private Collection comes in 12 scents. With mainstream brands, I feel like ALL WOMEN’s FRAGRANCES smell the same and give me a headache. Too sweet, floral, romantic, too much alcohol, etc.Now, this collection ain’t cheap, so, get a sample from your local department store. They give it to you in a cute vial and box and the sales associates are super knowledgeable about scents. THIS STUFF LASTS A LONG TIME! I wear the Tobacco Vanille all year round. Literally, this scent is my confident booster, I smell unique and luxurious! And the scent projects like a beast, so a 4 ML sample will last you cause all thats needed is a small dab for the day!  I used to buy decants off eBay to save £££ until I got me a SD to buy me the 100 ML hehe.

 Sunscreen- Elta SPF 40. This stuff is the best sunscreen on the market and all the dermatologists I’ve seen recommended it. No white cast and absorbs into skin fast, it’s also super moisturizing! 

 Hair- Bumble Bee Invisible Oil. If you have frizzy, dry, damaged, natural, thick hair, this SHIT IS THE BOMB. This is the only product that works on my hair when I wear it curly and straighten it. It does the job, smells great, and my hair looks so glossy and healthy….best of all it doesn’t weight my hair down or feel greasy. 

 Mascara- Lacome Hypnose is the only thing I use on my lashes in the past six years. I will NEVER STRAY from Lacome’s mascara products. It makes my eyes look amazing and it’s easy to take off at night. Don’t like the other brands like Benefit or Too Faced which are hard to remove at night.

 Makeup Remover- Clinique Take Off the Day Balm. Your makeup literally will melt off when you wash your face with this! I used so many different brands from wipes to oil to alcohol and none of them worked as well as this. 

 Lipstick- Nars Velvet Lip Pencil in Bahama is the best nude/rosy color out there for all girls IMO. I use the Train Bleu colour (quite vampy) when going out at night and always got compliments! Because it’s a jumbo pencil lippy, you can line your lips easily and fill it in! Lasts all night! Taylor Swift uses their Dragon Girl  shade as her signature red colour according to the makeup artist that showed me.! Best secret lippies around!

 Foundation- Giorgio Armani Luminous Silk is a game changer. My skin looks radiant, dewy, and natural which no other foundation has given me. Everyone raves about it and I wish I listened earlier and quit wasting my money at MAC and Estee Lauder.

Concealer- Nars Creamy Radiant Concealer- If you don’t like wearing foundation, this concealer is all you need then. It hides my dark eye circles and any redness on my face like a PRO. Comes with a wand so you don’t need to use anything else when applying it!

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[ revision log printable + google sheets ] — reviewing course material is an excellent way to retain information over the long term! to use for my exams, i made a little revision google sheet and a matching printable, which i’ve decided to share with the community (●っゝω・)っ~☆

✨ — at the time i didn’t realize it, but this is inspired by @s0manythings​‘ beautiful grade tracker printable + sheet set! go have a look!

✅ ——

  1. feel free to tag with #studykyt if you use.
  2. credit if necessary and don’t claim as your own!
  3. modifications are ok for personal use!
  4. i worked really hard on this, so likes + reblogs are much appreciated ♡ 

•  printable pdfs, available in 5 colors ( bubblegum, lavender moon, seafoam, silver & gold, studykyt colors ) + b&w version ( skyscraper ) + bonus color ( field berries ).

•  google sheets, available in 5 colors + bonus sheet ( field berries ). to use file in your drive, file ↬  make a copy. no drive? file ↬ download as ↬ microsoft excel.

• instructions manual on how to use the google sheet.

🔗 — printables  google sheet • manual

☆ — originals  more printables

—— happy studying! :: kyt / studykyt

has anybody thought of this yet??
  • Lance to Shiro: - and then he tried to walk away and i grabbed his glove -
  • Shiro: hang on
  • Shiro: you mean to tell me you tried to kiss keith?
  • Lance: yes, pay attention
  • Lance: but the thing is, he wore the gloves all the time
  • Lance: so i just thought
  • Lance: maybe he has a thing about dirt!
Beating Brush Lag in Manga Studio

Booooooooo… what is this, Photoshop?!

Lagging brushes are an occasional problem in any illustration software. Here’s a troubleshooting guide for Manga Studio if your tools are acting like molasses. (Some settings may be different on Windows or if you’re running the Clip Studio Paint branding of the software. For what it’s worth, I’m running Manga Studio 5.0.3 on Mac OS 10.7.5. Yup, I’m behind the times.) 


There are a few options to beat the lag: 

1. Quit Stuff
Bye bye, YouTube. See ya, Skype. Later, Tumblr.

Save your computer’s processor by quitting RAM-hogging apps and tasks while painting. Streaming audio/video will drastically reduce performance, but even leaving browsers open can slow things down, so best to just close it up. Guess that rules out Spotify, but then there’s always ye olde Zune. Gotta love cringing through those high school playlists while working.


2. Change Preferences
Easier than changing your mind, and quicker too.

Check under the hood of Manga Studio’s Preferences for a few speed boosts. Do the following in these sub menus:

Preferences/Tablet/Tablet Settings: Change from 1 to 6 (I believe this option is Mac only).

Preferences/Performance/Undo: Lower the Undo count. Try taking it down 10-15 notches from default. You could also turn up that long-titled setting (“Delay before recognizing new object…”) by 100 ms, but I haven’t figured out what that does exactly…

Preferences/Cursor/Display Position of Reversed Cursor: Make sure to check “No Delay”.

After changing preferences, it’s a good idea to close and reopen Manga Studio.


3. Modify Brush Tool Settings
Your brushes may take it personally, but remember you’re in charge here.

The Tool Settings window is a wealth of options for customizing brushes. Some are more processor-intensive than others. Here are a few of the best ones to modify: (Note: the look and behavior of brushes may be affected. You may want to duplicate and/or export a brush before changing its settings.)

Tool Settings/Anti-Aliasing: Turn down to “Little” or “None”

Tool Settings/Brush Tip: Reduce the number of materials on your brush.

Tool Settings/Stroke/Space: Increase spacing, but not too much. Brushes are essentially a string of material stamps. A low space setting means a smoother brush, but more work for your computer. Picture it frantically scrubbing a rubber stamp across your canvas. On that note, also make sure Continuous Spraying is not on.

Tool Settings/Watercolor Border: If your brush uses this setting, turn on the “Process After Drag” option. This renders the effect after each brush stroke and saves computing power.

Tool Settings/Correction: Turn off (or decrease) Stabilization, Post Correction, and Brush Stroke.

Tool Settings/Starting and Ending: Turn off all this stuff. Pfffft, who needs it, right?

Here’s a speed test after fiddling with some settings:

 Woooooooo! We’re getting faster! Still a bit laggy, which leads to one last tip:


4. Rework The Canvas
Might as well rework my life goals too.

Okay, disclosure: The two gifs in this post were recorded on a 4500x3000 canvas at 300dpi with a size 500 brush to emphasize lag. This third one is recorded on a 1080x720 canvas at 72dpi with a size 100 brush:

Yes! We’re cruising now! 

Canvas sizing and resolution has a big affect on brush performance. It’s a bit of a conundrum. Getting the best image quality means working at a minimum resolution of 300dpi, which can be taxing for brushes on large canvases. So what to do? Just like traditional paintings start with thumbnail sketches, digital work can start on a low-resolution canvas. Here’s the method:

Set up your canvas normally at the full target resolution. But before drawing anything on the canvas, use the handy tool under Edit/Change Image Resolution. Reduce Resolution to 72dpi. Use this smaller canvas for rough sketching, background filling, blocking in large areas of color, etc. Then increase resolution to 144dpi for building up the body of the painting, still keeping it loose. (I’d recommend switching Interpolate to Hard Outline when increasing resolution.) Finally, blow it up to full resolution and get into the nitty gritty of rendering. This is where you’ll do the crisp line work, highlights, details, etc.

The idea here is to work big to small. This will keep away brush lag by using large brushes on small canvases. As the canvas resolution increases, decrease brush size and work smaller, tightening things up in the process. NOTE: Increasing canvas resolution causes pixilation. Don’t worry about it. This can be cleaned up in the final stages of painting.


Hope this guide is helpful! If lagging persists, remember to check drivers and tablet settings as well. If all else fails, Google’s a good friend ;)

-Armin

reverie-addict  asked:

Hi, Vetyr! You mentioned that you work on 4000 x 4000 canvas. I wonder how long does it take you to finish a painting on average. Do you actually spend lots of time polishing the soft/hard edges? They seem to be so effortless. ;_; another question is how do you achieve such smooth transition? Does it have anything to do with pressure or flow setting of the brush?

It usually takes about 2.5-4 hours, and yeah I definitely spend a lot of time getting the edges just the way I want them.  Every so often, I’ll touch up areas with a soft brush, but much of the time I can get a pretty smooth transition between values/colors with a hard round brush w/ transfer enabled and set to ‘pen pressure’ (I don’t use flow), and excessive use of the eyedropper tool.  Also, a note for the gif below (which is running at 3x speed): when I’m blending colors and I don’t want the gradient to be muddy, I add a saturated color- in this case, pink- to the mix to keep it vibrant.

obligatory extra pic:

2

even the air is different today

[ exo : lotto : 2016 ]

GREY AREA. (M) | 01

And just like that, your fate was sealed - because Min Yoongi was absolutely going to destroy you. But hell if you weren’t going to let him, or bask happily in the flames as he did so.

And sadly, at the time, you didn’t think that your thoughts would become so literal.

“and maybe sometimes we shout the things we never want to say, and whisper to ourselves all the things which our hearts want to hear.” - ma.c.a

pairing: min yoongi x reader 
warnings: mature, heavy angst
genre: soulmate!au, slowburn
words: 4,444
chapter index



And it starts like this:


You’re standing in a party that one of the college fraternities is throwing, music blaring through a pair of speakers so loudly, that the voice of the singer comes out in a buzz. You feel your heart jump with the rhythm leaking into the room. You’re standing in the foyer of the large house, the room filled with too many people to be considered comfortable, bodies bump into you every few seconds, but you can’t find it within you to care.


You watch and laugh as Hoseok, one of your friend’s, does a keg stand. Two boys you don’t recognize, and you’re sure neither Hoseok or Taehyung do either, holding each one of his legs upwards. A number of people have huddled around to cheer him on, screaming out a chorus of, “Chug! Chug! Chug! Chug!”


Keep reading

Alex Kingston, portrait by Jason Marck

On a fairly regular basis, well-known actors come to the station for an interview. Because it’s radio, they’re often dressed down-they’re expecting an audio treatment, not photos (except maybe some fan selfies with my colleagues). Sometimes they politely decline when I ask if I can make a portrait of them. I understand because they’re so dependent on their face and their image for their livelihood. When they have studio shots done, there’s a whole team for makeup and hair, plus an army of people assisting the photog, all trying to make this person look their best. But once in a while, you get someone so unpretentious, they just go for it and trust you. Exhibit A: Alex Kingston. In a t-shirt, no makeup, and her trademark mane of red curls piled on top of her head, she kindly gave me this photo, which shows off her incredible multi-colored eyes framed by those aforementioned locks. Trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, she’s a versatile and hard-working actor active on stage, screen, and television since the early 1980’s, but in Britain and the U.S. She’s most famous for her title roll in The Fortune and Misfortunes of Moll Flanders, as River Song in Dr. Who, and as Elizabeth Corday for 12 seasons of E.R.